hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 30 results in 6 document sections:

y have it, if some unforeseen event does not transpire. If such a thing as a battle takes place, it will be one of extermination on either side. For it will be the great battle for supremacy in the Kanawha Valley. The strength of the Southern forces is variously estimated at from seven to eight thousand, not including cavalry and artillery. Our forces must be at least thirteen thousand. The Southern forces are commanded by Generals Floyd and Henningsen, and are now situated between Cotton Mountain and Fayetteville. General Benham's brigade, some three thousand five hundred strong, are at this point, Gen. Schenck's is at Camp Ewing, near Mountain Cave; Col. McCook's brigade a few miles from them; Gen. Cox is at Gauley, and Gen. Rosecrans at Tompkins' farm. The men are all in good spirits, and anxiously awaiting the coming contest. The truth of the matter is, they are willing to meet double their number, so as to get out of Western Virginia; and if they are foiled in this atte
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
of Charleston July 25. Advance to Gauley July 26-August 1. Moved to Camp Piatt, arriving August 25. Gauley Bridge August 28. Boone Court House September 1. Peytonia September 12. Moved to Raleigh September 20-27. Chapmansville September 25. Return to Gauley, arriving there October 10. Cotton Hill October 13. Operations in Kanawha Valley October 19-November 16. Gauley Bridge October 23. Attack on Gauley by Floyd's Batteries November 1-9. Movement on Cotton Mountain and pursuit of Floyd November 1-18. Duty at Gauley Bridge till April, 1862. Advance on Princeton April 22-May 4. At Flat Top Mountain till August. Wolf Creek May 15. Moved to Washington, D. C., August 14-23. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Frederick, Md., September 12. Battles of South Mountain September 14, and Antietam September 16-17. Moved to Clarksburg, Suttonville, Summerville, Gauley Bridge and Kanawha Falls, W. Va., October 8-November 14, and duty th
ns in the Kanawha Valley and New River Region October 19-November 16. Gauley Bridge November 10. Blake's Farm, Cotton Mountain, November 10-11. Moved to Point Pleasant December 11, and duty there till April 16, 1862. Operations in the Kal Mountain September 24. Sewell Mountain September 25. At Hawk's Nest October 10 to November 1. Movement on Cotton Mountain and pursuit of Floyd November 1-18. Laurel Creek November 12 (Co. H ). Duty at Charleston till April, 1862. 15. Retreat to New River October. Operations in Kanawha Valley and New River Region October 19-November 16. Cotton Mountain November 11-12. At Fayette Court House till April, 1862. Occupation of Raleigh Court House December 28, 1861, ill September. Campaign in the Kanawha Valley September 6-16. Loring's attack on Fayetteville September 10. Cotton Mountain September 11. Charleston September 12-13. At Point Pleasant till October 15. At Fayetteville till May, 1863
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ly eluded him on the previous night. In a day or two after this occurrence General Floyd's command was ordered to Cotton Mountain, probably a hundred miles distant. Floyd's command was now reinforced, and consisted of the following troops: Twentyartillery company, and Captains Jackson's and Adams's batteries, and a few cavalry companies. From Little Sewell to Cotton Mountain we had to march through a very rugged section of country, and were compelled to take a very circuitous route in orded condition, we had to hitch twelve to one piece of cannon and put our shoulders to the wheels. However, we reached Cotton Mountain after no little trouble, and went into camp near its southern base. A few days after remaining here it was report no damage. In a day or two General Floyd ordered a piece of cannon from my battery to be placed upon the summit of Cotton Mountain and to shell the enemy on the opposite side of the river, as he could be seen distinctly in the vicinity of Colonel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
ly eluded him on the previous night. In a day or two after this occurrence General Floyd's command was ordered to Cotton Mountain, probably a hundred miles distant. Floyd's command was now reinforced, and consisted of the following troops: Twentyartillery company, and Captains Jackson's and Adams's batteries, and a few cavalry companies. From Little Sewell to Cotton Mountain we had to march through a very rugged section of country, and were compelled to take a very circuitous route in orded condition, we had to hitch twelve to one piece of cannon and put our shoulders to the wheels. However, we reached Cotton Mountain after no little trouble, and went into camp near its southern base. A few days after remaining here it was report no damage. In a day or two General Floyd ordered a piece of cannon from my battery to be placed upon the summit of Cotton Mountain and to shell the enemy on the opposite side of the river, as he could be seen distinctly in the vicinity of Colonel
Kanawha volunteers. Editors Dispatch: I wish to draw public attention to the situation of the Twenty-Second (late Tompkins's) Regiment Virginia Volunteers. This force is composed of the troops that were raised in the Kanawha Valley at the commencement of hostilities, who have been in active service ever since, and now, after a campaign of unsurpassed hardship, suffering, and gallantry, were recently stationed with the command of Gen. Floyd on Cotton Mountain. From that bleak summit they looked down on the encampment of the invaders who have seized on their country, and still hold the fairest region of the Confederation in bondage. Let us remember that the men of this regiment are Virginians, who have gained victories, endured privations, and braved the worst difficulties of a soldier's life for the common cause; and yet are as much strangers now on the soil of the State as the poor exiles of Maryland and Alexandria. It is generally known that the Valley of the Kanawh