hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 46 results in 19 document sections:

1 2
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, at Rome, as soon as relieved by troops from General McPherson's army, to march direct on Dallas, by way of Van Wert. The advance guard of Mc-Cook's division of cavalry reached Stilesborough on the afternoon of the 23d, and found the place occupied by a strong force of the enemy's cavalry, supported by infantry, which resisted his farther advance, skirmishing with him until dark. The commands of Major-Generals Hooker, Howard, and Palmer camped on the south side of Euharlee Creek, in accordance with my directions. General Hooker was directed to send one division of his command at daylight on the morning of the 24th to push the enemy across Raccoon Creek toward Allatoona, on the Alabama road, and hold him in that position until relieved by the Army of the Ohio, covering the movements of the balance of the Twentieth Corps, directly through Stilesborough, upon Burnt Hickory, at which latter place his whole command was to encamp. McCook's division of cavalry was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
1, and 22, the army rested in position near Cassville, renewed its supplies, sent back everything surplus, and made other preparations for a movement on Dallas. May 23, crossed the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge and went into position at Euharlee Creek. May 24, crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill and marched to Burnt Hickory, where we encamped for the night. May 25, command marched by a settlement road, making a detour to the right of Burnt Hickory, and expecting to come into DEuharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill and marched to Burnt Hickory, where we encamped for the night. May 25, command marched by a settlement road, making a detour to the right of Burnt Hickory, and expecting to come into Dallas by a Van Wert and Dallas road. This route was taken to avoid collision with the numerous wagons of the corps in front of us that were obliged to move on one road. About 2 p. m. Lieutenant-Colonel Mendenhall, department inspector-general, met me at a point six or seven miles from Dallas, bringing an order from General Thomas for me to move by the first left-hand road across to the direct Burnt Hickory and Dallas road, as the enemy had been met by General Hooker's advance in considerable f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
or portions of them, opened fire upon the rebels with good effect. Our line of battle being formed and the skirmishers pressing them, the enemy withdrew his forces and retired behind his works at Cassville. During the night they evacuated this position. The 20th, 21st, and 22d we remained in position near Cassville, and on the 22d sent back to Bridgeport, Ala., all the surplus baggage of the brigade. On the 23d we crossed the Etowah and camped near Euharlee. On the 24th we passed Euharlee Creek and went into camp late at night in heavy rain at Burnt Hickory. On the 25th we continued in pursuit of the enemy, and passing Pumpkin Vine Creek were ordered to support General Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went into line of battle at night and lay in this position. May 26, remained in this p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
ked for the night. On the morning of the 20th no enemy was found in front of our army, and my command remained here till noon of the 23d, when I was directed by General Newton to march my brigade in the direction of the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge, which was reached before sundown, but the road being filled with troops and transportation from other divisions my brigade was delayed crossing till long after dark. After crossing the river we marched some four miles in the direction of Euharlee Creek, and bivouacked for the night. On the 24th we again moved forward, crossed the Euharlee at [Barrett's] Mills, and, crossing Raccoon Greek by [Dallas] road, went into camp for the night near Burnt Hickory. This evening a heavy rain fell. On the 25th we moved forward, following General Kimball, commanding First Brigade, who was in advance of the division. Nothing of moment occurred until we crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, on the road leading to New Hope Church, where we found that the Twen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
ee miles southeast of Kingston, where we were allowed to remain, the men resting, washing clothes, &c., during the 21st and 22d ultimo. As every available team was ordered into the supply train, baggage was sent to the rear and the regiment was restricted to one team during the remainder of the campaign. May 23, marched at 12 m., leaving the enemy to our left, crossed the Etowah River shortly after dusk, and bivouacked two miles farther on at 8 p. m. May 24, moved at 8 a. m., crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill, passed through Stilesborough, and bivouacked at dusk, after a march of thirteen miles under a scorching sun. May 25, moved to within one and a half miles of Dallas, and bivouacked in such position as to support the Twentieth Army Corps, which had engaged the enemy in strong force, and suffered a repulse during the afternoon. May 26, Companies B, F, G, H, and K were placed on picket, and the remainder of the regiment stood to arms during the day and threw up breastwork
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
rest and receiving necessary supplies, until the afternoon of the 23d, when, with twenty days rations in the supply train, it moved with the division and the entire army to the right, with a view to turning the enemy's position in the Allatoona Mountain, where he was strongly fortified. Moving nearly due west about seven miles, and crossing the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge, thence moving on blind roads and over a broken country in a southerly direction toward. Dallas, Ga., crossing Euharlee Creek on the 23d and Pumpkin Vine Creek on the 25th, where heavy firing at the front was heard, caused by the enemy having hastily abandoned his position at Allatoona Pass and by a hurried march thrown himself near Dallas upon the advance of General Hooker's corps (the Twentieth), which was the leading column on this road, our troops were pressed forward as rapidly as possible, the road being partially obstructed by the troops of the Twentieth Corps, until 9 p. m., when this brigade bivouacked
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
rmed line of battle and advanced upon them. Our position was on the left of the brigade in the first line, the brigade being in reserve to the Second and Third Brigades of the division, did not become closely engaged. During the night the enemy again left our front. Casualties this day, 1 enlisted man wounded. Our position remained unchanged at Cassville until the 23d, when we took up our line of march with the brigade. Marched ten miles south, crossing Etowah River, and encamped on Euharlee Creek at Milner's Mills. On 24th resumed marching; halted for the night after traveling twelve miles. On 25th continued our march, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek, moving to the support of the Twentieth Corps, which was severely engaged with the enemy near Dallas. On the morning of the 26th the brigade went into position on the left of the troops of the Twentieth Corps, already in line. The day was consumed in maneuvering for positions and fortifying them; we were not at any time during the day
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my right on the Cedartown road. On the 24th, at 10 a. m., I moved by my right, crossing Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however,Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however, it was found necessary to repair before I could pass my artillery over it. Within two miles of this my march was delayed until late in the afternoon by General Stanley's column, which I found passing into the same road from the left, in front of me. I did not make more than two miles beyond this, the road being very difficult and blocked with the wagons, ambulances, and artillery of the troops which had preceded me. At 8 p. m., in the midst of a driving rainstorm, which lasted until 11 p. m.,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
a half miles from Kingston. May 19.-The command marched through Kingston to a bridge on the Etowah River, four miles southwest of the town. May 20.-The brigade moved at 8 a. m. to a point on the Western and Atlantic Railroad near Cassville, where it went into camp about noon. At this place the command stopped three days for the purpose of drawing shoes and clothing. May 23.-The command marched at 8 a. m., crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford, and encamped for the night on Euharlee Creek near the Burnt Hickory road. May 24.-The brigade moved out on the Burnt Hickory road; crossing Raccoon Creek, it bivouacked for the night on the south side. May 25.-The brigade remained at this place during the day, while the train of the Twentieth Army Corps passed, and at 1 o'clock next morning, May 26, it marched on the Burnt Hickory road, through Burnt Hickory, to Brown's Mill, three miles from Dallas. May 27.-The command moved in two lines, supporting the Second and Thir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
back and the regiment had no transportation left. Marched at 8 o'clock on the morning of the 23d about four miles down the Etowah River, where they waded the stream, and then marched in a southern direction about five miles and encamped near Euharlee Creek. On the 24th they marched about three miles and encamped on the south side of Euharlee Creek, where they remained until 1 o'clock on the morning of the 26th, when they marched across Pumpkin Vine Creek, and went into position in the rear of Euharlee Creek, where they remained until 1 o'clock on the morning of the 26th, when they marched across Pumpkin Vine Creek, and went into position in the rear of the Twenty-third Corps. On the 27th they moved to the left of the line until they reached Brown's Mill creek, where they remained until after dark, then crossed the creek and occupied a ridge on the west side. On the 28th they moved to the front before daylight, and occupied the side of a wooded hill. Before the line was well formed the enemy made a demonstration with cavalry and infantry, but were easily driven back ; no casualties. We immediately threw up strong works. The skirmish line d
1 2