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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
gade, Dept. of the Cumberland, to December, 1863. Post of Murfreesboro, District of Nashville, Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1865. Service. March from Covington to Georgetown, Lexington, Sandersville and Nicholasville October 7-November 13, 1862. Duty at Nichclasville till December 12. Moved to Danville, Ky., December 12 and duty. there till January 26, 1863. Moved to Louisville, Ky., thence to Nashville, Tenn., January 26-February 7, 1863, and to Brentwood Station February 21, thence to Franklin. Reconnoissance toward Thompson's Station, Spring Hill, March 3-5. Action at Thompson's Station March 4-5. (Nearly 200 of Regiment captured by Bragg's Cavalry forces under Van Dorn, nearly 18,000 strong.) Ordered to Brentwood Station March 8. Action at Little Harpeth, Brentwood, Marc
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
ek May 31. Buell's Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee June to August. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 22. Pursuit of Bragg to Loudon October 1-22. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. Danville October 11. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 22-November 9, and duty there till December 26. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31 and January 1-3, 1863. At Murfreesboro till June. Middle 31. Buell's Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee June to August. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg to Loudon, Ky., October 1-22. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. Danville October 11. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 22-November 9, and duty there till December 26. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Duty at Murfreesboro till Jun
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
ched to 1st Division, District of Kentucky, Dept. of Ohio, to February, 1865. Military District and Dept. of Kentucky to December, 1865, and Dept. of Arkansas to April, 1866. Service. Stoneman's Raid into Southwestern Virginia December 10-29, 1864. Capture and destruction of lead mines December 17. Near Marion December 17-18. Saltsville December 20-21. At Camp Nelson and Paducah, Ky., till March, 1865. At LaGrange, Tenn., till May. At Camp Nelson, Wild Cat, and Danville, Ky., till July. At New Haven and Catlettsburg, Ky., till October. At Covington, Ky., till December. At Louisville, Ky., and Helena, Ark., till January, 1866. At Duvall's Bluff, Ark., till April 15, 1866. Mustered out April 15, 1866. 1st United States Colored Regiment Heavy Artillery Organized at Knoxville, Tenn., February 20, 1864. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Corps, Dept. of Ohio, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennes
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 20: Appomattox and after (search)
Chapter 20: Appomattox and after Lee's surrender Sixth Corps sent South to Burkesville and Danville Receives recruits and officers mustered to full ranks Returns to Washington and 121st is mustered out at Halls Hill, Va The battle of Sailor's Creek to the 6th Corps was of special interest, for it settled by the capture of General Ewell and the remnants of his corps a long succession of bitter conflicts between them. They had met during the previous year, in the Wilderness, May 5th and 6th, again on May 10th in the charge led by General Upton that broke through their works. In the all day fight of the 12th of May they had again been antagonists. The campaign in the Valley of the Shenandoah had been waged against Early's division of Ewell's corps, and now at the very close of the war the final conflict between them had resulted in the destruction of the corps, so long led by the veteran general of Lee's 3d Army Corps. The result was disastrous also to the Army of
enton, Thomas Hart [1782-1858], upholds slavery in Texas, 1.153, denounces abolition pictures, 232; makes light of Cherokee outrage, 271; slow to discern A. S. agitation, 416; opposes Calhoun's bill for censorship of mails, 2.74; praises Northern doughfaces, 80; fears Southern ultraism, 81. Bethune, George Washington, Rev. [1805-1862], 1.447. Bexley, Lord [1766-1851], 1.367. Bible Society. See Am. Bible Society. Biblical Repertory (Princeton), 2.78. Birney, James Gillespie [b. Danville, Ky., Feb. 4, 1792; d. Eagleswood, N. J., Nov. 24, 1857], leaves Colonization Soc., 1.421, 422, 454; defended by G., 458; literary style, 461; Ky. A. S. Soc., 479; letter to Ala. Vigilance Com., 232; printing-office destroyed, 2.77, personal peril, 93; letter from Channing, 98, tribute to G., 122, 132, disclaims Channing's compliments, 132; censures G. for course towards Clerical Appeal, 166; visits J. Q. Adams, 196; opposed to A. S. party, 310; at quarterly meeting Mass. A. S. S., 287, 288;
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
thfully said that no braver officer or more gallant soldier served on the Confederate side during the war, and no man enjoyed a wider popularity in the communtiy in which he resided. He was born in Anderson county, S. C., October 30, 1837, being the son of Rev. David Humphreys, a Presbyterian clergyman, and Rebecca (Cunningham) Humphreys, both of whom were natives of South Carolina. Major Humphreys was reared in Anderson county and received his collegiate education at Centre college, of Danville, Ky., from which he graduated in 1857. He then pursued the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1860. He located in Anderson and had barely entered upon the practice of his profession when the war broke out. At the first call for troops he volunteered and helped to organize Company B, Fourth South Carolina regiment, of which he was elected first lieutenant. He served with it twelve months, three as first lieutenant and nine as captain, having been promoted to the captaincy in May,
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
this office, and in carrying out this order you are authorized to employ such service and use such means as you may deem expedient and proper for its faithful execution. You will likewise report frequently to this office as you progress with your work. I am sir, etc., L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. On the 14th of July, 1861, Nelson in a letter from Cincinnati reported what had been done toward carrying out the foregoing instructions. He said that he had appointed Speed S. Fry, of Danville, to be colonel of the First regiment of infantry in the proposed expedition to Tennessee; Theophilus T. Garrard, of Clay county, colonel of the Second; Thomas E. Bramlette, of Adair county, colonel of the Third; and Frank Wolford, of Casey county to be lieutenant-colonel of the cavalry regiment authorized, reserving the colonelcy for W. J. Landram, who served in a cavalry regiment during the war with Mexico. He stated also that runners had been started in all directions, and that thirty co
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
eration with General Smith their Wide separation messages to Smith visit to Danville, Lexington and Frankfort inauguration of Governor Hawes Buell's arrival in ving General Polk in command of the army, he made a tour of inspection through Danville via Springfield and Perryville to Lexington, and thence to Frankfort, where, been directed in case of an advance in force to fall back in the direction of Danville, with a view of covering Camp Dick Robinson (renamed by the Confederates Camp proaching, fell back to Perryville, ten miles equidistant from Harrodsburg and Danville. General Bragg mistook the movement of Sill's division to mean that Frankfortho did not think Bragg would make a stand at Perryville, and was moving toward Danville with a view to flank Bragg and get in his rear, as had been done with him by B General McCook to move from Bloomfield by way of Mackville and Harrodsburg to Danville, expecting Sill's division to rejoin the corps at Harrodsburg. The appearance
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
d to a decisive battle. It was expected that General Buell would advance to the attack, and on the 10th than eligible line of battle was formed awaiting his advance. Bragg then had of all arms an army of 40,000 men, and should have fought. At a distance of two or three miles the Federal army was also in line, to the south of Harrodsburg, both armies facing each other as if ready for the conflict; but neither advanced, a heavy rain supervening. General Buell had swung around and occupied Danville, and Bragg, fearing that he would seize upon his depot of supplies at Bryantsville, twelve or fourteen miles east of Harrodsburg, or cut off his communications with Cumberland Gap, instead of following him marched for Bryantsville on the morning of the 11th, and by the time he reached that point the enemy occupied Harrodsburg. The retreat from Kentucky had virtually begun. A council of war was held at Bryantsville. Added to his own condition as the result of Perryville, came news of t
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
without rank on the staff of Gen. J. S. Williams. Gen. Basil Duke, in an article on John Morgan in 1864, makes mention of Crittenden as in southwest Virginia assisting Morgan in defeating a raiding force led by General Averell. In his rank as colonel, C. S. A., he was put in temporary command of the department of Western Virginia and East Tennessee, May 31, 1864. After the war he returned to Kentucky and lived mostly at Frankfort. He was State librarian from 1867 to 1871. He died at Danville, Ky., November 27, 1880. General Crittenden had a brother, Thomas L., who sided with the Union, and rose to distinction as a major-general. Brigadier-General Basil Duke Brigadier-General Basil Duke, colonel of the Second Kentucky cavalry in John H. Morgan's lifetime, and successor to that officer upon his death, appears first upon the scene of action in the great civil war as a captain in Missouri and commissioned by the governor of that State to go to Montgomery, Ala., and obtain arms
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