Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for East Chickamauga Creek (Georgia, United States) or search for East Chickamauga Creek (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
nd mountain to Trenton. He was on the flank of General Bragg by the 8th of September, and by the 12th had crossed Lookout mountain. Bragg, having left Chattanooga on the 8th, Rosecrans sent Crittenden's corps to occupy that place and move on the railroad as far as Ringgold, while Thomas and Mc-Cook took position in McLemore's cove and down as far as Alpine. Rosecrans' corps was widely separated and his wings were by road, 50 miles or more apart! Meanwhile Bragg was on the line of Chickamauga creek, with his left at Lafayette and his headquarters at Lee & Gordon's mills. General Gist's South Carolina brigade, with Ferguson's battery, was guarding his extreme left at Rome and supporting the cavalry in that quarter. Crittenden's corps at Ringgold and vicinity was at General Bragg's mercy. He was only 10 miles from Bragg's headquarters, with the Chickamauga between himself and Thomas, and by road at least 20 miles from that general's support. McCook was fully as far from Thomas
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
. He served in this rank at Williamsburg, and at Seven Pines was severely wounded, the injury keeping him out of action until just before the battle of Second Manassas, where he was knocked down by an exploding shell but escaped with severe bruises. As senior captain he commanded the Fifth regiment in the battles of Boonsboro and Sharpsburg and during the retreat to Virginia. During the Georgia campaign of Jenkins' brigade, he was dangerously wounded while assaulting a small fort on Chickamauga creek, just after the great battle there, and was compelled to lie in hospital at Atlanta for three months. He was not able to re-enter the active service until the day before the fight at Hanover Junction, Va., when he resumed command of his company, and continued on duty in all the battles of the brigade until the surrender at Appomattox. In November, 1864, he was promoted to major. Since the war he has been a resident of Rock Hill, mainly, and for fifteen years has served as deputy sher