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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
rates and occupied by the Union forces. Destruction of Cypress Creek and Tuscumbia Bridges. Capture of Booneville, Miss. 3 where the enemy had prematurely burned the bridge over Cypress Creek, thereby preventing the escape of 7 locomotives and traack and of the telegraph wire, throwing the latter into Cypress Creek. Having accomplished this daring feat, he turned his s, destroying the Mobile and Ohio Railroad bridge across Cypress Creek near Jones' Mill, and about 5 miles south of Bethel. Our cavalry then advanced to the railroad bridge over Cypress Creek, as before stated, and after executing their orders reteport as to the burning of the railroad bridge over Cypress Creek, Tenn.: On the night of May 29 Capt. Jeff. Falkner, congine, had, previous to my arrival, gone forward across Cypress Creek to Tuscumbia Creek, to give notice of the fact that therains were again set in motion, and proceeded as far as Cypress Creek, where we found that the bridge had been fired immediat
with the misfortune of having one of his legs broken. Pressing on, however, he delivered the order. Lieut.-Col. William McCollough, with the small available force at hand, consisting of only two hundred and fifty Illinois mounted men, started after nightfall, and marching through rain and mire all night, seventeen miles, came to the road, and dismounting his men under the enemy's fire, destroyed three bridges, a portion of the road-track and telegraph-wire — throwing the latter into Cypress Creek. Having accomplished this daring feat, he turned his small force against the enemy's cavalry and, boldly attacking them, drove them back in confusion upon and through Purdy, killing a number of them and losing one man and several horses. This achievement prevented the enemy from turning our flank at Pea Ridge, and while advancing upon Corinth. All credit is due to the officers and men accomplishing it. Encamping the Third division at Mickey's White House, and the First division sou
ersa. Rumors that the attack was to take the direction of Jackson or Bolivar, via Bethel, were so rife, and the fortifications of Corinth were so well known to the rebels, that I had hopes they would undertake to mask me, and, passing north, give me an opportunity to beat the masking force, and cut off their retreat. This hope gained some strength from the supposed difficulties of the country lying in the triangle formed by the Memphis and Charleston, the Mobile and Ohio railroads and Cypress Creek. To be prepared for eventualities, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions were placed just beyond Bridge Creek, the infantry outposts were called in from Iuka, Burnsville, Rienzi and Danville, and the outpost at Chewalla retired to New-Alexander, and strengthened by another regiment and a battery, early on the morning of the second. During that day evidences increased showing the practicability of the country north-west of us, and disclosed the facts, not before known, that there were
ersa. Rumors that the attack was to take the direction of Jackson or Bolivar, via Bethel, were so rife, and the fortifications of Corinth were so well known to the rebels, that I had hopes they would undertake to mask me, and, passing north, give me an opportunity to beat the masking force, and cut off their retreat. This hope gained some strength from the supposed difficulties of the country lying in the triangle formed by the Memphis and Charleston, the Mobile and Ohio railroads and Cypress Creek. To be prepared for eventualities, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions were placed just beyond Bridge Creek, the infantry outposts were called in from Iuka, Burnsville, Rienzi and Danville, and the outpost at Chewalla retired to New-Alexander, and strengthened by another regiment and a battery, early on the morning of the second. During that day evidences increased showing the practicability of the country north-west of us, and disclosed the facts, not before known, that there were
12, 1862. To Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Ivey, Assistant Adjutant General: Sir: I have the honor to forward herewith reports from my several commands in regard to the part taken by them in the actions of the third, fourth, and fifth instants, at and near Corinth. It will be seen that, passing over the deployments between Chewalla and the creek west of Corinth, where the enemy's outposts were driven in with little or no resistance, this brigade first formed line of battle to the east of Cypress Creek, with Rust's brigade on its right and Villepigue's on the left. A heavy line of skirmishers, composed of the First Missouri regiment and the Mississippi battalion of sharpshooters, proceeding in advance, supported by the Twenty-second and Fifteenth Mississippi regiment in line, and the Sixth Mississippi regiment (Colonel Lowry), and Watson battery (Captain Bursley) in reserve. The line advanced steadily, forcing back the enemy's sharpshooters into their intrenchments, and pushing on,
cavalry was picketing the south side of the Tennesse from Decatur to Tuscumbia, and Forrest, with the main cavalry force, was reported at Corinth, Mississippi, with outposts at Eastport and along the west bank of the Tennessee. On the twenty-ninth General Granger reported the enemy in his front to be withdrawing from Decatur toward Courtland. The same day General Croxton, commanding a brigade of cavalry picketing the north bank of the river, reported the enemy crossing at the mouth of Cypress creek, two miles below Florence, stating at the same time that he would move with all the force he could spare to drive the enemy back. Directions were sent to General Hatch, commanding a division of cavalry at Clifton, on the east bank of the Tennessee, to move to the support of Croxton at Florence, impressing upon both commanders the necessity of keeping the enemy from crossing to the north side of the river, until the Fourth corps, already on its way from General Sherman in Georgia, could
ain was across by nine A. M., footmen and stragglers by ten A. M., when we immediately commenced taking up the bridge, scuttling all the barges, wooden pontoons, also eighteen of the canvas pontoons, and destroying thirty wagons and harness, and mounting the pontoniers, that heretofore had been on foot, on the surplus mules. Left Selma at two o'clock P. M., tenth, and travelled all day and night, making only about ten miles, the roads being so intolerably bad. Eleventh. Travelled to Cypress creek, about twelve miles; found it deep, put in a bridge of four boats. Twelfth. Crossed, took up the bridge and travelled twenty miles. Roads some better. Thirteenth. Arrived at Montgomery and passed it seven and a half miles, making about twenty-eight miles. Fourteenth. Moved forward at three o'clock P. M., and travelled fifteen miles against one o'clock A. M. Fifteenth. It rained a shower and made the roads very muddy; made fourteen miles. Sixteenth. Made twenty-eight m
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
8, 1; 135-A; 150, E3; 171 Cumberland Valley Railroad 25, 6; 43, 7; 82, 3; 136, C6 Fort Cummings, N. Mex. 98, 1 Cummings Point, S. C. 4, 1; 23, 6; 26, 2; 131, 1 Views, Feb. And March, 1861 1, 3; 2, 1, 2, 3 Current River, Mo. 47, 1; 153, A5, 153, D7 Currituck Inlet, N. C. 138, B12; 171 Currituck Sound, N. C. 138, B12 Cushingville, Ga. 71, 7 Cynthiana, Ky. 118, 1; 135-A; 141, C2; 151, E13; 171 Cypress Creek, La. 158, B12 Cypress Creek, Tenn. 149, C1; 154, B13 Dabney's Mill, Va. 66, 9; 74, 1, 74, 2; 77, 2; 93, 1; 94, 8, 94, 9; 100, 1, 100, 2 Dakota Territory 163-171 Sioux Expedition, June 16-Sept. 13, 1863 33, 2, 33, 4, 33, 5 Dallas, Ga. 43, 5, 43, 6, 43, 9; 48, 3, 48, 4; 56, 5; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 2, 58, 4; 59, 3, 59, 5; 61, 13; 62, 1; 76, 1, 76, 2; 88, 2; 90, 6, 90, 7; 101, 13; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, G12 Dallas, La. 135-A; 155, C6 Dallas, Mo. 47, 1; 153, B9 Dallas Line, Ga.
sh by bravery and daring, and should incite them to like deeds of valor. By command of General Beauregard, general orders, No. 74. Capt. A. W. Bowie's company, Alabama cavalry: No. 75—(793) Mentioned near Rome, Ga., June 22, 1864, in letter from Maj. W. J. Walthall. No. 78—(686) Letter from Captain Bowie to Major Walthall, dated near Talladega, July 5th. Eighth Confederate cavalry, Col. W. B. Wade. Vol. X—(868, 869) Reports of Capt. J. Falkner and Lieut. J. S. Prather, burning of Cypress creek bridge, May 30, 1862. (880) Report of Colonel Claiborne, Sixth Confederate cavalry, May 9th. Vol. XVI, Part 1—(898, 899) General Wheeler mentions engagement on Perryville pike, October 1, 1862, in which regiment took part. Vol. XVI, Part 2—(790) Mentioned by Gen. Sam Jones, Chattanooga, August 31, 1862. (912) Colonel Wharton mentions in communication to General Polk, October 5th. Says will be at Lebanon next day. Vol. XVII, Part 1—(5-8) Reports of Col. J.
s filled with military stores and wounded, and a train was standing loaded with military stores. These he destroyed, after removing the wounded to a place of safety, and tore up the track, Col. P. H. Sheridan and Capt. R. A. Alger assisting in the work. A few hundred Confederate infantry were captured and paroled, and the cavalry fought the Federals during their operations and escaped without much loss. The greatest loss during the retreat occurred between Booneville and Corinth, at Cypress Creek, where Confederates themselves had burned the railroad bridge, cutting off the way for seven trains mostly loaded with supplies of all sorts. Charles S. Williams, assistant superintendent of the Memphis & Charleston railroad, himself ordered the destruction of the locomotives and sixty-two cars, and his orders were carried out. The truth about Beauregard's frantic retreat was that he made such a stand on the way to Tupelo that Pope dared not attack him, and though reinforced by Buell
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