Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fort Jefferson (Florida, United States) or search for Fort Jefferson (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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army was 16,000 men, and these were principally in the Western States and Territories, guarding the frontier settlers against the Indians. The forts and arsenals on the seaboard, especially within the slave States, were so weakly manned, or not manned at all, that they became an easy prey to the Confederates. The consequence was that they were seized, and when the new administration came into power, of all the fortifications within the slave States only Fort Monroe, in Virginia, and Forts Jefferson, Taylor, and Pickens, on the Gulf coast, remained in possession of the government. The seized forts were sixteen in number. They had cost the government about $6,000,000, and had an aggregate of 1,226 guns. All the arsenals in the cotton-growing States had been seized. Twiggs had surrendered a portion of the National army in Texas. The army had been put so far out of reach, and the forts and arsenals in the North had been so stripped of defenders, by Floyd, Buchanan's Secretary of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clark, or Clarke, George Rogers -1818 (search)
ed country, embracing all the territory north of the Ohio claimed as within their limits, into the country of Illinois, and ordered 500 men to be raised for its defence. Commissioned a colonel, Clark successfully labored for the pacification of the Indian tribes. Learning that Governor Hamilton, of Detroit, had captured Vincennes, Clark led an expedition against him (February, 1779), and recaptured it (Feb. 20). He also intercepted a convoy of goods worth $10,000, and afterwards built Fort Jefferson, on the west side of the Mississippi. The Indians from north of the Ohio, with some British, raided in Kentucky in June, 1780, when Clark led a force against the Shawnees on the Grand Miami, and defeated them with heavy loss at Pickaway. He served in Virginia during its invasion by Arnold and Cornwallis; and in 1782 he led 1,000 mounted riflemen from the mouth of the Licking, and invaded the Scioto Valley, burning five Indian villages and laying waste their plantations. The savages we
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jefferson, Thomas 1743- (search)
ones, by message, to which no answer will be expected. 3. Diplomatic establishments in Europe will be reduced to three ministers. 4. The compensation of collectors depends on you [Congress], and not on me. 5. The army is undergoing a chaste reformation. 6. The navy will be reduced to the legal establishment by the last of this month [May, 1801]. 7. Agencies in every department will be revived. 8. We shall push you to the uttermost in economizing. 9. A very early recommendation Fort Jefferson, Garden Key. has been given to the Postmaster-General to employ no traitor, foreigner, or Revolutionary Tory in any of his offices. Three days after his inauguration he wrote to Monroe: I have firmly refused to follow the counsels of those who have desired the giving of offices to some of the Federalist leaders in order to reconcile them. I have given, and will give, only to Republicans under existing circumstances. The doctrine, To the victor belong the spoils, which has been accepte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jefferson, Fort (search)
Jefferson, Fort A fortification built by Col. George Rogers Clark (q. v.), on the west side of the Mississippi. He had designed to extend his invasion to Detroit, but troops to reinforce him had been added to the force of another bold leader (see Shelby, Evan), and he had to abandon the undertaking. Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, gave instructions for the occupation of a station on the Mississippi River between the mouth of the Ohio and the parallel of 36° 30′; and in the spring of another bold leader (see Shelby, Evan), and he had to abandon the undertaking. Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, gave instructions for the occupation of a station on the Mississippi River between the mouth of the Ohio and the parallel of 36° 30′; and in the spring of 1780 Clarke chose a strong position 5 miles below the mouth of the Ohio, whereon he built Fort Jefferson. Here the Americans planted their first sentinel to watch over the freedom of the navigation of the Father of w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fort Jefferson and Fort Taylor, (search)
Fort Jefferson and Fort Taylor, At the Garden Key, one of the Tortugas Islands, off the extremity of the Florida Peninsula, was Fort Jefferson; and at Key West was Fort Taylor. Neither of these forts was quite finished at the beginning of 1861. The Confederates early contemplated their seizure, but the laborers employed on them by the United Fort Taylor, Key West. States government were chiefly slaves, and their masters wished to reap the fruit of their labor as long as possible. It waFort Jefferson; and at Key West was Fort Taylor. Neither of these forts was quite finished at the beginning of 1861. The Confederates early contemplated their seizure, but the laborers employed on them by the United Fort Taylor, Key West. States government were chiefly slaves, and their masters wished to reap the fruit of their labor as long as possible. It was believed these forts might be seized at anytime by the Floridians. Captain Brannan, with a company of artillery, occupied barracks about half a mile from Fort Taylor. Some of the military and civil officers there were Confederates, and they determined to oppose Captain Brannan if he should attempt to take possession of that fort. Finally Captain Brannan succeeded by a stratagem in gaining possession. The steamer Wyandotte lay near the fort, and her guns commanded the bridge that connecte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pickens, Fort (search)
farther seaward, on a low sand-pit, was Fort McRae. Across from Fort Pickens, on the main, was Fort Barrancas, built by the Spaniards, and taken from them by General Jackson. Nearly a mile eastward of the Barrancas was the navy-yard, then in command of Commodore Armstrong. Before the Florida ordinance of secession was passed (Jan. 10, 1861) the governor (Perry) made secret preparations with the governor of Alabama to seize all the national property within the domain of Floridanamely, Fort Jefferson, at the Garden Key, Tortugas; Fort Taylor, at Key West; Forts Pickens, McRae, and Barrancas, and the navy-yard near Pensacola. Early in January the commander of Fort Pickens (Lieut. Adam J. Slemmer), a brave Pennsylvanian, heard rumors that the fort was to be attacked, and he took immediate measures to save it and the other forts near. He called on Commodore Armstrong (Jan. 7) and asked his co-operation, but having no special order to do so, he declined. On the 9th Slemmer received in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St. Clair, Arthur 1734-1818 (search)
forays caused the Indians to fight more desperately for their country. Congress then prepared to plant forts in the Northwestern Territory, and in September there were 2,000 troops at Fort Washington, under the immediate Map of the Northwestern Territory. command of Gen. Richard Butler. With General St. Clair as chief, these troops marched northward. They built Fort Hamilton, on the Miami River, 20 miles from Fort Washington, and garrisoned it. Forty-two miles farther on they built Fort Jefferson, and, when moving from that post, late in October, there were evidences that Indian scouts were hovering on their flanks. The invaders halted and encamped on a tributary of the Wabash, in Darke county, O., 100 miles north from Fort Washington (now Cincinnati). There the wearied soldiers slept (Nov. 3), without suspicion of danger near. During the night the sentinels gave warning of prowling Indians, and early the next morning, while the army were preparing for breakfast, they were f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
he first claim considered was that of Isaac Shelby's to settlement and pre-emption for raising a crop of corn in the county in 1176 ......Oct. 13, 1779 In retaliation for Colonel Clarke's successes in Illinois, Colonel Byrd, of the British army, is sent against Ruddle's and Martin's stations in Kentucky, captures them, and retreats with plunder and prisoners to Detroit......June 22, 1780 County of Kentucky divided into Jefferson, Fayette, and Lincoln counties......Nov. 1, 1780 Fort Jefferson, built on the Mississippi River, 5 miles below the mouth of the Ohio. Besieged by Chickasaw Indians, reinforced by General Clarke from Kaskaskia, and soon after abandoned as too remote to hold......1780 Captain Estill, in pursuit of Indians who had invested Estill's station, overtakes them near Mount Sterling, and in the fight loses his life......March 22, 1782 Battle of Blue Licks......Aug. 19, 1782 General Clarke, with 1,050 men, ends Indian invasions in Kentucky......Novembe