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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ons were put in position on the subsequent night. McCauley sent a message to the Commanding General, Taliaferro, to the effect that if he continued to throw up works in a threatening position, the Commodore would regard it as an act of war, and fire upon them. In reply, General Taliaferro disclaimed any knowledge of the existence of the batteries; and McCauley was obliged to rest satisfied with this answer. Lieutenant Selfridge of the Cumberland volunteered to take the Dolphin down to Craney Island, and prevent any further obstructing of the river; but the Commodore, though at first consenting, finally refused to give him permission. On Friday, the 19th, Commodore McCauley resolved to destroy the principal vessels. It is hard to say why he arrived at this conclusion, the Merrimac's engine having been reported ready and her fires lighted the day before. The time for heeding the sensitiveness of the population was now past; and, in this respect, it made little difference whether
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ll under the fire of the latter port, when she retired to her moorings at the mouth of the river. After the evacuation of Norfolk the Merrimac was taken above Craney Island and blown up on the 11th of May. The Monitor was then up James river, having gone up the day before, and was probably more than fifty miles away. She had refhe ship after all hope was gone of saving her. On ascending the poop-deck, I observed that the enemy's vessels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. I have the honor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editorthe pilots saying they could not take her up. Her shield was then out of water; we were not in fighting condition. We therefore ran her ashore in the bight of Craney Island, landed the crew, and set the vessel on fire. The magazine exploded about half-past 4 on the morning of the 11th of May, 1862. The crew arrived at Drewry's B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
ress Monroe and the Rip-Raps. The Merrimac pursued at full speed until she came well under the fire of the latter port, when she retired to her moorings at the mouth of the river. After the evacuation of Norfolk the Merrimac was taken above Craney Island and blown up on the 11th of May. The Monitor was then up James river, having gone up the day before, and was probably more than fifty miles away. She had refused the gage of battle offered her by the Merrimac daily since the 11th of April. ter consulting with my officers I ordered every preparation to be made to destroy the ship after all hope was gone of saving her. On ascending the poop-deck, I observed that the enemy's vessels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. I have the honor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editor, the account of Captain Van Brunt to be correct, how does the claim that the Monit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
ced until projectiles from the Rip Raps fell more than half a mile beyond us. Our object, however, was accomplished; we had put an end to the bombardment, and we returned to our buoy. Norfolk was evacuated on the 10th of May. In order that the ship might be carried up the James river, we commenced to lighten her, but ceased on the pilots saying they could not take her up. Her shield was then out of water; we were not in fighting condition. We therefore ran her ashore in the bight of Craney Island, landed the crew, and set the vessel on fire. The magazine exploded about half-past 4 on the morning of the 11th of May, 1862. The crew arrived at Drewry's Bluff the next day, and assisted in defeating the Monitor, Galena, and other vessels on the 15th of May. Commodore Tatnall was tried by court-marshal for destroying the Virginia, and was honorably acquitted of all the charges. The court stated the facts, and their motives for acquitting him. Some of them are as follows: That aft
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and the Monitor—Report of the Committee on Naval Affairs. (search)
k and ordered me to get under way and run out to see the Merrimac finish up. We ran down off Craney Island and from our deck saw the fight between the Monitor and Merrimac. The Confederates were allresult, and that she would go where she wished, with impunity to herself. We had been off Craney Island about half an hour, in plain sight of Hampton Roads, and the different craft there. We saw preparations made by the rebels to evacuate it. Admiral Tatnall blew up the Merrimac off Craney Island shortly afterwards—a fitting end to a gallant but unfortunate ship in the service she was laop deck I discovered that the enemy's vessels had changed their course, and were heading for Craney Island. We also give extract from a telegraphic dispatch sent by G. V. Fox to Hon. Gideon Wellengs at the mouth of the river. After the evacuation of Norfolk the Merrimac was taken above Craney Island and blown up, on the 11th of May. * * * She (the Monitor) had refused the gage of battle off
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate steamship Patrick Henry. (search)
t Newport News, and the Patrick Henry was ordered to participate in the battle. The day before the attack was to be made, the Patrick Henry was moved down to Day's Neck, and an anchorage taken, from which any vessel coming out from Norfolk could be seen. The 8th of March, 1862, was a bright, placid, beautiful day, more like a May than a March day. All eyes on board the Patrick Henry were watching for the Virginia. About one o'clock in the afternoon she came steaming out from behind Craney Island, attended by her satellites—the gunboats Beaufort and Raleigh. Grand, and strong, and confident, a Hercules of the waters, she moved straight upon the enemy. It was not necessary to call all hands up anchor on board the Patrick Henry, the anchor was raised with a run, and under a full head of steam the vessel sped on her way to aid her powerful friend. The Confederate vessels in James river formed in line ahead as they approached the batteries at Newport News. The Patrick Henry,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
duty. No official records ever bore the names of those gallant partisans, whose daring deeds are known only to the Omniscient. There were no horn-blowers and quill-drivers among them. If we come to the war of 1812, all will concede that Jackson, of North Carolina, and Harrison, of Virginia, gained the most laurels, as shown by the elevation of both of them to the presidency. All, too, readily concede that the brilliant land-fights of that war were in defence of New Orleans, Mobile, Craney Island and Baltimore, all fought by Southern troops on Southern soil. Although that war was waged in the interests of the maritime rights of the North, it soon became unpopular in New England, because it seriously damaged trade and commerce. The Hartford Convention shows how deep was the defection in that region. The doctrine of secession was taught there half a century before the South took it up. In Barnes' History of the United States, the author tells us (page 167) of the ravaging o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
rly half speed. All went well until we were abreast of Craney Island (five miles from Norfolk), when the Merrimac was so near assistance, took a hawser from her and towed her past Craney-Island light, where, the water getting deeper, we let her go. feet of water and were able to cut across the flats of Craney Island, whilst the Merrimac had to keep the channel until abreot under way late in the evening and anchored inside of Craney Island for the night, to make an early start the next morning.strong Federal force on the bay shore, and also west of Craney Island, and making a combined attack from the east and west. ag-Lieutenant J. Pembroke Jones was immediately sent to Craney Island, and there learned for the first time that a large forcrt, and at this hour all the batteries on the river and Craney Island had been abandoned by our troops. The night was fast a in Richmond. She was, therefore, put on shore as near Craney Island as possible, and having but two boats it took three hou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
on a dark, rainy night. Such getting out and excitement we had never seen, or heard of What's the matter? was being asked by everyone, officer and private. No one seemed to know. It was whispered down the line that the Pawnee had run pass Craney Island, and was coming up to Norfolk. One man said it was the artillery's business to attend to the Pawnee and not the infantry's. We were soon formed in line, and on our way to Norfolk, passed on through and soon got into a country road, passed CrCraney Island without seeing the Pawnee. Next rumor was that the enemy had landed at Sewell's Point in large forces, and were coming up the same road we were on. We were told to keep quiet, and march in close order. My chum said he was under the impression that if we were farther apart when the enemy fired into us, they would not kill so many. I thought the same. When we reached Sewell's Point we found everything serenely quiet and happy, to the disgust of the boys who wanted to fight. We we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The ironclad ram Virginia-Confederate States Navy, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, April 1, 1904.] (search)
in no condition to fight. Before this, however, all hands were called to quarters and Commodore Tatnall, stating the condition of affairs, said all hands must work with a will to lighten the ship. Everyone worked with a will, but, as everyone believed afterwards, the pilots had turned traitors to the good old fighter and to the Confederacy. The Virginia could not get over the bar in her path even when she did not draw but eighteen feet. The commander then ran the vessel ashore off Craney Island, landed the crew and set fire to the ship. The magazine exploded about 5 o'clock on the morning of May 11, 1862. We arrived at Drewry's Bluff the next day. The batteries there repulsed the Monitor, Galena and other vessels on May 15, and Drewry's Bluff was thereafter called the Marine or Iron battery. During the 8th and 9th of March, 1862, the Confederate fleet successfully encountered and defied a force equal to 2,896 men and 230 guns, as follows: Men.Guns. Congress (burned),48
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