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mas A. Henderson fell, mortally wounded, at Deep Bottom. The regiment participated in the successf Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 4 Deep Bottom, Va., July 29, 1864 2 Sailor's Creek, Va., Apr Siege of Petersburg, Va. 11 26 8 45 Deep Bottom, Va., August 14-18, 1864 1 5   6 Ream's Star Oaks, Glendale; Totopotomoy; Cold Harbor; Deep Bottom (1 Co.); Peeble's Farm. notes.--Recruite Present, also, at North Anna; Totopotomoy; Deep Bottom; Strawberry Plains; Hatcher's Run; Farmvill Run; North Anna; Totopotomoy; Cold Harbor; Deep Bottom; Peebles's Farm; Boydton Road. notes.--O, Va., June 22, 1864 8 Glendale, Va. 8 Deep Bottom, Va. 1 Chantilly, Va. 1 Ream's Station, Va.m Road, Va. 5 Po River, Va., May 10 37 Deep Bottom, Va. 8 Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 29 Ream's regiment encountered more hard fighting at Deep Bottom, August 16, 1864, where it captured an eartberry Plains, Va. 1 Gettysburg, Pa. 11 Deep Bottom, Va. 2 Wapping Heights, Va. 1 Boydton Road,[70 more...]
4 136 13th West Virginia Duval's Eighth 14 50 15 79 23d Illinois Mulligan's Eighth 14 63 37 114 10th West Virginia Mulligan's Eighth 12 57 43 112 Deep Bottom, Va. Or, First Deep Bottom.             July 26-29, 1864.             110th Pennsylvania Birney's Second 7 24 -- 31 11th Maine Terry's Tenth 3 29 -- 3Deep Bottom.             July 26-29, 1864.             110th Pennsylvania Birney's Second 7 24 -- 31 11th Maine Terry's Tenth 3 29 -- 32 16th Penn. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry A. P. 5 29 2 36 2d U. S. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry A. P. 4 16 5 25 Petersburg Mine, Va.             July 30, 1864.             23d U. S. Colored Ferrero's In comparing losses in this engagement, it should be understood that this was the first action in which the colored troops ofird 34 57 9 100 8th Tennessee Cox's Twenty-third 25 56 13 94 112th Illinois Cox's Twenty-third 12 58 1 71 38th Ohio Baird's Fourteenth 13 43 6 62 Deep Bottom, Va.             August 14-16, 1864.             11th Maine Terry's Tenth 20 121 6 147 24th Massachusetts Terry'
of the entire loss in action of this class of troops. The regiments of Ferrero's Division sustained almost all their losses at the Mine Explosion and in the trenches before Petersburg. This division was also engaged at the Boydton Road, but with slight loss. The casualties in Paine's (formerly Hinks's) Division occurred in the first assault on Petersburg, June 15, 1864, at Chaffin's Farm, and at the Darbytown Road (Fair Oaks, 1864). The principal loss in Hawley's Division occurred at Deep Bottom, and Chaffin's Farm (Fort Gilmer). The most of those killed in the 73d fell in the assault on Port Hudson; and the killed in the 2d Infantry, at Natural Bridge, Va. Eleven officers of the latter regiment, including the Colonel and Chaplain, died of disease at Key West, Fla., in the summer of 1864. There is no satisfactory explanation for the surprising mortality in the 5th Colored Heavy Artillery, and 65th Colored Infantry. The former regiment was recruited in Louisiana and Missis
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
ewry's Bluff, Va. Front Royal, Va. Richmond, Ky. Monocacy, Md. Port Republic, Va. Fredericksburg, Va. Brice's Cross Roads, Miss. Wilson's Creek, Mo. Chancellorsville, Va. Island Ford, Va. Pocotaligo, S. C. Winchester, Va. (1863). Deep Bottom, Va. Maryland Heights, Md. Chickamauga, Ga. Ream's Station, Va. Shepherdstown, Va. Olustee, Fla. Hatcher's Run, Va. New Market, Va. Sabine Cross Roads, La.   In the following assaults the Confederates successfully repulsed the atta1,203 July 26-29 Strawberry Plains, Va 62 340 86 488 July 30 Petersburg Mine, Va 504 1,881 1,413 3,798 July 1-31 Petersburg Trenches, Va 349 1,587 145 2,081 Aug. 11 Cavalry engagements.White Post, Va 30 70 200 300 Aug. 14-16 Deep Bottom, Va 327 1,851 721 2,899 Aug. 18-20 Weldon Railroad, Va 251 1,148 2,879 4,278 Aug. 24 Halltown, Va 9 37 16 62 Aug. 25 Ream's Station, Va 140 529 2,073 2,742 Aug. 25 Cavalry engagements.Smithfield, Va 20 61 100 181 Aug. 26 Hal
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ford Killed at Wilderness. Brigadier-General Abner Perrin Killed at Spotsylvania. Brigadier-General Julius Daniel Killed at Spotsylvania. Brigadier-General James B. Gordon Killed at Yellow Tavern. Brigadier-General George Doles Killed at Bethesda Church. Brigadier-General W. E. Jones Killed at Piedmont. Brigadier-General C. H. Stevens Killed at Peach Tree Creek. Brigadier-General Samuel Benton Killed at Ezra Church. Brigadier-General John R. Chambliss, Jr Killed at Deep Bottom. Brigadier-General J. C. Saunders Killed at Weldon Railroad. Brigadier-General Robert H. Anderson Killed at Jonesboro. Brigadier-General John Morgan Killed at Greenville, Tenn. Brigadier-General Archibald C. Godwin Killed at Opequon. Brigadier-General John Dunnovant Killed at Vaughn Road. Brigadier-General John Gregg Killed at Darbytown Road. Brigadier-General Stephen Elliott, Jr Mortally wounded. Killed at Petersburg. Brigadier-General Victor J. Girardey Killed
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
d their object. The enemy had lately sent a large part of their force to head off Hancock at Deep Bottom, across the James, a movement that had seriously alarmed them. So the forces in our front we not get him off. All was quiet this morning towards the railroad. Mott Ordered back from Deep Bottom. got in, Jerusalem plank road and Weldon railroad through the mud, about seven, and begant! --Lyman's Journal. August 20, 1864 A brigade of cavalry passed last night, coming from Deep Bottom, and reported this morning to General Warren, to cover his flank and rear, and help destroy tbe! August 21, 1864 Last night, Hancock, with his two remaining divisions, marched from Deep Bottom and took position on our left, ready to support Warren. The long, rapid marches of this Corp the troops were those of Beauregard and A. P. Hill, many of which had been concentrated from Deep Bottom. They first opened a heavy artillery fire from behind the woods, throwing most of the projec
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
here lay the familiar forms of Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan and Major Mitchell, on some boards, trying to make up for their loss of sleep. The cheery Hancock was awake and lively. We here were near the point of the railroad, which excited General Meade's indignation by its exposure. Now they have partly sunk it and partly built a bank, on the enemy's side, so that it is covered from fire. Here we got news that Ord and Birney had crossed the James, the first near Dutch Gap, the other near Deep Bottom, and advanced towards Richmond. Birney went up the New-market road, took a line of works, and joined Ord, who took a strong line, with a fort, on Chapin's farm, which is before Chapin's bluff, which again is opposite Fort Darling. We got sixteen guns, including three of heavy calibre, also some prisoners. General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest beyond, which I do not think we attacked at all. We went down then to the Jones hou
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
ry high and complimentary. The old book tells us, he said, that the race may not be to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, and we feel that Providence will not desert our righteous cause. Yes, said General Meade, but then we feel that Providence will not desert our cause; now how are you going to settle that question? Whereat they both laughed. The bishop was a scholastic, quiet-looking man, and no great fire-eater, I fancy. The boat made fast at Aiken's landing, halfway between Deep Bottom and Dutch Gap. A Staff officer was there to receive us and conduct us, two miles, to General Butler's Headquarters. Some rode and some were in ambulances. The James Army people always take pretty good care of themselves, and here I found log houses, with board roofs, and high chimneys, for the accommodation of the gentlemen of the Staff. You might know it was Butler's Headquarters by the fact that, instead of the common ensign, he had a captured Reb battle-flag stuck up! This chiefta
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
was still unwilling to report him, as I ought to have done, to be relieved by the lieutenant-general; and so I attempted to remain, as I had been, on friendly terms with him. Although, in order to get rid of my orders to make the attack on Petersburg, he had misrepresented a fact to me, I concluded to overlook it. We went on, nothing coming up to cause any disagreement until a demonstration was ordered by General Grant to be made from Bermuda Hundred across the James to seize and hold Deep Bottom. This was to be done by a surprise early in the morning, and I ordered that the movement should be made by the several divisions of the Tenth and Eighteenth Corps at daybreak. Colonel Foster of the Tenth Corps got there with his troops in time, and the movement was successful. Late that morning I saw General Martindale's brigade pass my headquarters, having to march a large seven miles before he could reach with his command the point at which he was to take part in the movement. If
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
side of the James River at a point known as Deep Bottom. General Grant wanted to get north of the Jtransported from City Point by the river to Deep Bottom. At the same time I ordered General Birney the peninsula of Bermuda Hundred, cross at Deep Bottom on the pontoon bridge there,--rode up to myss the James River by the pontoon bridge at Deep Bottom, which, for reasons that need not be discusth the exception of the colored division at Deep Bottom, will move across that bridge and make an a Buffin's house in front of our position at Deep Bottom. They are there joined by Bennings' (oldsion requires. Hospital boats will be at Deep Bottom for the purpose of receiving any wounded. om a point opposite Aikens' Landing down to Deep Bottom. There was no more appearance of the propoross was performed. I had sent an aid to Deep Bottom, and he met me half way coming back to say g the prisoners were marched under guard to Deep Bottom. I sent for my headquarters guard, however[8 more...]
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