Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Danville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Danville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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d Loudon Railroad, valued at about $10,000. Expedition, the first number of the soldiers' newspaper, printed by the Pennsylvania Fifth Regiment, appeared this evening. It is printed in fine style on the old Alexandria Sentinel press, and is full of interesting information regarding the condition of the soldiers, &c. It is edited by Lieutenant Ely, of Lebanon county. Several columns are devoted to German literature.--N. Y. Courier and Enquirer, June 10. In the last number of the Danville (Ky.) Review, Rev. Dr. Breckinridge discusses the southern rebellion in temperate but forcible language. He traces the origin and progress of the insurrection, and demonstrates not only that the rebel leaders are bent upon the accomplishment of selfish ends, but that the latent loyalty of the masses of the southern people needs but the protection of the Federal Government to be able to assert itself, to the utter discomfiture of Jeff. Davis and his fellows. Dr. Breckinridge is the uncle of t
paid by the Government, under such stipulations and conditions as may be deemed advisable, with a view to protect our commerce and mercantile interests of such of our citizens as may be considered loyal and patriotic, in behalf of the Government of the United States, who are desirous of the maintenance of the Constitution, the Union, and the laws of our country. To-day two hundred and forty fugitives from East Tennessee, men driven from their homes, were fed in the Seminary yard in Danville, Ky. Some of them were elderly men and some young, and all had been compelled to abandon their families, and were ill-clad, almost barefoot, weary, and hungry. The whole of the two hundred and forty fugitives enlisted in the United States service at Camp Dick Robinson, in Kentucky.--Louisville Journal. The office of the Sentinel at Easton, Pa., was destroyed by a crowd of Unionists.--Philadelphia Press, August 20. The town of Commerce, Mo., forty miles from Cairo, Ill., which was t
e time, and for the prosecution of the war to a successful termination, and for such a purpose would put forth every exertion.--Buffalo Courier, September 9. At Louisville J. S. Jackson issued a spirited call for a regiment of Kentucky cavalry, under authority of the United States, for three years or during the war.--(Doc. 39.) A Union meeting, called by four hundred men of all parties, who believe in a vigorous prosecution of the war and sustaining the Administration, was held at Danville, Conn., this afternoons About fifteen hundred persons were present. Strong resolutions were adopted, with great cheering. A prudential committee of ten was appointed. Speeches were made by Hon. R. Averill and Samuel T. Seely, D. D., of Albany.--N. Y. Times, Sept. 9. At Newark, New Jersey, Edward P. Wilder, engineer, aged forty-five, was arrested to-day and sent to Fort Lafayette. Intercepted letters exposed him. He was making a rifle battery to send South, and expressed a willingne
November 12. Three regiments, and two companies of cavalry, and a battery of artillery, were sent from Bowling Green in the direction of Scottsville, Ky., supposed for Gen. Zollicoffer's relief. This movement originated in the report of an advance by the National troops on Danville.--Bowling Green Courier, Nov. 12. Judge Haliburton, of the Confederate District Court at Richmond, charged a Grand Jury on the law of treason, and described as alien enemies all citizens of the United States, except citizens of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, and the District of Columbia. --(Doc. 153.) Thirty-seven contraband negroes arrived at Philadelphia, Pa., having walked northward from Accomac County on the peninsula of Virginia. They were supplied with money by the Wisconsin troops. Numbers of these people are constantly arriving at Philadelphia, which has stimulated a public meeting to be held to assist thousand soldiers have been entertained at the them.--Boston Transcrip
under. --(Doc. 186.) Lieut. J. L. Barnes, Missouri Volunteers, met D. R. Barclay, Confederate Commissioner, in St. Louis, and arranged for the exchange of the Union men taken prisoners by the rebels at Lexington, and the rebels taken prisoners at Camp Jackson by Gen. Lyon.--St. Louis Democrat. The steamer Constitution and Forest City, with the van of Gen. Butler's expedition, sailed from Portland, Maine.--Boston Post, Nov. 25. Public notice was given that Government will give the pay of U. S. soldiers who are prisoners of war to persons presenting written authority from the prisoner to draw his pay, or, without such authority, to his wife, the guardian of his minor children, or his widowed mother. --(Doc. 187.) Gen. Thomas, in command of the left wing of the Union army in Kentucky, advanced his entire force from Danville to Columbia in Adair Co.--The Fifty-ninth regiment N. Y. S. V., Col. W. L. Tidball, left New York City for the seat of war.--N. Y. Herald, Nov. 30.
were driven for a distance of ten miles. On arriving at the bridge, another party of rebels were encountered, who, after a short fight, were dispersed. Besides destroying the bridge, the Unionists cut the telegraph wire and destroyed the battery at the station.--(Doc. 149.) A party of rebel guerrillas entered Memphis, Mo., captured the militia troops stationed there, drove out the Union men, and robbed the stores. Great excitement existed in Louisville, Lexington, Bowling Green, Danville, Frankfort, Covington, and other towns in Kentucky, in anticipation of a visit from the rebel guerrillas under John Morgan. In order to be prepared for such an event, General Boyle, commanding the Union forces at Louisville, issued the following order: It is ordered that every able-bodied man take arms and aid in repelling the marauders. Every man who does not join will remain in his house forty-eight hours, and be shot down if he leaves it. General Ward, commanding at Lexington, issued
Twentieth regiment, New York State volunteers, left Rondout for the seat of war, under the command of Col. George H. Sharp.--The Fourteenth regiment of Connecticut left Hartford for Washington. It was commanded by Col. Dwight Morris.--Two hundred guerrillas, encamped on Shelby farm, six miles from Danville, Ky., were surprised by a party of the Harrodsburgh and Danville home guards, who succeeded in killing three and wounding several of them, besides capturing a number of horses.--(Doc. 193.)d Twentieth regiment, New York State volunteers, left Rondout for the seat of war, under the command of Col. George H. Sharp.--The Fourteenth regiment of Connecticut left Hartford for Washington. It was commanded by Col. Dwight Morris.--Two hundred guerrillas, encamped on Shelby farm, six miles from Danville, Ky., were surprised by a party of the Harrodsburgh and Danville home guards, who succeeded in killing three and wounding several of them, besides capturing a number of horses.--(Doc. 193.)
ander Scott, while lying off Cape Fear River, North-Carolina, was fired into by a rebel battery of two Armstrong guns, which the rebels had constructed on the beach during the night. The second shell struck the ship and exploded, killing two and wounding five. After which, the Maratanza immediately got under weigh and stood out to sea.--Com. Scott's Despatch. Yesterday a body of Union cavalry captured fifty wagons laden with ammunition, on the road between Camp Dick Robinson and Danville, Kentucky, and to-day a portion of General Dumont's forces captured at Versailles, Kentucky, a train of wagons, two pieces of artillery, and three hundred and fifty rebels, without a fight. The preamble and resolution, submitted to the rebel House of Representatives by Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, concerning the retaliatory measures to be adopted against the Government of the United States, passed the House by a vote of thirty-five yeas to twenty-two nays.--(Doc. 35.) The schooner Re
and partially destroyed by fire.--Leavenworth Conservative. A skirmish took place to-day at Barbee's Cross-Roads, Virginia, between a force of Union troops, under the command of General Pleasanton, and a detachment of General Stuart's rebel cavalry, resulting in the retreat of the latter with considerable loss.--(Doc. 29.) Salem, Virginia, was occupied by the National cavalry under General Bayard.--Curran Pope, Colonel of the Fifteenth regiment of Kentucky volunteers, died at Danville, Kentucky.--This day, while a battalion of General Shackleford's cavalry, under the command of Major Holloway, was moving from Henderson to Bowling Green, Kentucky, a party of rebel guerrillas under Johnson attempted to surprise them, on the Greenville road, about seven miles from Madisonville. The attack was promptly met by the National forces, and the rebels were routed with the loss of eight killed and a large number wounded and captured. Colonel Fowler, who commanded the guerrillas, was am