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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
s line of march, was on a road which runs due east from Lebanon to Danville. At a point about five miles south-west of Perryville this road I explained, also, that Thomas and Crittenden on the Lebanon and Danville road could easily gain our rear, while all our forces were engaged of our troops engaged with Gilbert's corps. If he kept on toward Danville and Camp Dick Robinson, our position would be turned, and a rapid cted with the cavalry to prevent an advance on the road leading to Danville. At midnight the troops withdrew to Perryville, and at sunrise covision of infantry and a brigade of cavalry fought me back to near Danville, and at the same time Buell formed with his right within four milelarge in proportion to other arms. The enemy pushed up close to Danville on the night of the 10th, but we easily held him in check until alally pressed us so warmly that we were compelled to retire east of Danville. Here the enemy was again driven back, and we held our position n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
he 7th. The strength of the opposition to Sill and the continued presence of Kirby Smith about Frankfort pointed to a concentration in that direction, at least north of Perryville; but on the 6th the information was that Smith was moving upon Danville. McCook, who had been halted momentarily at Bloomfield until the question should be developed, was therefore directed on Harrodsburg, and Sill was ordered to join him by forced marches. During the night the information in regard to Smith was card learned that it belonged to a company of pork-packers, who profess to be Union men. I therefore concluded not to send or seize it, as we can get it at any time by sending for it. Maxey's brigade is also reported as leaving Lebanon to-day for Danville, via Bradfordsville and Hustonville, with a train loaded with flour and pork from Lebanon. Shall I send and intercept him now, or capture him hereafter? Very respectfully, Geo. H. Thomas. saying that finding no water at that point he would