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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 54. the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
al Terry's report. headquarters United States forces on Federal Point, N. C., January 25, 1865. General: I have the honor to submit thct that we would be able to make a landing on the open beach of Federal Point until Wednesday, the 11th. On that day Admiral Porter proposedorders were sent to them to follow us. We did not arrive off Federal Point until nearly night-fall; consequently, and in accordance with tr and the Atlantic ocean, about a mile and a half north-east of Federal Point. For five miles north of Federal Point this peninsula is sandFederal Point this peninsula is sandy and low, not rising more than fifteen feet above high tide, the interior abounding in fresh-water swamps, often wooded and almost impassablval vessels from running through New Inlet or landing troops on Federal Point. 1. Land-Front.--This front consists of a half bastion on thneral Whiting and Colonel Lamb surrendered with the garrison at Fort Buchanan. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. Ames, B
t Fisher consisted of two fronts — the first, or land front, running across the peninsula, at this point seven hundred yards wide, was four hundred and eighty yards in length, while the second, or sea front, ran from the right of the first parallel to the beach, to the Mound Battery--a distance of thirteen hundred yards. The land front was intended to resist any attack from the north; the sea front to prevent any of the enemy's vessels from running through New Inlet, or landing troops on Federal Point. It was evidently the important concern to prevent a landing of the enemy's troops, or to dislodge them as soon as they got ashore; and Bragg's forces were disposed with that view, Gen. Hoke holding a line north of Fort Fisher. On the 13th January, Terry succeeded, under a heavy fire from the fleet, in landing several thousand troops on the seabeach, some five or six miles above Fort Fisher. The place of landing was admirably selected; the troops being disembarked just above the nec
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
-ship was taken inside the entrance, and anchored under Fort Caswell, where she was burnt in December, 1861, by two boat's crews from the Mount Vernon. At New Inlet, a light was placed on the Mound, a small battery that flanked the works on Federal Point. In the earlier blockade, the lights of the squadron served as a guide to blockade-runners. After the general practice was discontinued, the plan was adopted of carrying a light on the senior officer's vessel, which was anchored in the centurther use. Three weeks later, however, she was floated off by the Confederates, and anchored under the batteries; a position from which she was cut out with some difficulty. The Hebe, a Bermuda steamer, was run ashore a fortnight later on Federal Point, under circumstances generally similar, except that it was blowing a gale from the northeast. A boat sent in from the Niphon was swamped, but the crew succeeded in getting on board the Hebe. A second boat was driven ashore, and the crew wer
weather. Under all these circumstances, I invite you to such a military co-operation as will ensure the fall of Fort Fisher, the importance of which has already received your careful consideration. He added that the telegram was sent at the suggestion of the President. On the 31st of December the Secretary of the Navy wrote Admiral Porter as follows: Lieutenant-General Grant will send immediately a competent force, properly commanded, to co-operate in the capture of the defences on Federal Point. On January 14, 1865, Admiral Porter reports that he had been busily employed since his withdrawal from Fort Fisher in filling the ships with ammunition and coal. The large vessels had no harbor, and these operations outside were attended by extreme difficulties. It was a season of gales upon which the enemy relied to break up operations against him. We will see; we have gone through the worst of it, have held on through gales heavy enough to drive anything to sea, and we have sust
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Maps, sketches, etc., Pertaining to the several volumes. (search)
bt Anderson, Va. 125 Redoubt Dutton, Va. 125 Redoubt Wead, Va. 125 Richmond, Va. 77, 89, 135 Volume XLI. Army of Missouri 47 Big Blue, Mo. 66 Campaign against Sterling Price 66 Charlot, Mo. 66 Newtonia, Mo. 66 Osage or Mine Crash, Kans. 66 Texas Coast 65 Westport, Mo. 66 Volume XLII. Bermuda Hundred, Va. 77 Broadway, Va. 124 Cobb's Hill, Va. 68 Deep Bottom, Va. 67 Dutch Gap Canal, Va. 65, 124 Federal Point, N. C. 67 Five Forks, Va. 77 Fort Brady to Fort Burnham, Va. 68 Fort Fisher, N. C. 67 Harrison's Landing, Va. 67 Petersburg, Va. 67, 77, 93 Redoubt McConihe, Va. 125 Richmond, Va. 77, 135 Weldon Railroad, Va. 67 Wilmington, N. C. 76 Volume XLIII. Army of the Shenandoah 69 Army of the Valley 83-85 Belle Grove, Va. 82 Berryville, Va. 82, 84 Bridgewater, Va. 82 Brock's Gap, Va. 84 Brown's Gap, Va. 85 Cedar Creek, Va.
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
r, N. C.: Obstructions, Feb. 7, 1865 68, 7 Brush Mountain, Ga. 43, 4; 49, 4; 59, 3; 60, 1; 88, 2 Buchanan, Va. 81, 6; 135-C, 1; 137, F1 Fort Buchanan, N. C.: Sketch 75, 1 Buckatunna, Miss. 135-A Buck Creek, Ga. 71, 5, 71, 8; 118, 1; 143, H9; 144, D9, 144, F1, 144, F3 Buckhannon, W. Va. C7; 171 Fayetteville, Va. 8, 1; 22, 5, 22, 7;23, 5;91, 1; 100, 1; 137, B6 Fayetteville, W. Va. 9, 3;135-A Fearnsville, Va. 137, H9 Federal Point, N. C. 67, 1; 75, 3;76, 4; 105, 8;135-A; 139, C10 Fernandina, Fla. 135-A; 145, E11; 171 Fort Fillmore, N. Mex. 54, 1; 171 Fort Fisher, N. C. 5-86, 10, 86, 16; 105, 5, 105, 8; 118, 1; 120, 2; 133, 1, 133, 2 Cape Fear River 76, 2; 132, 1-132, 4; 139 Cape Fear and Brunswick Rivers 68, 7 Fort Buchanan, 1865 75, 1 Fort Fisher: Dec. 7-27, 1864 67, 1, 67, 5 Jan. 3-17, 1865 75, 1-75, 3; 129, 9 Goldsborough, Dec. 11-20, 1862 91, 3 Mar
than a mile across, the extremity of which is known as Federal Point. At the mouth of the Cape Fear and directly south of FFederal Point lies Smith's island, on either side of which are the two principal entrances to the river. The southern or outet, was commanded by Fort Fisher, which stretched across Federal Point from the river to the sea. Butler, it will be rememberent was an absolute failure. For five miles north of Federal Point the peninsula is sandy and low, not rising more than fice from running through New Inlet, or landing troops on Federal Point. The land front consisted of a curtain with bastions amanded, to co-operate in the capture of the defences on Federal Point. . . . The Department is perfectly satisfied with your not until the 12th, that the combined force arrived off Federal Point; even then, in accordance with the decision of the admidvance and enfiladed the level strip of land leading to Federal Point, to prevent reinforcements being put ashore from the ri
ry General William III., in command of Nineteenth corps at Cedar creek, III., 93 . Ewell, General R. S., at battle of the Wilderness, II., 95; holds south bank of Cumberland river, III., 242; at fall of Richmond, 538; sets fire to Richmond, 538; withdraws his command, 540 , captured at battle of Sailor's creek, 577. Farragut, Admiral, expedition of, against Vicksburg, i., 125; runs by Port Hudson and communicates with Grant, 179; passes forts at entrance of Mobile bay, III., 41. Federal Point, Cape Fear river, situation of, III., 307; geography of, 311. Ferrero, General E., at Spottsylvania, II. 207. Fisher, Fort, on Cape Fear river, expedition against, III., 224; position of, 226; Grant's instructions for operations against, 235; first operations against, 307-322; second operations against 325-348. Fisher's Hill, battle of, III., 31-35. Fitch, Captain, at Cumberland river, III., 239. Five Forks, importance of, III., 457, 459; rebel activity at, 459, 467; batt
than a mile across, the extremity of which is known as Federal Point. At the mouth of the Cape Fear and directly south of FFederal Point lies Smith's island, on either side of which are the two principal entrances to the river. The southern or outet, was commanded by Fort Fisher, which stretched across Federal Point from the river to the sea. Butler, it will be rememberent was an absolute failure. For five miles north of Federal Point the peninsula is sandy and low, not rising more than fice from running through New Inlet, or landing troops on Federal Point. The land front consisted of a curtain with bastions amanded, to co-operate in the capture of the defences on Federal Point. . . . The Department is perfectly satisfied with your not until the 12th, that the combined force arrived off Federal Point; even then, in accordance with the decision of the admidvance and enfiladed the level strip of land leading to Federal Point, to prevent reinforcements being put ashore from the ri
ry General William III., in command of Nineteenth corps at Cedar creek, III., 93 . Ewell, General R. S., at battle of the Wilderness, II., 95; holds south bank of Cumberland river, III., 242; at fall of Richmond, 538; sets fire to Richmond, 538; withdraws his command, 540 , captured at battle of Sailor's creek, 577. Farragut, Admiral, expedition of, against Vicksburg, i., 125; runs by Port Hudson and communicates with Grant, 179; passes forts at entrance of Mobile bay, III., 41. Federal Point, Cape Fear river, situation of, III., 307; geography of, 311. Ferrero, General E., at Spottsylvania, II. 207. Fisher, Fort, on Cape Fear river, expedition against, III., 224; position of, 226; Grant's instructions for operations against, 235; first operations against, 307-322; second operations against 325-348. Fisher's Hill, battle of, III., 31-35. Fitch, Captain, at Cumberland river, III., 239. Five Forks, importance of, III., 457, 459; rebel activity at, 459, 467; batt
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