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ll's Point, and the Dacotah fired a shot towards Craney Island, which fell short. A second shot from the Dacotnitor are moving up abreast, and are approaching Craney Island and Sewell's Point. The Dacotah stops and firesy few minutes, alternately at Sewell's Point and Craney Island, the enemy making no reply, although the balls a, and the shells are falling briskly around her. Craney Island is also joining in the fight, and has just thrown moving slowly along the shore, in front of the Craney Island batteries. Simultaneously with the appearance olying stationary, about a mile in advance of the Craney Island battery. The Vanderbilt and the Arago have aled. The Merrimac has run back under the guns of Craney Island, and the Monitor is steaming off towards her at d, but the Merrimac still lies under the guns of Craney Island. The Monitor is lying about a mile and a half f Of the many shots fired from Sewell's Point and Craney Island, not one struck any of the vessels. One or two
ch for the Merrimac. The former has two guns, the latter eight. The Monitor is our chief dependence. If any accident should befall her Newport News would be taken, probably depending on the land force. It is said Magruder has from 15,000 to 18,000 men extending from James river to Yorktown. I have almost 12,500 effective troops, including the garrison of Fortress Monroe, and only about 110 regulars artillery. I do not believe the channel could be blocked between Sewell's Point and Craney island without first taking Sewell's battery, consisting of from 25 to 30 guns, several of which are 10-inch. John E. Wool, Maj.-Gen. Heintzelman to McClellan.Fort Lyon, March 13. Gen. McClellan: Allow me to recommend to you to have a complete survey made, by the engineers, of the enemy's works at Centreville and Manassas, with a memoir to meet the false statements that will be made to your prejudice. S. P. Heintzelman, Brig.-Gen. Dennison to McClellan.Washington, March 14
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
after this the rebels concentrated their whole battery upon the tower and pilot-house of the Monitor, and soon after the latter stood down for Fortress Monroe, and we thought it probable she had exhausted her supply of ammunition or sustained some injury. Soon after, the Merrimac and two other steamers headed for my ship, and I then felt to the fullest extent my condition. . . . On ascending the poop-deck, I observed that the enemy's vessels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. Captain Parker's candid and unprejudiced review of this action states: Why the Merrimac did not persist in destroying the Minnesota, I never exactly understood. . .. Whatever the cause, candor compels me to say that the Merrimac failed to reap the fruits of her victory. She went out to destroy the Minnesota, and do what further damage to the enemy she could. The Monitor was there to save the Minnesota. The Merrimac did not accomplish her purpose. The Monitor did. She did it
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
, navyyard, barracks, and marine hospital. May 10, 1862. Federal gunboats in the Mississippi, under the command of Acting Flag-Officer Davis, were attacked above Fort Pillow by the Confed. River Defense fleet, which after a half-hour's contest, was forced to retire. The Federal gunboats Cincinnati and Mound City were badly injured, and the Confed. vessels also were considerably cut up. May 11, 1862. Confed. ironclad Merrimac was abandoned by her crew and blown up off Craney Island, Va. May 13, 1862. Confed. armed steamer Planter run out of Charleston, S. C., by a negro crew, and surrendered to Comdr. Parrott, of the U. S. S. Augusta. Natchez, Miss., surrendered to Iroquois, Comdr. J. S. Palmer. May 15, 1862. Federal ironclad Monitor, together with the Port Royal, Aroostook, and the mailed gunboats Galena and E. A. Stevens, attacked Fort Darling, on Drewry's Bluff, 6 miles below Richmond, on the James River. The Galena was badly damaged, and lost
l to present a serious obstacle to the passage of troops, redoubts were constructed, with curtains connecting them. Between Yorktown and Gloucester Point, on the opposite shore, the York River is contracted to less than a mile in width, and General Magruder had constructed batteries at both places which, by their crossfire, presented a formidable obstacle to the ascent of ordinary vessels. The fortifications at Norfolk and the navy-yard, together with batteries at Sewell's Point and Craney Island, in conjunction with the navy, offered means of defense against any attempt to land troops on the south side of James River. After the first trial of strength with our Virginia, there had been an evident disinclination on the part of the enemy's vessels to encounter her, so that, as long as she floated, the deep water of the roads and mouth of James River was not likely to be invaded by ships of war. As a second line of defense, a system of detached works had been constructed by Gene
een taken seaward, and that such was the opinion of her first commander. He said: I consulted Commodore Buchanan on the character and power of the ship. He expressed the distinct opinion that she was unseaworthy, that she was not sufficiently buoyant, and that in a common sea she would founder. She could not, it therefore appears, ascend the river, was unseaworthy, and was uncovered by the retreat of the troops with whom she had cooperated. So, on May 10th, the Virginia was taken to Craney Island, one mile above, and there her crew were landed; they fell in and formed on the beach, and, in the language of the eye-witness heretofore quoted, then and there, on the very field of her fame, within sight of the Cumberland's top-gallant-masts, all awash, within sight of that magnificent fleet still cowering on the shoal, with her laurels all fresh and green, we hauled down her drooping colors, and, with mingled pride and grief, we gave her to the flames. The Story of the Confederate Sh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
18-22, 1813 Elizabethtown (Canada)Feb. 7, 1813 OgdensburgFeb. 22, 1813 York (Toronto)April 27, 1813 Fort MeigsMay 5, 1813 Fort GeorgeMay 27, 1813 Sackett's HarborMay 29, 1813 Stony CreekJune 6, 1813 Hampton (Defence of)June 13, 1813 Craney IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort StephensonAug. 2, 1813 Stonington (Bombardment of)Aug. 9-11, 1813 Fort MimsAug. 30, 1813 Th 18-22, 1813 Elizabethtown (Canada)Feb. 7, 1813 OgdensburgFeb. 22, 1813 York (Toronto)April 27, 1813 Fort MeigsMay 5, 1813 Fort GeorgeMay 27, 1813 Sackett's HarborMay 29, 1813 Stony CreekJune 6, 1813 Hampton (Defence of)June 13, 1813 Craney IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort StephensonAug. 2, 1813 Stonington (Bombardment of)Aug. 9-11, 1813 Fort MimsAug. 30, 1813 T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
—4. British steamer Circassian captured near Havana, Cuba. Skirmish at Lebanon, Tenn.; the Confederates defeated, with the loss of 105 men, their guns, and horses. The Confederates burn their gunboats on the York River. Battle of West Point, Va., and Union victory.—8. Union cavalry surprised and captured near Corinth, Miss. —9. Attack on Sewell's Point by the Monitor. Confederates evacuate Pensacola. Skirmish at Slater's Mills, Va. Bombardment of Fort Darling, on James River.— 10. Craney Island abandoned by the Confederates. General Butler seized $800,000 in gold in the office of the Netherlands Consulate, New Orleans, when all the foreign consuls uttered a protest.—11. Pensacola occupied by Union troops; the navyyard and public buildings, excepting the custom-house, had been burned by the Confederates.—12. President Lincoln proclaimed that the ports of Beaufort, N. C., Port Royal, S. C., and New Orleans should be open to commerce after June 1.—13. Natchez, Miss., surr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craney Island, operations at (search)
Craney Island, operations at On June 1, 1813, Admiral Sir J. Borlase Warren entered the Chesapeake with a considerable reinforcement for Nelson (one on each side of the Elizabeth The Block-House on Craney Island, 1813. River), and Forts Tar and Barbour, and the fortifications on Craney Island, 5 miles below the city. Towards midnight of June 19 Captain Tarbell, by order of Commodore Cassin, commanding the statiofrom the rest of the British fleet. Fifteen sharp-shooters from Craney Island were added to the crews of the boats. At half-past 3 in the mosembled several thousand militia, in anticipation of invasion. Craney Island, then in shape like a painter's palette, was separated from theifty marines under Lieutenant Breckinridge. The whole force on Craney Island on June 2 numbered 737 men. At midnight the camp was alarmede of her numerous oars), and made for the narrow strait between Craney Island and the main. Faulkner had his artillery in position, and when
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hampton, (search)
the The burning of Hampton. first gun fired at the British in Virginia. It was followed by a volley. Boats sunk in the channel retarded the British ships, and, after a sharp skirmish the next day, Oct. 27, the blockaders were driven away. One of the tenders was taken, with its armament and seamen, and several of the British were slain. The Virginians did not lose a man. This was the first battle of the Revolution in Virginia. In 1813 the British, exasperated by their repulse at Craney Island, proceeded to attack the village of Hampton. It was defended at the time by about 450 Virginia soldiers, commanded by Maj. Stapleton Crutchfield. They were chiefly militia infantry, with a few artillerymen and cavalry. They had a heavy battery to defend the water-front of the camp and village, composed of four 6, two 12, and one 18 pounder cannon, in charge of Sergt. William Burke. Early on the morning of June 25, about 2,500 British land-troops, under Gen. Sir Sidney Beckwith (inclu
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