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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ed in the brilliant scheme of Pourtales Steiger to seize the chateau of Neufchatel on behalf of the King of Prussia. Consequently he since has retired to this country and has now a position as examiner at the Patent Office. Mr. Otto was really encouraging to look at. He did not chew tobacco, or talk politics, or use bad grammar; but was well educated and spake French and German. General Butler, having a luminous idea to get above the Howlett house batteries by cutting a ship canal across Dutch Gap, has called for volunteers, at an increased rate of pay. Whereupon the Rebel rams come down and shell the extra-pay volunteers, with their big guns; and we hear the distant booming very distinctly. I think when Butler gets his canal cleverly through, he will find fresh batteries, ready to rake it, and plenty more above it, on the river. The Richmond papers make merry, and say it will increase their commerce. August 14, 1864 . . . General Parke got back from his sick leave and took co
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
re struck and packed, and there lay the familiar forms of Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan and Major Mitchell, on some boards, trying to make up for their loss of sleep. The cheery Hancock was awake and lively. We here were near the point of the railroad, which excited General Meade's indignation by its exposure. Now they have partly sunk it and partly built a bank, on the enemy's side, so that it is covered from fire. Here we got news that Ord and Birney had crossed the James, the first near Dutch Gap, the other near Deep Bottom, and advanced towards Richmond. Birney went up the New-market road, took a line of works, and joined Ord, who took a strong line, with a fort, on Chapin's farm, which is before Chapin's bluff, which again is opposite Fort Darling. We got sixteen guns, including three of heavy calibre, also some prisoners. General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest beyond, which I do not think we attacked at all. We went
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
ert our cause; now how are you going to settle that question? Whereat they both laughed. The bishop was a scholastic, quiet-looking man, and no great fire-eater, I fancy. The boat made fast at Aiken's landing, halfway between Deep Bottom and Dutch Gap. A Staff officer was there to receive us and conduct us, two miles, to General Butler's Headquarters. Some rode and some were in ambulances. The James Army people always take pretty good care of themselves, and here I found log houses, with said to me: Who are those men just over there? When I told him they were Rebs, he exclaimed: God bless me! and popped down behind the parapet. . . . Thence we all went to view the great canal. You will notice on the map, that the river at Dutch Gap makes a wide loop and comes back to nearly the same spot, and the canal is going through there. This cuts off five or six miles of river and avoids that much of navigation exposed to fire; and it may have strategic advantages if we can get iro
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
t. The proclamation also threatened that no officer would be paroled until I was punished by hanging. Yet the parole went on in all the armies precisely as though the proclamation had never been published. And when in Virginia, in 1864, a portion of my colored troops raised in Virginia were captured and put by Lee into the trenches to work on the rebel fortifications, I wrote him a note stating that if they were not immediately taken out and treated as prisoners of war, I would put in Dutch Gap to work, under the fire of the rebels, the Virginia reserves whom I had captured, who were highly respectable gentlemen of Richmond, over sixty years of age. It is needless to say that afterwards the negroes were treated as prisoners of war. Jefferson Davis did not believe one word of the proclamation himself. That is evinced by the fact that while that document declared me to be utterly vile and a felon, yet he treats me quite differently in his Rise and fall of the Confederate gove
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
by the Government of the United States. Being assured by General Ewell, commanding Confederate forces on the north side of the James, that an answer to this communication, if any, would be sent by 11 o'clock A. M., to-day and it being now past 12 (noon) and no answer having been received, It is ordered: That an equal number of prisoners of war, preferably members of the Virginia reserves, by and under whose charge this outrage is being carried on, be set to work in the excavation at Dutch Gap, and elsewhere along the trenches, as may hereafter seem best, in retaliation for this unjust treatment of the soldiers of the United States so kept at labor and service by the Confederate authorities. It being also testified to by the same witnesses, that the rations served to the soldiers of the United States so at labor is one pound of flour and one third of a pound of bacon daily, it is ordered that the same ration precisely be served to these Confederate prisoners so kept at work,
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
d and fifty (450) men for duty, with its pickets advanced beyond Cox's overseer's house toward Dutch Gap, holding the line nearly three quarters of a mile beyond that point to a point near the Varinach he might ascend the James with his vessels, which were then lying below at the point called Dutch Gap, to the defences of Richmond. Here is a peculiar formation: The river running up by Trent'sly about four hundred and twenty-five feet from the water on the upper side across the neck at Dutch Gap to twenty-five feet of water on the lower side. So a canal wide and deep enough for our gunboe premises. This they did, and made a very careful exploration of the point. It was known as Dutch Gap for the reason that some enterprising German had cut down quite a gap in undertaking to build ence was changed to a lighter punishment by Gideon Welles, who thought cowardice excusable. Dutch Gap has since been dredged out, and is the main channel of commerce between Richmond and the outer
it is ordered, that the prisoners of war of the Confederate forces put to work in the canal at Dutch Gap, in retaliation, shall be at once withdrawn and sent to Point Lookout, to be held and treated er, in the event of such an alarm, would be very serious. I would suggest Trent's Reach, or Dutch Gap, as a good location for such obstructions. I do not see clearly how such a movement can be l corps in operation along James River. I would respectfully suggest that the occupation of Dutch Gap, which is high and narrow, could be a great advantage to us, and that a body of skirmishers, t Atlantic Block. Squad. P. S. 4 P. M. The rebel artillery has appeared on the heights at Dutch Gap. S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral. [no. 47. see page 651.] Washington, D. C., May 13, 1864, hdraw from north of the James, you abandon all of your present lines except at Deep Bottom and Dutch Gap. Just occupy what you did prior to the movement which secured our present position. Preparat
th Hancock, 877. Barker, Jacob, advances money at New Orleans, 383. Barnard, General, reference to, 666; examines Dutch Gap, 744; approves cutting Dutch Gap Canal, 747; examines Butler's Department, 832; in Grant's personal Memoirs, 856; origiurprising fortifications, 721; at Fort Harrison, 734, 735, 736; returns to City Point, 736; reference to, 738; examines Dutch Gap, 744; directs Butler to dig canal at Dutch Gap, 744; desires to use canal, 750; visited by Butler on way to Fortress MoDutch Gap, 744; desires to use canal, 750; visited by Butler on way to Fortress Monroe, 752; telegram from Butler, 753; urges the return of troops sent to New York, 773; complimentary telegram to Stanton, 771; reference to, as Lincoln's successor, 773; proposes a reconnoissance of Fort Fisher, 774; quoted upon the Wilmington expeodist Church divided by slavery question, 143. Mexican War, Grant in, 868. Michie, Maj. Peter S., directs work at Dutch Gap, 747. Military Training, Butler's, 123,125. Military Commission defined, 842-843; Butler suggests that Davis be t
considered as exchanged and absolved from his parole until his equivalent has actually reached the line of his friends. 5. That the parole forbids the performance of field, garrison, police or guard or constabulary duty. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General Confederate States Army. Supplementary articles. art. 7. All prisoners of war now held on either side, and all prisoners hereafter taken, shall be sent with all reasonable despatch to A. H. Aikins, below Dutch Gap, on the James River, in Virginia, or to Vicksburgh, on the Mississippi River, in the State of Mississippi, and there exchanged, or paroled until such exchange can be effected, notice being previously given by each party of the number of prisoners it will send, and the time when they will be delivered at those points respectively; and in case the vicissitudes of war shall change the military relations of the places designated in this article to the contending parties, so as to render the sa
considered as exchanged and absolved from his parole until his equivalent has actually reached the line of his friends. 5. That the parole forbids the performance of field, garrison, police or guard or constabulary duty. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General Confederate States Army. Supplementary articles. art. 7. All prisoners of war now held on either side, and all prisoners hereafter taken, shall be sent with all reasonable despatch to A. H. Aikins, below Dutch Gap, on the James River, in Virginia, or to Vicksburgh, on the Mississippi River, in the State of Mississippi, and there exchanged, or paroled until such exchange can be effected, notice being previously given by each party of the number of prisoners it will send, and the time when they will be delivered at those points respectively; and in case the vicissitudes of war shall change the military relations of the places designated in this article to the contending parties, so as to render the sa
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