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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Matagorda Bay (Texas, United States) or search for Matagorda Bay (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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heir number wounded. A reconnoissance in force, under the command of Brigadier-General Ferry, was made from Suffolk, Virginia, to the Blackwater. At a place near the river, known as the Common Road Crossing, a small party of rebels were encountered, when a skirmish ensued, terminating in a retreat of the rebels, with a loss of six of their number. The Unionists had one man killed, Lieutenant Wheelan, of the New York Mounted Rifles.--(Doc. 15.) A skirmish took place at Morgantown, Kentucky, between a detachment of Union troops, and a force of Morgan's rebel guerrillas, resulting in a retreat of the latter, with a loss of sixteen of their number left in the hands of the Unionists. The United States gunboat Clifton captured in Matagorda Bay, Texas, a yacht.--The British steamer Scotia, while attempting to break the blockade of Charleston, South Carolina, was captured by the United States bark Restless, under the command of Lieutenant Commanding Edward Conroy.--(Doc. 14.)
e United States bark Restless and steamer Flag.--(Doc. 14.) A fight took place near Fayetteville, Arkansas, between a force of Union troops, under the command of General Herron, and a large body of rebel guerrillas, resulting, after an hour's duration, in the utter rout of the rebels, leaving eight dead on the field, some wounded, all their baggage and many of their wagons. The United States gunboat Clifton captured a rebel schooner with eighteen bales of cotton on board, in Matagorda Bay, Texas. The cotton was transferred to the gunboat, and the schooner burned.--A fight took place at Putnam's Ferry, Mo., between a force of Union troops under the command of Colonel Lewis, Twenty-third Iowa, and a body of rebels numbering about one thousand five hundred, in which the latter were defeated with a loss of several killed and over forty taken prisoners. A skirmish took place near Labadieville, La., between a force of Union troops under the command of General Weitzel, and a b
f the Provost-Marshal. No person will be arrested as a slave by any policeman or other person, and put in confinement for safe keeping, unless the person arresting knows that such person is owned by a loyal citizen of the United States. The Inspector and Superintendent of Prisons is authorized to discharge from confinement all slaves not known to be the slaves of loyal owners. Yesterday and to-day, the U. S. gunboats Clifton and Westfield bombarded the town of Lavacca, on Matagorda Bay, Texas. The rebels opened fire on the gunboats from two batteries, but without doing them any injury. After firing more than one hundred and thirty rounds, the gunboats found their ammunition was nearly exhausted, and they were thus compelled to raise the siege without effecting a capture of the town. During the bombardment, a one hundred pound rifled gun on board the Westfield, burst, wounding three men and Acting Master Warren. Governor Brown, of Georgia, issued an address to the p
November 30. Fort Esperanza, in Matagorda Bay, having been blown up and abandoned by the rebels, was occupied by the National forces under the command of Major-General C. C. Washburne.--(Doc. 17.)--the rebel blockade-runner Chatham, was captured in Doboy Sound, Ga., by the gunboat Huron.
December 30. A skirmish took place in the outskirts of St. Augustine, Fla., between a detachment of the Tenth Connecticut regiment, detailed to guard a party of wood-choppers, and a squadron of rebel cavalry, who attempted to seize the teams. The rebels were unsuccessful, but in the fight three privates of the Tenth were killed, and Lieutenant Brown, the officer commanding the detachment, was so badly wounded, that he afterward died. Yesterday an affair occurred, at Matagorda Bay, Texas, between the Union gunboats, a company of the Thirteenth Maine regiment, and a large force of rebel cavalry and a rebel gunboat. The small party of Union troops, under General Herron, had landed with the object of cutting off the rebel pickets, but were attacked by the cavalry, who were driven off by the gunboats. The cavalry, aided by the rebel gunboat, subsequently attacked the Nationals, and caused them to vacate their position; but, this morning, a strong gale of wind drove the steame
ramlette, by Colonel G. W. Gallup, commanding the district of Eastern Kentucky, with fifteen men of company I, Fourteenth Kentucky, and four of his own company, surprised Captain Bradshaw, with eighty men of Hodge's brigade, on Quicksand Creek. He drove them in all directions, they leaving all their horses, arms, and camp equipage in Patrick's possession, who selected thirty of the best horses, and, with three prisoners, made quick time for camp, where he arrived, having left ten dead rebels, and seven mortally wounded on the ground. The captured arms were destroyed by burning them. This is the same Patrick who stole Humphrey Marshall's artillery out of his camp at Shelbyville, last spring. An election was held in Maryland, to determine whether a convention should be called for the purpose of amending the Constitution of the State. The question was carried by a large majority.--the schooner Julia A. Hodges was captured off Matagorda Bay, Texas, by the National vessel Estrella.