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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 32 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Ambassage of Master Henry Roberts, one of the sworne Esquires of her Majesties person, from her highnesse to Mully Hamet Emperour of Marocco and the King of Fesse, and Sus, in the yeere 1585: who remained there as Liger for the space of 3. yeeres. Written briefly by himselfe. (search)
e. UPON an incorporation granted to the Company of Barbary Marchants resident in London, I Henry Roberts one of her Majesties sworne Esquires of her person, was appointed her highnesse messenger, and Agent unto the aforesaid Mully Hamet Emperor of Marocco, king of Fesse, and Sus. And after I had received my Commission, instructions, and her Majesties letters, I departed from London the 14. of August in the yeere 1585. in a tall ship called the Ascension, in the company of the Minion and Hopewell , and we all arrived in safetie at Azafi a port of Barbary, the 14. of September next following. The Alcaide of the towne (being the kings officer there, and as it were Maior of the place) received mee with all humanitie and honour, according to the custome of the Countrey, lodging me in the chiefest house of the towne, from whence I dispatched a messenger (which in their language they call a Trottero) to advertise the Emperour of my arrivall : who immediatly gave order, and sent certaine s
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
the Aide being Amirall, was the Generall Captain Frobisher. 2 In the Thomas Allen Viceadmirall Yorke. 3 In the Judith Lieutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy nd in his Pinnesse to fetch his men aboord, but the winde grewe so great immediatly upon their landing, that the shippes at Sea were in great danger, and some of them forcibly put from their ankers, and greatly feared to be utterly lost, as the Hopewell , wherein was Captaine Carew and others, who could not tell on which side their danger was most: for having mightie rockes threatning on the one side, and driving Islands of cutting yce on the other side, they greatly feared to make shipwracke,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
the Aide being Amirall, was the Generall Captain Frobisher. 2 In the Thomas Allen Viceadmirall Yorke. 3 In the Judith Lieutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy nd in his Pinnesse to fetch his men aboord, but the winde grewe so great immediatly upon their landing, that the shippes at Sea were in great danger, and some of them forcibly put from their ankers, and greatly feared to be utterly lost, as the Hopewell , wherein was Captaine Carew and others, who could not tell on which side their danger was most: for having mightie rockes threatning on the one side, and driving Islands of cutting yce on the other side, they greatly feared to make shipwracke,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage of Captaine Frobisher, pretended for the discoverie of Cataia, by Meta Incognita, Anno Do. 1578. (search)
the Aide being Amirall, was the Generall Captain Frobisher. 2 In the Thomas Allen Viceadmirall Yorke. 3 In the Judith Lieutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy nd in his Pinnesse to fetch his men aboord, but the winde grewe so great immediatly upon their landing, that the shippes at Sea were in great danger, and some of them forcibly put from their ankers, and greatly feared to be utterly lost, as the Hopewell , wherein was Captaine Carew and others, who could not tell on which side their danger was most: for having mightie rockes threatning on the one side, and driving Islands of cutting yce on the other side, they greatly feared to make shipwracke,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of the ships with their severall Captaines. (search)
The names of the ships with their severall Captaines. 1 In the Aide being Amirall, was the Generall Captain Frobisher. 2 In the Thomas Allen Viceadmirall Yorke. 3 In the Judith Lieutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy Moyles. 10 In the Moone Upcot. 11 In the Emmanuel of Bridgewater Newton . 12 In the Salomon of Weymouth Randal. 13 In the Barke Dennis Kendal . 14 In the Gabriel Harvey . 15 In the Michael Kinnersley. The sayd fifteene saile of ships arrived
to dispatch the two Barkes and the Busse of Bridgewater, for their loading, whereby to get the companies and other things aboord. The Captaine of the Anne Francis having most part of his company ashore, the first of September went also to Beares sound in his Pinnesse to fetch his men aboord, but the winde grewe so great immediatly upon their landing, that the shippes at Sea were in great danger, and some of them forcibly put from their ankers, and greatly feared to be utterly lost, as the Hopewell , wherein was Captaine Carew and others, who could not tell on which side their danger was most: for having mightie rockes threatning on the one side, and driving Islands of cutting yce on the other side, they greatly feared to make shipwracke, the yce driving so neere them that it touched their bolt-sprit. And by meanes of the Sea that. was growne so hie, they were not able to put to sea with their small Pinnesses to recover their shippes. And againe, the shippes were not able to tarrie
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Charles Leigh, and divers others to Cape Briton and the Isle of Ramea. (search)
us by the other shippe, which afterward was quieted. The second day of August, having taken in water and wood, we put to sea from that harborow in company of the Hopewell , with purpose to go directly to Parlican, which is an harborow in the North part of Newfoundland , where we expected another prize. But when we came to sea we fot, as that we were constrained to make our resolution directly for England : whereupon we drew out our reasons the fourth day of August, and sent them aboord the Hopewell , to certifie them the cause of our resolution for England : wherat they were generally offended, thinking and saying, that we in the prize went about to cousin aof warre. The next day being the fift of August, having a faire winde, we put off from the coast of Newfoundland , and kept our course directly for England , the Hopewell keeping us company untill midday, whenas having lost us in a fogge, she shot off two pieces of ordinance, and we answered her with three: afterwards we spake not
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
us committing the reliefe of my discomfortable company the planters in Virginia , to the merciful help of the Almighty, whom I most humbly beseech to helpe & comfort them, according to his most holy wil & their good desire, I take my leave: from my house at Newtowne in Kylmore the 4 of February, 1593.Your most welwishing friend, JOHN WHITE. The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590.THE 20 of March the three shippes the Hopewell , the John Evangelist, and the Little John, put to Sea from Plymmouth with two small Shallops. The 25 at midnight both our Shallops were sunke being towed at the ships stearnes by the Boatswaines negligence. On the 30 we saw a head us that part of the coast of Barbary, lying East of Cape Cantyn, and the Bay of Asaphi. The next day we came to the Ile of Mogador, where rode, at our passing by, a Pinnesse of London called the Mooneshine. Aprill
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590. (search)
The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590.THE 20 of March the three shippes the Hopewell , the John Evangelist, and the Little John, put to Sea from Plymmouth with two small Shallops. The 25 at midnight both our Shallops were sunke being towed at the ships stearnes by the Boatswaines negligence. On the 30 we saw a head us that part of the coast of Barbary, lying East of Cape Cantyn, and the Bay of Asaphi. The next day we came to the Ile of Mogador, where rode, at our passing by, a Pinnesse of London called the Mooneshine. Aprill.ON the first of Aprill we ankored in Santa Cruz rode, where we found two great shippes of London lading in Sugar, of whom we had 2 shipboats to supply the losse of our Shallops. On the 2 we set sayle from the rode of Santa Cruz, for the Canaries. On Saturday the 4 we saw Alegranza, the East Ile of the Canaries. On Sunday the 5
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
g lerboord tacked, and they sterboord) we made her spring her looffe, and by a fortunate shot which our gunner made, pierced her betwixt winde and water. Hereupon shee was forced to lay herselfe upon the carena, and to stand with one of the other ships for ayde. Afterward (commending our selves to almightie God in prayer, and giving him thankes for the winde which he had sent us for our deliverance) we looked forth and descryed two saile more to the offen: these we thought to have bene the Hopewell , and the Swallow that had stoode in to ayde us: but it prooved farre otherwise, for they were two of the kings gallies. Nowe having a loome gale of winde, wee shipped our oars, and rowed off the shore: and our watch was no sooner set, but wee espied one gallie under our lee hard by us, boging up with us. Then (because it was evening) one of the great ships discharged sixe great shot at us, to the ende the gallies should knowe that wee were the shippe they looked for. Then the gallie came
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