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Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 10 0 Browse Search
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Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 1 (search)
Many times have I wondered at those who first convoked the national assemblies and established the athletic games,Pan-Hellenic gatherings at the Olympic, Pythian, Nemean and Isthmian games, including also the Pan-atheniac festival at Athens. See Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 269 ff. amazed that they should have thought the prowess of men's bodies to be deserving of so great bounties, while to those who had toiled in private for the public good and trained their own minds so as to be able to help also their fellow-men they apportioned no reward whatsoever,This is not quite exact (see Lys. 33.2), nor consistent with § 45 where he mentions contests of intellect and prizes for them. But the mild interest which these evoked served but to emphasize the excess of enthusiasm for athletics against which Isocrates here and elsewhere protests. Cf. Isoc. 15.250 and Isoc. Letter 8.5. The complaint is older than Isocrates. See Xenophanes, Fr.
Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 28 (search)
two gifts, the greatest in the world—the fruits of the earth,Cf. Plat. Menex. 237e; Lucret. vi. 1 ff. which have enabled us to rise above the life of the beasts, and the holy riteFor the Eleusinian Mysteries see Lobeck, Aglaophamus, vol. i; Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 274 ff.; Gardner's New Chapters in Greek History, xiii; Diehl, Excursions in Greece viii. which inspires in those who partake of it sweeter hopesQuoted in Isoc. 8.34. For the blessedness of rise above the life of the beasts, and the holy riteFor the Eleusinian Mysteries see Lobeck, Aglaophamus, vol. i; Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 274 ff.; Gardner's New Chapters in Greek History, xiii; Diehl, Excursions in Greece viii. which inspires in those who partake of it sweeter hopesQuoted in Isoc. 8.34. For the blessedness of the Mystics see HH Dem. 480 ff.; Pindar, Fr. 102; Sophocles, Fr. 753 Nauck. regarding both the end of life and all eternity
Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 43 (search)
Now the founders of our great festivals are justly praised for handing down to us a custom by which, having proclaimed a truceThe armistice or “Peace of God”—the sacred month as it was called at Olympia—during which the states participating in the games ceased from war. See Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, p. 270. and resolved our pending quarrels, we come together in one place, where, as we make our prayers and sacrifices in common, we are reminded of the kinship which exists among us and are made to feel more kindly towards each other for the future, reviving our old friendships and establishing new ties.Lys. 33.1, speaks of Heracles as having founded the Olympic festival out of good will for
Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 107 (search)
On account of these services it becomes all thinking men to be deeply grateful to us, much rather than to reproach us because of our system of colonization;Allotments of lands to Athenian colonists in Greek territory, as in Scione and Melos. See note on 101. For these “cleruchies,” as they were called, see Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 602 ff. for we sent our colonies into the depopulated states for the protection of their territories and not for our own aggrandizement. And here is proof of this: We had in proportion to the number of our citizens a very small territory,The total population including foreign residents and slaves is reckoned at about 500,000; the total area is about 700 square miles. but a very great empire; we possessed twice as many ships of war as all the rest combined,See Thuc. 2.13 and Thuc. 8.79. and these were strong enough to engage double their number; at the very borders of Attica lay Eubo
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
, Strabo takes no account. In the case of those who sail across from Greece or Asia, the more direct route is to Brentesium, and, in fact, all who propose to go to Rome by land put into port here. There are two roadsOn these roads see Ashby and Gardner, The Via Trajana, Paper of the British School at Rome, 1916, Vol.VIII, No. 5, pp. 107 ff. from here: one, a mule-road through the countries of the Peucetii (who are called Poedicli),Cp. 6. 3. 1. the Daunii, and the Samnitae as far as Beneventumither, and for this reason neither should I myself make positive assertions about them. From Barium to the Aufidus River, on which is the Emporium of the CanusitaeThis Emporium should probably be identified with the Canne of today (see Ashby and Gardner, op. cit., p. 156). is four hundred stadia and the voyage inland to Emporium is ninety. Near by is also Salapia,Now Salpi. the seaport of the Argyrippini. For not far above the sea (in the plain, at all events) are situated two cities, Canusiu