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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ounty, and three companies from Louisville under Capts. John D. Pope, J. B. Harvey and M. Lapielle, left Louisville for Nashville. They numbered about three hundred men. At Nashville they were joined by two companies from southwest Kentucky under CNashville they were joined by two companies from southwest Kentucky under Captains Edward Crossland and Brownson, and proceeded to Harper's Ferry. The companies of Captain Pope, who was a veteran of the Mexican war, and Captain Desha, were formed into a battalion of rifle-sharpshooters under Captain Pope, who was made maHis efforts were futile and events rapidly culminated. On the 15th of September, General Johnston, having arrived in Nashville, which he had selected as his headquarters, assumed command of his department. On the same day he notified the Preside (Rebellion Records, Vol. IV, page 349.) On the 28th of October, 1861, General Johnston moved his headquarters from Nashville to Bowling Green, and assumed immediate command of what was styled the army corps of Central Kentucky. The organizatio
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
the early winter rains; and General Johnston, who early foresaw the danger of having his line penetrated by a movement in force up those rivers, thus threatening Nashville and passing between him and General Polk, took every precaution to guard against such result. The best engineers had been sent to the narrow strip which separatk left behind. At the same time recognizing the danger to which he would be exposed at Bowling Green by the depletion of his force and the necessity of covering Nashville, he began the evacuation of the former place on the evening of the 11th, General Buell reaching Bowling Green on the evening of the 12th and General Johns-ton's force and the necessity of covering Nashville, he began the evacuation of the former place on the evening of the 11th, General Buell reaching Bowling Green on the evening of the 12th and General Johns-ton's army being in front of Nashville on the 15th, the withdrawal being made without loss of any material and in perfect order.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
er exposure and suffering of Confederate troops gallant fighting of Colonel Harrison and Second Kentucky, and Colonel Lyon and Eighth Kentucky council of war Generals Floyd and Pillow turn the command over to General Buckner and escape to Nashville General Buckner Surrenders to General Grant. The fall of Fort Donelson which occurred on February 16, 1862, was a far-reaching disaster, which opened up to the occupation by the enemy not only all of Kentucky, but all of Tennessee west of twings to the river. A council being held on the night of the 14th, it was decided that the only alternative was to drive back the enemy's right wing by an early attack in the morning, and having cleared the way, to retreat in the direction of Nashville by the way of Charlotte. Accordingly, on the morning of Saturday, the 15th, at five o'clock, the attack was made on General Grant's right, and the enemy being pressed back after a time in disorder, General Buckner also advanced and the movemen
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
render of Fort Donelson evacuation of Bowling Green and Nashville unjust Outburst of indignation against General Johnston t on the 16th came the announcement of the surrender. In Nashville the excitement and tumult were intense, and all over the the Confederate Congress and by the turbulent populace in Nashville. He moved his forces to the south of Nashville, organizNashville, organized the refugees and stragglers from Fort Donelson and began the evacuation of the capital of Tennessee by removing the army sttle to the Federal forces. By the 22d the evacuation of Nashville was complete, and on the 23d the advance guard of the Federal army from Bowling Green appeared at Edgefield on the north side of the Cumberland. A deputation of the citizens, with tre unattached. On the 28th of February, no movement from Nashville having been meanwhile made against General Johnston, he parch General Buell, with his army of 37,000, marched from Nashville for the same point by way of Columbia and Waynesboro, whi
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
, except Forts Henry and Donelson, and such portions of north Alabama and Georgia as were or might be occupied by the Federal troops. About the same time General Buell was directed to move eastward and take possession of East Tennessee. General Halleck preferred that he should go by way of Chattanooga, but left it entirely to General Buell's judgment to select his route, and as will be seen later, he gave preference to the more northern route by way of McMinnville, about half way between Nashville and Chattanooga. As part of this plan Gen. George W. Morgan had already been sent with his division to Cumberland Gap, to co-operate by a movement upon Knoxville from that point. As the operations of the armies of Generals Grant and Pope will not come under further observation in these pages, it is not necessary to enter into details as to their organization. The former was assigned to Memphis and to the relief of General Curtis in Arkansas, and the latter to Corinth, apparently to watc
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
nformation. When the army fell back through Nashville, he covered its rear and picketed close to tugh by-roads to within eight or ten miles of Nashville, and next morning, in the immediate vicinityshville railroad, twenty-six miles north of Nashville, at 4 o'clock p. m. the next day. Here he seoling many prisoners. He then passed around Nashville and reached Lebanon, about thirty miles eastas overtaken by General Dumont, who had left Nashville with the First Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Wolhad already ordered five companies sent from Nashville to Bowling Green and five to Munfordville. k two weeks; the force of Forrest threatened Nashville itself and the whole line of railroad througs appearance at Gallatin, 26 miles north of Nashville, which had been the scene of his raid in Marthen destroyed a bridge between Gallatin and Nashville, and forty cars, and withdrew to Hartsville,l communication cut off betwixt Gallatin and Nashville, a body of 300 infantry totally cut up or ta[1 more...]
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
d in the preceding chapter, General Bragg adhered to his purpose of moving northward against General Buell and reaching Nashville by that route. See letter of Gov. Isham G. Harris, Vol. XVI-I, page 710, dated July 28th, in which he says General Bragg expected to go direct from Tupelo to Nashville. Meantime Gen. Kirby Smith organized the cavalry commands of General Morgan and Forrest, and sent them on their raids of his own motion, as well as to retard the progress of Buell until Bragg Upon this hypothesis Bragg proposed to march north from Chattanooga and move into Middle Tennessee in the direction of Nashville, via Altamont and McMinnville, and to get into what would be Buell's rear if he was in fact concentrating for a move one he can commence crossing the river, and information he hopes to receive would determine which route he would take, to Nashville or Lexington. Van Dorn and Price, he says, will advance simultaneously with him from Mississippi on West Tennessee, an
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
alley by way of McMinnville, General Bragg had considered as one of the alternatives of his campaign the feasibility of advancing by the same route directly upon Nashville, or the necessity of engaging Buell in the event he should threaten him on his left flank. But finding that he was not in force nearer than McMinnville, he covnorthwest of Pikeville. Effecting this movement before his purpose was discovered, he thus flanked McMinnville and was in position to threaten Buell's flank at Nashville or his communication northward. At one time he contemplated the feasibility of marching directly northward for Lexington and Cincinnati to effect a junction with water. To these objections was added the urgent desire of the Tennesseeans, whose governor and leading men accompanied him, that he would secure possession of Nashville by a direct advance upon that place or by maneuvering Buell out of it. Adopting the latter plan he moved from Sparta on the 7th, by the very route indicated in h
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
of General Smith's column at Big Hill Buell Draws off from pursuit and Prepares to return to Nashville Confederate forces Reunite at London and pass safely through Cumberland Gap Breckinridge witally retired with a large increase of his force from recruits, in the direction of Lebanon and Nashville. The retreat of General Bragg was conducted without further incident, the roads and weatherl Buell, unable to cut off Bragg's retreat, issued orders looking to the return of his army to Nashville. General Halleck, upon receipt of the announcement of the battle of Perryville and Bragg's reof the barren country, the approach of winter and bad roads; besides that, a prompt return to Nashville was necessary in order to hold any part of Tennessee. On the 9th Halleck telegraphed: I am dithere while the roads are passable. Buell, however, continued the movement of his army toward Nashville, and on the 23d General Rosecrans, at Corinth, Miss., was directed to repair to Cincinnati to
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
g transferred to the Trans-Mississippi. The army spent the month of December, 1862, before Murfreesboro, drilling and perfecting itself in organization in contemplation of an early attack by Rosecrans, who was collecting a formidable army at Nashville. General Wheeler's cavalry was in front, while Forrest covered the left flank in front of Columbia, where Van Dorn was in command of a force chiefly of cavalry. In the early part of the month one of the most brilliant events of the year too's corps will move on the Shelbyville, and Hardee's on Manchester pike, trains in front, cavalry in rear. (Signed) Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Sunday morning, Official, Geo. G. Garner, A. A. G. General Rosecrans had moved out from Nashville on the 26th, but it was not until the afternoon of the 29th that Wheeler withdrew from his front and he arrived opposite our left wing. It was hoped and expected that he would attack, but he merely showed a disposition to extend his right beyo
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