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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
infantry April, 1863. Expedition to Middleton May 21-22. Middleton May 22. Shelbyville Pike June 4. Operations on Eaglesville Pike June 4. Near Murfreesboro June 6. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 22-July 7. Christiana June 24. Liberty Gap June 24-27. Tullahoma June 29-30. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Davis Ford, Chickamauga Creek, September 17. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-20. Mission Ridge September 22. Shallow Ford Road September 22. Companies L and M join September, 1863. Expedition to East Tennessee after Champ Ferguson September-October. Designation changed from 39th Infantry to 8th Cavalry October 15, 1863. Courier duty between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Ringgold, Ga., November-December. Operations about Sparta January 4-14, 1864. Mill Creek Gap February 25. Leet's Tan Yar
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
y Gap June 24-27. Occupation of Tullahoma July 1. Winchester July 3. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-20. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Pursuit to Ringgold November 26-27. Chickamauga Creek November 26. At Rossville, Ga., till March 21, 1864. Demonstration on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27, 1864. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Battery Veteranized March 21. Veterans on furlough April 11 to June 5. Non-Veterans attached to Battery I, 2nd Illinois Light Artillery. Battery mounted at Nashville, Tenn., and escort cattle and horses to army in the field till July 14, 1864. Moved to Chattanooga, Tenn., July 14-18. Moun
Stone's River December 28-30, 1862. Moved to Brentwood, Tenn., March, 1863, and duty there till June 5. Moved to Murfreesboro, Tenn., and duty there till July 16. Garrison duty at Nashville, Tenn., till August 20. March to Bridgeport, Ala., via Franklin, Columbia, Athens and Huntsville, August 20-September 14. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-21. Duty in Lookout Valley till November 6. (Temporarily attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 11th Army Corps.) At Chickamauga Creek till November 24. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 24-27. Tunnel Hill November 24-25. Mission Ridge November 25. Pursuit to Graysville November 26-27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 18. At North Chickamauga and McAffee's Church, Ga., till May, 1864. Demonstration on Dalton February 22-27. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September. Tunnel Hill May 6-7. D
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
22. Reconnoissance to Rock Island Ferry August 4-5. Sparta August 9. Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Calfkiller River near Sparta August 17. Ringgold, Ga., September 11. Pea Vine Ridge and Reed's Bridge, Chickamauga Creek, September 18. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Chickamauga Creek September 25. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October 17. Expedition from Maysville to Whitesburg and Decatur, Ala., November 14-17. SmChickamauga Creek September 25. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October 17. Expedition from Maysville to Whitesburg and Decatur, Ala., November 14-17. Smith's Expedition from Nashville to Corinth, Miss., December 28, 1863-January 8, 1864. Smith's Expedition from Colliersville, Tenn., to Okolona, Miss., February 11-26. Ivy's Farm near Okolona, Miss., February 22. Tallahatchie River February 22. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September, 1864. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Tanner's Bridge May 15. Near Rome May 15. Near Dallas May 24. About Dallas May 25-June 5. Near Big Shanty June 9. Operations against Kenesaw Mounta
Cavalry was all that I found on the mountain. As I reached the point of the mountain overlooking Chattanooga, the remainder of my brigade, with the first brigade, General Cruft's, and General Wood's division, were entering the city. I may here notice Captain Isaac N. Dryden, of the Twenty-fourth Ohio, and his company, for daring bravery in the advance, in ascending the mountain, and driving and punishing the enemy. With light but successful skirmishing near Graysville, Ringgold, and Chickamauga Creek, and a reconnoissance from the latter to Worthen's farm, to a pass in Pigeon Mountain, I was directed, on the morning of the nineteenth instant, to make a reconnoissance below Lee and Gordon's Mills, on the Chickamauga Creek, in the State of Georgia, which I did, and found the enemy in force, and on receiving orders I withdrew the brigade, joined the column, and with it moved upon the enemy, into an open woodland to the right of the road leading towards Chattanooga. My position happen
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 27: Chattanooga and the battle of Missionary Ridge (search)
tle longer for Hooker, who was on his other flank. What could that officer of unfailing energy be doing? Early in the day his flags were seen descending the Summertown road of old Lookout. But his columns had disappeared in the rolling valley, going toward Rossville. Could he have met with disaster? It was hardly possible. At last all apprehensions were relieved. A message arrived. Hooker, having the bridge ahead of him destroyed by the enemy, had been delayed by the impassable Chickamauga Creek. That odd stream had so many branches, and they were so crooked, that an officer could hardly tell on which side of the stream he was. It was deep and sluggish, with muddy banks. The Confederate General Breckinridge, who that day commanded Bragg's left, had greatly bothered Hooker's men, but the obstacle was finally overcome, a bridge was built and Hooker had passed over and was working up the slope of the south end of Missionary Ridge, and driving Breckinridge's advance before him.
onfederacy. The battle of Chickamauga. Chattanooga is one of the great gate-ways through the mountains to the champaign country of Georgia and Alabama. It is situated at the mouth of the valley formed by Lookout Mountain and the Missionary Ridge. The first-named eminence is a vast palisade of rocks, rising twenty-four hundred feet above the level of the sea, in abrupt, rocky cliffs, from a steep, wooded base. East of Missionary Ridge is another valley, following the course of Chickamauga Creek, and having its head in McLemore's Cove. Immediately after crossing the mountains to the Tennessee River, Rosecrans, who was moving with a force of effective infantry and artillery, amounting to fully seventy thousand men, threw a corps by way of Sequatchie Valley — a canon or deep cut splitting the Cumberland range parallel-hoping to strike the rear of Gen. Buckner's command, whilst Burnside occupied him in front. Buckner, however, was directed by Gen. Bragg to withdraw to the Hia
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
nd mountain to Trenton. He was on the flank of General Bragg by the 8th of September, and by the 12th had crossed Lookout mountain. Bragg, having left Chattanooga on the 8th, Rosecrans sent Crittenden's corps to occupy that place and move on the railroad as far as Ringgold, while Thomas and Mc-Cook took position in McLemore's cove and down as far as Alpine. Rosecrans' corps was widely separated and his wings were by road, 50 miles or more apart! Meanwhile Bragg was on the line of Chickamauga creek, with his left at Lafayette and his headquarters at Lee & Gordon's mills. General Gist's South Carolina brigade, with Ferguson's battery, was guarding his extreme left at Rome and supporting the cavalry in that quarter. Crittenden's corps at Ringgold and vicinity was at General Bragg's mercy. He was only 10 miles from Bragg's headquarters, with the Chickamauga between himself and Thomas, and by road at least 20 miles from that general's support. McCook was fully as far from Thomas
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
. He served in this rank at Williamsburg, and at Seven Pines was severely wounded, the injury keeping him out of action until just before the battle of Second Manassas, where he was knocked down by an exploding shell but escaped with severe bruises. As senior captain he commanded the Fifth regiment in the battles of Boonsboro and Sharpsburg and during the retreat to Virginia. During the Georgia campaign of Jenkins' brigade, he was dangerously wounded while assaulting a small fort on Chickamauga creek, just after the great battle there, and was compelled to lie in hospital at Atlanta for three months. He was not able to re-enter the active service until the day before the fight at Hanover Junction, Va., when he resumed command of his company, and continued on duty in all the battles of the brigade until the surrender at Appomattox. In November, 1864, he was promoted to major. Since the war he has been a resident of Rock Hill, mainly, and for fifteen years has served as deputy sher
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
uates Chattanooga the maneuvers in the mountains the two Days battle on Chickamauga Creek Rosecrans defeated and Penned in at Chattanooga. The operations in Te these valleys, McLemore's cove, which is traversed by the west branch of Chickamauga creek, and ends 25 miles below Chattanooga in a junction of the mountain ridgesgan moving west from Ringgold, and on the 12th he was at Gordon's mill on Chickamauga creek with his corps. Wilder's mounted brigade, covering the movement, had a ss pushed all his corps over the mountain and down into the cove and along Chickamauga creek northward, and Crittenden was ordered to post Wood at Gordon's mill, and onted Wood's division at Lee & Gordon's mill, the extreme Federal left on Chickamauga creek, his own right extended further northward, threatening the roads to Chatt sons. As before noted, Walker and his corps were on the Federal side of Chickamauga creek Friday night. Early next morning the battle was opened by the attack on F
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