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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 26 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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gton9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsbian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
er Colonel Eggleston having been sent by rail to that place immediately after the receipt of the telegram just mentioned from General Sherman. General E. M. McCook, with a detachment of seven hundred men, was directed to proceed by rail to. Albany, Georgia, and march thence by the most direct route to Tallahassee, Florida, while General Croxton, with the remainder of this division, was held at Macon, with orders issued subsequently to watch the line of the Ocmulgee river from the mouth of Yellow creek to Macon. General Minty, commanding the Second Division--general Long having been wounded at Selma — was directed, about the same time, to send detachments to Cuthbert and Eufaula, and to watch the line of the Ocmulgee, from the right of the First Division to Abbeville, and as much of the Flint and Chattahoochee, to the rear, as practicable. The ostensible object of this disposition of troops was to secure prisoners and military stores, and to take possession of the important strategic
August 13. A collision occurred off Ragged Point, on the Potomac River, Va., between the steamers Peabody and West-Point, by which seventy-three lives were lost. The West-Point was en route for Washington with convalescents from the army of General Burnside.--Colonel Guitar overtook Poindexter's guerrillas again at Yellow Creek, Clinton County, Mo., routed and scattered them in utter confusion, taking sixty prisoners.--The French bark Harriet Ralli was released by the government authorities of the United States. The One Hundred and Tenth regiment of New York Volunteers left their encampment near Elmira, for Washington.--A battle was fought this day near Clarendon, Ark., between the division of Gen. Hovey, consisting of six regiments of infantry and eight regiments of cavalry, and a part of Hindman's force, which had been sent forward from Little Rock to check the advance of the Union army. The battle raged some time with destructive results. The Eleventh Indiana regiment
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
direction of Pittsburg Landing. But it was successfully accomplished by a battalion of Ohio cavalry, under Major Hayes, in the midst of a series of heavy thunder-showers. A train, crowded with Confederate troops, came down while the bridge and trestle-work were burning, and escaped capture by reversing the engine and fleeing at railway speed. Pittsburg Landing, in 1866. General Sherman's division was sent farther up the river to Tyler's Landing, March 14, 1862. at the mouth of Yellow Creek, just within the borders of Mississippi, to strike the Charleston and Memphis railway at Burnsville, a little east of Corinth. Floods prevented his reaching the railway, when, by order of General Smith, he turned back and disembarked at Pittsburg Landing, and took post in the vicinity of Shiloh Meeting-house, Shiloh Meeting-House. a little log-building in the forest, about two miles from the Tennessee River, that belonged to the Methodists. General Stephen A. Hurlbut took possession
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 14-17, 1862.-expedition from Savannah, Tenn., to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. (search)
March 14-17, 1862.-expedition from Savannah, Tenn., to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Reports, etc. No. 1.-Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman, U. S. Army, commanding expedition, with abstract from Record of events in his division for the month of March, 1862. No. 2.-Maj. Elbridge G. Ricker, Fifth Ohio Cavalry, of expedition against Memphis and Charleston Railroad. No. 3.-Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles, C. S. Army, of landing at Pittsburg, Tenn., with orders. eneral commanding, received at 10 a. m. on the 14th instant, I started from Savannah at 12 m. with my division, embarked in nineteen steamboats, escorted by the gunboat Tyler, Commander Gwin. We proceeded steadily up the river to the mouth of Yellow Creek, reaching that point at Tyler's Landing at 7 p. m. I ordered the immediate debarkation .of the cavalry, consisting of six companies of the Fifth Ohio, under command of Maj. E. G. Ricker, and ordered him, under the guidance of a man named Bird,
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ichigan and Seventh Illinois, made a reconnaissance to Burnsville and Iuka and the country lying between Chambers and Yellow Creeks. He was absent two days, thoroughly exploring the country by forced marches. He took several prisoners, but met wit southeasterly direction 10 miles, came to an extensive swamp 4 miles this side of Burnsville and stream — a branch of Yellow Creek, running northeast, over which the enemy had destroyed the bridge. The bed of the creek for a long distance above and for heavy loads, and at that time obstructed by timber which the enemy had felled. Moving my command northeast, between Yellow and Indian Creeks, I discovered the enemy (in force reported) did not exceed 80 men, and that they had already recrossed Colonel Elliott, May 27 left camp at Farm. ington at 1 a. m.; marched over a very broken country to the main ford of Yellow Creek; crossed that evening the railroad above Iuka about 2 miles, keeping a southerly course. Bivouacked at 2 a. m. at a g
--Information just received that the enemy is landing troops at the mouth of Yellow Creek, about 2 1/2 miles from this place. I have just returned from making a recoad retired from that point. Last night the enemy landed near the mouth of Yellow Creek, but in what strength we have been unable to ascertain, in consequence of thsend all your cavalry, except so many as may be needed for couriers, down to Yellow Creek, to observe the movements of the enemy and harass and check them in any attee West. Hold your force well in hand for every emergency, and reconnoiter Yellow Creek without delay. Daniel Ruggles, Brigadier-General. General orders, no. 5f enemy to-day; that they are landing troops from two transports at mouth of Yellow Creek. Braxton Bragg, Major-General. headquarters, Corinth, March 24, 1862. Gen, 1862. Col. B. H. Helm, Commanding at Tuscumbia: Our pickets at mouth of Yellow Creek report three gunboats and three transports with troops passed up at 10 a. m.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
us.—8. Battle near Fort Fillmore, N. M.; Unionists victorious. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, in respect to all persons arrested under it, suspended; also for the arrest and imprisonment of persons who by act, speech, or writing discourage volunteer enlistments.—11. Skirmishes near Williamsport, Tenn., and also at Kinderhook, Tenn.; Confederates defeated. Independence, Mo., surrendered to the Confederates.—12. Gallatin, Tenn., surrendered to Morgan's guerillas. Battle at Yellow Creek, Clinton co., Tenn.; Confederates defeated.—18. Confederate Congress reassembled at Richmond.—19. Department of the Ohio formed of the States of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and Kentucky east of the Tennessee River, and including Cumberland Gap. Cavalry expedition to Charleston, Mo.—20. Clarkesville, on the Cumberland, Tenn., surrendered to the Confederates.—21. Gallatin, Tenn., surrendered to the Confederates.—22. Catlett's Station, Va., captured by Stuart's ca
sition of Monterey, about half-way from Corinth to Pittsburg or Hamburg; for though he had selected Corinth as the chief point of concentration for his reinforcements, yet, from examination of the map, the advanced position of Monterey seemed to offer such advantages for a sudden offensive movement, in case the enemy should land at either of those places, that he was inclined to substitute Monterey for Corinth, as he could move from either with equal facility, to the defensive position of Yellow Creek, in advance of Burnsville, should the enemy decide upon effecting a landing at Eastport. General Bragg, however, having reported in favor of Corinth, on account of the character of the roads and the deficiency of transportation among the reinforcements arriving there, Corinth remained, as originally determined upon by General Beauregard, the grand central point for the rallying and concentration of all the Confederate forces. The services of the officers General Beauregard had called
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
rump's Landing Tenn. March 8-14. Expedition from Savannah to Yellow Creek Miss. and occupation of Pittsburg Landing March 14-17. Black Moved to Savannah, Tenn., March 6-10, 1862. Expedition to Yellow Creek and Occupation of Pittsburg Landing March 14-17. Battle of Shn., February 12-16. Moved to Savannah, Tenn. Expedition to Yellow Creek and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Batts about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 8-14. Expedition to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. oved to Savannah, Tenn., March 10-14, 1862. Expedition to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. ducah, Ky., to Savannah, Tenn., March 6-10. Expedition to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Jumpertown May 12. Kossuth May 24. Cartersville June 6. Yellow Creek June 8. Seward House and Jumpertown July 11. Jacinto Augus
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