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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
nst Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of Bermuda Hundred and City Point, Va., May 5. Action at Swift Creek (or Arrowfield Church) May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Clover Hill Station May 14. Operations about Bermuda Hundred May 16-June 15. Petersburg June 9. Bermuda Hundred front June 16-17. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Deep Bottom July 27. Dutch Gap August 13. Before Petersburg September 2-10. Battle of Chaffin's Farm September 28-30. Darbytown Road October 7. In trenches before Richmond till April, 1865. Occupation of Richmond April 3. Duty at Petersburg, City Point and Richmond till June, Mustered out June 11, 1865. Battery lost during service 2 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 26 Enlisted men by disease. Total 28. 1st New Jersey Regiment Infantry. 3 months. Organized at Trenton, N. J., and
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
May 10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Port Walthall Junction May 16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-27. Moved to White House, thence to Cold Harbor May 28-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16 to December 7. In trenches before Petersburg and on the Bermuda Hundred front till August. Demonstration north of the James August 13-20. Dutch Gap August 13. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Battle of Chafflin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. In trenches before Richmond till December 7. Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Cape Fear Intrenchments February 11-13. Sugar Loaf Battery February 11. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Capture of Wilming
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
October, 1864. Provisional Brigade, Army of the James, to November, 1864. Provisional Brigade, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 9th Army Corps, to May, 1865. Service. Duty near Dutch Gap, Va., with Army of the James September 11 to November 28, 1864. Repulse of attack November 19. Transferred to Army of the Potomac November 28. Siege of Petersburg December, 1864, to April, 1865. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February y of the James, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Corps, Army of the James, to December, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 24th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Service. Duty with Engineer Corps engaged in fatigue duty at Dutch Gap, Va., till October 26, 1864. Duty in trenches before Richmond north of the James till April, 1865. Occupation of Richmond April 3. (Temporarily attached to Devens' 3rd Division, March 27 to April 22.) Provost duty at Richmond till May.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16 to December 7. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30. Dutch Gap September 7. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. 5-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Deep Bottom August 24. Dutch Gap August 24. Demonstration north of the James River September 28-30. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, ril 2, 1865. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 29-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Dutch Gap November 17. Indiantown, Sandy Creek, N. C., December 18 (Detachment). Duty north of James River before Richmond 65. Operations on north side of the James River before Richmond October 27-28, 1864. Fatigue duty at Deep Bottom, Dutch Gap and in trenches before Richmond till March, 1865. Moved to Hatcher's Run March 27-28. Appomattox Campaign March 2
d movement, to obtain possession of the Danville Railroad. Lee's army was to be attacked by the Army of the Potomac, and the railroad taken if possible, while the Army of the James was to operate on that side, and prevent reinforcements being sent to Lee, and to take advantage of circumstances. As General Butler and staff were expected in the evening, I concluded to remain for the present where I was. It rained during the whole of the afternoon, and part of the evening. The celebrated Dutch Gap, where General Butler is making a canal, is about a mile and a half from headquarters; a rebel battery on the opposite side of the James, in a thick wood, keeps up a fire upon it during the day and night. I had a strong curiosity to see the Gap; and, as there had been no firing for an hour, Captain Sealy thought it had ceased for the afternoon. Accordingly, I set off on horseback with an orderly, to see the famous canal. I got within a quarter of a mile of it, when a report was heard, t
the Admiral replied, in substance, that owing to shoal water in Trent Reach, as shown by coast-survey chart, the draft of the monitors, and rebel torpedoes, it would be very difficult, if not impracticable, at present, to get up as high as Dr. Howlett's farm. In order to thoroughly remove obstructions, it would be necessary to control the left bank. The enemy now occupy, in considerable force, the high ground on the left bank, around Jones' Neck, and the same difficulty will be found at Dutch Gap. This occupancy would interrupt the supply of coal for the monitors. The Admiral, however, promised all possible aid and support, and would at least protect the river line below where the fleet now lies (Four Mile Creek). A despatch has since been received that he has started to move up, and will come as far as possible. in camp, Tuesday Morning, May 17, 1864. The hardest fighting of the campaign on the south side of the James river occurred yesterday. In the early morning, under co
be considered as exchanged and absolved from his parole until his equivalent has actually reached the lines of his friends. 5th. That the parole forbids the performance of field, garrison, police, or guard, or constabulary duty. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General, C. S. A. Supplementary articles. Article VII: All prisoners of war now held on either side, and all prisoners hereafter taken, shall be sent, with all reasonable despatch, to A. M. Aiken's, below Dutch Gap, on the James River, in Virginia, or to Vicksburg, on the Mississippi River, in the State of Mississippi, and there exchanged or paroled until such exchange can be effected, notice being previously given by each party of the number of prisoners it will send, and the time when they will be delivered at those points respectively; and in case the vicissitudes of war shall change the military relations of the places designated in this article to the contending parties, so as to render the same
v., vol. 144, p. 244. — – July. Gen. Butler reinstated. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 801. — – Aug. Canal at Dutch Gap. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 849. — – Aug. Disapproves proceedings in the case of Brig.-Gen. E. A. Wild, tried, pp. 36, 71, 91. — Twenty months in the department of the gulf, rev. of. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 3, p. 36. Dutch Gap, Va. 1865. Full description of canal. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 313. — Canal; effect of rain there and elsevy Journal, vol. 2, pp. 249, 265. —Vidette experience, June, 1864. Bivouac, vol. 3, p. 293. Petersburg Canal. Dutch Gap, Aug. 10, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 849. —Full description. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 313. —Effect of rain at Dutch Gap and elsewhere along the James river, Jan., 1865. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, pp. 338, 353. Petersburg Crater, July 30, 1864. Anecdote. Century, vol. 35, p. 323. —Choice of division to lead
er A. P. Hill, extended the Confederate right, on the south of Petersburg, to the Weldon & Petersburg railroad. Pickett's division took up the line on the west side of the Appomattox and extended it north to the James, at the big bend opposite Dutch gap. The fortifications on the north of the James, from Chaffin's bluff northward, along the front of Richmond, were held by batteries and by local troops, in command of Lieut.-Gen. R. S. Ewell. Subsequently the Confederate works were extended toed by all means known to the art of war, extended for nearly 40 miles. The Federal fortifications, commencing on the river road north of the James, in front of the Confederate lines, extended for four miles to the south, to Fort Brady, above Dutch gap; then were resumed, opposite the big bend of the James, and extended across the neck of the Bermuda Hundred peninsula, for nearly four miles, to the big bend of the Appomattox; then again resumed, upon the south side of that river and along its
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ester, Kernstown, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Newtown, Stevenson's Depot, Darkville, Strasburg, Rappahannock Station, Brandy Station, Culpeper, Orange Court House, Gordonsville, Trevilian Station, New Market, Lacy's Springs, Waynesboro, Sylvan Grove, Panther Gap, Buffalo Gap, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Beaver Dam Station, South and North Anna rivers, Cold Harbor, Hawe's Shop, Gaines' Mill, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Fort Darling, Drewry's Bluff, Hanover, Samaria Church, Dutch Gap, Gravelly Run, Deep Bottom, New market Heights, Chester Station, Swift Creek, Petersburg, Weldon Road, Lee's Mills, Ream's Station, Fort Hill, Poplar Springs, Arthur's Swamp, Darbytown Road, Hatcher's Run, Stony Creek, Dinwiddie Court House, Bermuda Hundred, Lynchburg, Otter Creek, Buford's Gap, in Virginia; and Wilcox .Bridge, Averasboro, Bentonville, and Durham Station, in North Carolina. He was wounded twice, severely, and was once captured in front of Petersburg, but escaped in the fo
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