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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 34 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Libellus de politica conservatia Maris. Or, The Pollicy of keeping the Sea. (search)
d pull. Under the board they pissen as they sit: This commeth of covenant of a worthie wit. Without Caleis in their Butter they cakked When they fled home, and when they leysure lacked To holde their siege, they went like as a Doe: Well was that Fleming that might trusse, and goe. For feare they turned backe and hyed fast, My Lord of Glocester made hem so agast With his comming, and sought hem in her land, And brent and slowe as he had take on hand: So that our enemies durst not bide, nor stereo in likewise I would were on the see By the Noble, that swerde should have power, And the ships on the sea about us here. What needeth a garland which is made of Ivie Shewe a taverne winelesse, also thrive I? If men were wise, the Frenchmen and Fleming Shuld bere no state in sea by werring. Then Hankin lyons shuld not be so bold To stoppe wine, and shippes for to hold Unto our shame. He had be beten thence. Alas, alas, why did we this offence, Fully to shend the old English fames; And the prof
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the commodities of Pruce, and High Dutch men, and Easterlings. The fifth Chapitle. (search)
in the substance of the Beere, That they drinken feele too good chepe, not dere. Yee have heard that two Flemings togider Will undertake or they goe any whither, Or they rise once to drinke a Ferkin full, Of good Beerekin: so sore they hall and pull. Under the board they pissen as they sit: This commeth of covenant of a worthie wit. Without Caleis in their Butter they cakked When they fled home, and when they leysure lacked To holde their siege, they went like as a Doe: Well was that Fleming that might trusse, and goe. For feare they turned backe and hyed fast, My Lord of Glocester made hem so agast With his comming, and sought hem in her land, And brent and slowe as he had take on hand: So that our enemies durst not bide, nor stere, They fled to mewe, they durst no more appeare, Rebuked sore for ever so shamefully, Unto her utter everlasting villanie. Nowe Beere and Bakon bene fro Pruse ybrought Into Flanders, as loved and farre ysought; Osmond, Copper, Bow-staves, Steele, an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the commodities of Brabant and Zeland and Henauld and marchandy carried by land to the martes. Cap. 8. (search)
f this land On the one side hath, as I understand, A prince riding with his swerd ydraw, In the other side sitting, soth it is in saw, Betokening good rule and punishing In very deede of England by the king. And it is so, God blessed mought he bee. So in likewise I would were on the see By the Noble, that swerde should have power, And the ships on the sea about us here. What needeth a garland which is made of Ivie Shewe a taverne winelesse, also thrive I? If men were wise, the Frenchmen and Fleming Shuld bere no state in sea by werring. Then Hankin lyons shuld not be so bold To stoppe wine, and shippes for to hold Unto our shame. He had be beten thence. Alas, alas, why did we this offence, Fully to shend the old English fames; And the profits of England, and their names: Why is this power called of covetise; With false colours cast beforn our eyes? That if good men called werriours Would take in hand for the commons succours, To purge the sea unto our great avayle, And winne hem goods
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A conclusion of this depending of keeping of the sea. (search)
f this land On the one side hath, as I understand, A prince riding with his swerd ydraw, In the other side sitting, soth it is in saw, Betokening good rule and punishing In very deede of England by the king. And it is so, God blessed mought he bee. So in likewise I would were on the see By the Noble, that swerde should have power, And the ships on the sea about us here. What needeth a garland which is made of Ivie Shewe a taverne winelesse, also thrive I? If men were wise, the Frenchmen and Fleming Shuld bere no state in sea by werring. Then Hankin lyons shuld not be so bold To stoppe wine, and shippes for to hold Unto our shame. He had be beten thence. Alas, alas, why did we this offence, Fully to shend the old English fames; And the profits of England, and their names: Why is this power called of covetise; With false colours cast beforn our eyes? That if good men called werriours Would take in hand for the commons succours, To purge the sea unto our great avayle, And winne hem goods
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
gh admiral of England had received letters from the court, signifying unto him that her Majestie was advertised that the Spanish Fleete would not come foorth, nor was to be any longer expected for, and therefore, that upon her Majesties commandement he must send backe foure of her tallest and strongest ships unto Chattam. The lord high Admiral of England being thus on the sudden, namely upon the 19. of July about foure of the clocke in the afternoone, enformed by the pinasse of captaine Fleming aforesaid, of the Spaniards approch, with all speed and diligence possible he warped his ships, and caused his mariners and souldiers (the greater part of whom was absent for the cause aforesayd) to come on boord, and that with great trouble and difficultie, insomuch that the lord Admiral himselfe was faine to lie without in the road with sixe ships onely all that night, after the which many others came foorth of the haven. The very next day being the 20. of July about high noone, was the S
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The valiant fight performed by 10. Merchants ships of London, against 12. Spanish gallies in the Straights of Gibraltar, the 24. of April 1590. (search)
with great valiancie the one against the other, and so continued for the space of sixe houres. About the beginning of this our fight there came two Flemings to our Fleet, who seeing the force of the Gallies to be so great, the one of them presently yeelded, strooke his sailes, and was taken by the Gallies, whereas if they would have offered themselves to have fought in our behalfe and their owne defence, they needed not to have bene taken so cowardly as they were to their cost. The other Fleming being also ready to performe the like piece of service began to vaile his sailes, and intended to have yeelded immediatly. But the Trumpetter in that shippe plucked foorth his faulchion and stepped to the Pilote at the helme, and vowed that if he did not speedily put off to the English Fleete, and so take part with them, he would presently kill him: which the Pilote for feare of death did, and so by that meanes they were defended from present death, and from the tyrannie of those Spaniards,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
goe to. Howbeit they had intelligence from the king of all our voyage the eight of August, which was three weekes before we set foorth of England : as also by a Fleming that had seene all our provision at London . The 28 being Sunday at ten of the clocke at night wee set saile, and stood away Southwest and Southsouthwest sn of victuals for their reliefe. The Captaine of this Flybote tooke upon him to be a perfect Pilot of S. Tome, and willingly consented to stay with us, being a Fleming . Having watered at the Canaries, by the counsell of this Fleming we shaped our course for the Iles of Cape Verde, he assuring us that we should there meet the fFleming we shaped our course for the Iles of Cape Verde, he assuring us that we should there meet the fleete of Saint Tome, for the yeere was so farre past, that we knewe they were all departed from S. Tome. The first of July we fell with the Isle Maio, where wee saw small hope of any fleete to bee expected, & therefore departed for Cape Verde, the appointed place for the George noble to meete us: where we arrived the fift of Ju
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage truely discoursed, made by sir Francis Drake, and sir John Hawkins, chiefly pretended for some speciall service on the Islands and maine of the West Indies, with sixe of the Queenes ships, and 21 other shippes and barkes, containing 2500 men and boyes, in the yeere 1595. In which voyage both the foresayd knights died by sicknesse. (search)
pon by the herdmen, who with their dogs and staves killed the captaine and three or foure of his company: the rest were sore wounded: the Salomons Chirurgian taken prisoner, who disclosed our pretended voyage as much as in him lay: so as the Viceroy sent a caravel of adviso into the Indies, unto all such places as wee did pretend to goe to. Howbeit they had intelligence from the king of all our voyage the eight of August, which was three weekes before we set foorth of England : as also by a Fleming that had seene all our provision at London . The 28 being Sunday at ten of the clocke at night wee set saile, and stood away Southwest and Southsouthwest some 200 leagues, untill we came in the height of the Islands of Cape Verde, and then more Westerly for Martinino, one of the Islands of the West Indies, which we saw the 27 of October: but the night before we had a storme, in which sir Francis with foure or five other ships bearing on head of the fleete was separated. Then we stood
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true relation of the voyage undertaken by Sir Anthony Sherley Knight in Anno 1596. intended for the Ile of San Tome, but performed to S. Iago, Dominica , Margarita, along the coast of Tierra firma, to the Ile of Jamaica, the bay of the Honduras , 30 leagues up Rio Dolce, and homewarde by Newfoundland . With the memorable exploytes atchieved in all this voyage. (search)
wo hundred tunnes bound for Brasill, having nothing aboord her but some small portion of victuals for their reliefe. The Captaine of this Flybote tooke upon him to be a perfect Pilot of S. Tome, and willingly consented to stay with us, being a Fleming . Having watered at the Canaries, by the counsell of this Fleming we shaped our course for the Iles of Cape Verde, he assuring us that we should there meet the fleete of Saint Tome, for the yeere was so farre past, that we knewe they were all deFleming we shaped our course for the Iles of Cape Verde, he assuring us that we should there meet the fleete of Saint Tome, for the yeere was so farre past, that we knewe they were all departed from S. Tome. The first of July we fell with the Isle Maio, where wee saw small hope of any fleete to bee expected, & therefore departed for Cape Verde, the appointed place for the George noble to meete us: where we arrived the fift of July, and there found him. And so instantly we proceeded for our voyage, because the yeere was farre spent. At this place most unfortunately our General fell exceeding sicke, and we wanting water were enforced to goe with a place named Pescadores in 10
comming was to understand our intents, and what we sought: who being satisfied, departed with a farewell of three great pieces from ech ship. The 21 day about three a clocke afternoone, came a canoa, with the old Genouois named Joseph Dory, a Fleming named Paul Badeves, and Steven Repose a Portugall, and brought a letter from the governor, and withall, answere of feare and doubts of us, &c. After many speeches and requests, a banket was made them, and the generall in his pinnesse with his mue token and present to the governor, which was by all the assistants determined to send him three yards of fine skarlet, & three yards of fine murry-cloth; and to Joseph Dory the old Genouois, Steven Repose the Portugall, and to Paul Badeves the Fleming , ech of them three yards of fine blacke cloth, which our merchants went up to Santos withall in the admirals skiffe, about nine a clocke aforenoone. Also this forenoone, we being minded to goe up higher with our ships into harbour, I advis
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