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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 338 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 193 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 174 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 64 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) or search for Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
nd, was the capture of New Orleans and the forts Jackson and St. Philip, guarding the approach to tulty. Any three vessels could have passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip a month after the commencem forth all their energies in strengthening Forts Jackson and St. Philip, obstructing the river, andased firing. At 5 o'clock in the evening Fort Jackson was seen to be on fire, and, as the flames k their position below the water-battery of Fort Jackson, at a distance of less than two hundred yarteamers in silencing the water-batteries of Fort Jackson. At this moment the Confederates in Fort Juninjured, the McRae was at anchor close to Fort Jackson, and three other vessels whose character I n I immediately opened a very rapid fire on Fort Jackson with all the mortars, and with such good eftar-steamers attacking the water-battery of Fort Jackson. their posts and went up the bank out of rty-three times in their hulls by shots from Fort Jackson, while they received their great damage fro[28 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. (search)
n Russell Bartlett, U. S. N. Aspect of Fort Jackson in 1885. from the summit of the levee look Porter, in command of the mortar-fleet at forts Jackson and St. Philip. From a photograph. vesseld be with our port battery directed against Fort Jackson on the right bank. My two crews manned the the shot and shell from Forts St. Philip and Jackson passing over us and bursting everywhere in the to the stock at this point by a shot from Fort Jackson.--J. R. B. A few moments later there was a was hulled a number of times; one shot from Fort Jackson struck the rail just at the break of the pohe river, throwing shells and shrapnel into Fort Jackson as fast as the guns could be loaded and firrough my coat-sleeve. Just after passing Fort Jackson we saw a bright glare on the starboard quar starboard, until she was on a line between Fort Jackson and the Hartford. The Flag-ship Hartford. The Brooklyn remained under the fire of Fort Jackson until Craven saw Farragut free from the fir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Farragut's capture of New Orleans. (search)
bardment of forty-eight hours would reduce Forts Jackson and St. Philip to a heap of ruins. Mr. We and added to the confusion and distress in Fort Jackson. But that the passage would have been madees. What was the situation of affairs in Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip about this time — the 2been disabled. The barracks and citadel of Fort Jackson had been destroyed by fire. There was noe of the schooners down to blockade back of Fort Jackson to prevent their escaping by way of Baratarf Colonel Edward Higgins, who had commanded Fort Jackson, by the Confederate Court of Inquiry, and hApril a formal demand for the surrender of Forts Jackson and St. Philip was made by Commander Porteneer Corps, in a report of the condition of Fort Jackson dated in May, 1862, says: Fort St. Philip, after the surrender that of the 75 guns in Fort Jackson 4 guns were dismounted and 11 carriages wering the entire siege. Does this look as if Fort Jackson had been disabled by the mortars before the[5 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
te Army. Major-General Mansfield Lovell. Coast defenses, Brig.-Gen. Johnson K. Duncan. forts Jackson and St. Philip, Lieut.-Col. Edward Higgins. Fort Jackson: La. Scouts and Sharp-shooters, Fort Jackson: La. Scouts and Sharp-shooters, Capt. W. G. Mullen; St. Mary's (La.) Cannoneers, Capt. F. O. Cornay; other company and battery commanders, Capt. James Ryan (detached on the Louisiana), Capt. J. B. Anderson (w), Lieut. William M. Britt. Quarantine: Chalmette (La.) Regt., Col. Ignatius Szymanski. Batteries of the forts. Fort Jackson. Barbette: 2 10-inch Columbiads; 3 8-inch Columbiads; 1 7-inch rifle; 2 8-inch mortars; 6 42-ated by Col. Higgins, in his testimony before the Court of Inquiry, as 1100 men. The loss at Forts Jackson and St. Philip was 11 killed and 39 wounded; and at the upper batteries 1 killed and 1 wounded. At Fort Jackson 121 officers and men were surrendered; number at other points not fully reported. Relative strength of the opposing forces. in a letter to the Editors, Professor J. R. Soley,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Farragut below New Orleans. (search)
icular reference to the forts. No men ever endured greater hardships, privations, and sufferings than the garrison of Fort Jackson during the eight days and nights of the bombardment, when more than fourteen hundred 13-inch shells struck within theia) which could simply float, but nothing more! The Governor Moore, which was anchored near Fort St. Philip opposite Fort Jackson, could not have been surprised at any time. I slept for the most part only during the day, and but rarely at night. tantly fired the after gun, the one forward being fired by the sentry there; at the same moment the water-batteries of Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip let drive, followed in an instant by a general discharge from all the available guns in the forts,the advancing fleet, mounting 192 guns, and Commander Porter's squadron of 7 vessels, mounting 53 guns, which attacked Fort Jackson's flank below the obstructions. There was also a splendid practice from 19 Federal mortars, which fired their 13-inch
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The ram Manassas at the passage of the New Orleans forts. (search)
ship (since known to have been the Pensacola). As the Manassas dashed at her quarter, she shifted her helm, avoided the collision beautifully, and fired her stern pivot-gun close into our faces, cutting away the flag-staff. By that time the Manassas was getting between the forts, and I told Captain Levin, the pilot, that we could do nothing with the vessels which had passed, but we could go down to the mortar-fleet; but no sooner had we got in seeing range than both forts opened on us, Fort Jackson striking the vessel several times on the bend with the lighter guns. I knew the vessel must be sunk if once under the 10-inch guns, so I turned up the river again, and very soon saw a large ship, the Hartford Professor J. Russell Soley, U. S. N., in a communication to the Editors, gives the following discussion of the question, Did the Manassas ram the Hartford at the battle of New Orleans? In the affirmative is the following testimony: (1) Captain Kautz, a lieutenant on board the Har
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Incidents of the occupation of New Orleans. (search)
Incidents of the occupation of New Orleans. Albert Kautz, Captain, U. S. N. The maintop of the Hartford, with howitzer. At 1 o'clock P. M. of the 25th of April, 1862, Farragut's squadron, having completed its memorable passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and having silenced the Chalmette batteries, anchored in front of the city of New Orleans in a drenching rain. Captain Theodorus Bailey, being second in command, claimed the privilege of carrying ashore the demand for the surrender of the city. This was accorded him by the flag-officer, and the captain, accompanied by Lieutenant George H. Perkins (now captain), at once proceeded to the City Hall. Mayor Monroe took the ground that as General Lovell had not yet left the city, the demand should be made on him. At the captain's request the mayor sent for the general, who in a few moments appeared with his staff. General Lovell said he would not surrender the city, adding that he had already withdrawn his soldiers, an
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The water-battery at Fort Jackson. (search)
The water-battery at Fort Jackson. William B. Robertson, Captain, 1st Louisiana Artillery, C. S. . [See map, p. 34.] This was an outwork of Fort Jackson, separated from it by two moats. It was qupril the enemy commenced the bombardment of Fort Jackson and the water-battery with all his mortar-b in every instance by the combined fire of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and the water-battery. On the point of woods, about three miles below Fort Jackson, and behind which the mortar-boats lay concrain shell incessantly, night and day, upon Fort Jackson and the water-battery, until nearly sundownttery thundered its greeting to the enemy. Fort Jackson followed instantly with a grand crash of ard our range. As the vessels were masked by Fort Jackson from our view as they passed up the river, missiles. No guns were silenced in either Fort Jackson or the water-battery at any time during thiaccomplish, and among them the silencing of Fort Jackson and the water-battery. I think it could be[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate responsibilities for Farragut's success. (search)
s Grimshaw Duncan, son of the Commander of Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip. On the 22d of Aprilbeing made to prepare her for the relief of Fort Jackson, the condition of which is fully felt by me I know the importance to the safety of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and the city of New Orleansd for from our fleet, the entire command of Fort Jackson was turned out to repair damages under a veat the mortar practice of the enemy against Fort Jackson must be nearly exhausted, and that there isaction at all hazards, as well as those of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. A proper position for then my opinion, he contemplates for attacking Fort Jackson with his large vessels. As you may not hav and final appeal to Captain Mitchell: Fort Jackson, La., 3:30 A. M., April 24th, 1862. Captaion the St. Philip shore, to operate against Fort Jackson. They are placing themselves boldly, with Lieutenant William M. Bridges, Adjutant of Fort Jackson, now (1887) a resident of Richmond, Va., wa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Richmond scenes in 1862. (search)
leet under Richmond from the Manchester side of the James. Flag-Officer Farragut, he had been sent in charge of ordnance and deserters to a Confederate vessel in the river; that Lieutenant R----, a friend of his, on the way to report at Fort Jackson during the hot shelling, had invited the lad to accompany him by way of a pleasure trip; that while they were crossing the moat around Fort Jackson, in a canoe, and under heavy fire, a thirteen-inch mortar-shell had struck the water near, halfFort Jackson, in a canoe, and under heavy fire, a thirteen-inch mortar-shell had struck the water near, half filling their craft; and that, after watching the fire from this point for an hour, C----had pulled back again alone, against the Mississippi current, under fire for a mile and a half of the way-passing an astonished alligator who had been hit on the head by a piece of shell and was dying under protest. Thus ended a trip alluded to by C----twenty years later as an example of juvenile foolhardiness. Aboard the steamship Star of the West, The same vessel that drew the opening shots of the