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een Medford River and Chelmsford, by the Concord River. Here the committee were met by an almost insurmountable difficulty: the science of civil-engineering was almost unknown to any one in this part of the country. They were, however, determined to persevere; and appointed Mr. Samuel Thompson, of Woburn, who began his work, and proceeded from Medford River, at a place near the location of the present lock, and followed up the river to Mystic Pond, through the pond and Symmes's River, to Horn Pond in Woburn, and through said pond to the head thereof. Meeting here bars they could neither let down nor remove, they went back to Richardson's Mill, on Symmes's River, and passed up the valley, through the east part of Woburn, to Wilmington, and found an easy and very regular ascent until they reached Concord River; a distance travelled, as the surveyor says, from Medford Bridge to the Billerica Bridge, about twenty three miles; and the ascent he found to be, from Medford River to the Co
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex Canal. (search)
mence the necessary surveys of the most eligible route between Medford River, Chelmsford, and the Concord River. Here the committee were met by an almost insurmountable difficulty; the science of Civil Engineering was almost unknown to anyone in this part of the country. They were, however, determined to persevere, and appointed Mr. Samuel Thompson, of Woburn, who began his work, and proceeded from Medford River, following up the river to Mystic Pond, through the pond and Symms' River to Horn Pond in Woburn, and through said pond to the head thereof. Meeting here bars they could neither let down nor remove, they went back to Richardson's Mill on Symms' River, and passed up the valley through the east part of Woburn to Wilmington, and found an easy and very regular ascent until they reached the Concord River, a distance traveled, as the surveyor says, ‘From Medford Bridge to the Billerica Bridge, about twenty-three miles, and the ascent he found to be, from Medford River to the Co
ollege, Charlestown Graduates of Previous to170160 Harvard Graduates, Sibley37 Haven, George47 Hawes, Frank Mortimer15, 32, 58 Hay, William, Schoolmaster, 172165 Hayden, Joseph O.6, 74 Hayes, John S.2 Hayes, John S., Addresses of2 Hearse House, The42 Hertford County, England19 Heyman, Samuel60, 62 Heymond, Samuel61 Highland Avenue, Somerville22, 45 Hill, Colonel Herbert E.2 Hinckley, Mrs. James H.104 Historical Sketch of Old Middlesex Canal49 Hooksett Locks and Canal50, 57 Horn Pond, Woburn53 Huguenots, The10,11,12 Hunt, M. Agnes13 Hunt, Rev. Samuel103, 104 Hutchinson Collection, The42 Hutchinson, Mrs. Jacob T.104 Indian Wars, The40 Inman House, The, Cambridge94 Ipswich Female Seminary103 Ipswich, Mass.20, 40 Ireland, Shadrach15 Israel Putnam and Bunker Hill85 Israel Putnam and Prospect Hill85 Jackson, George Russell6 Jaques, Samuel53, 55 Jennor (Jenner), Elizabeth62 John Abbot Lodge101 Kemble, Miss4 Kentucky7 Kettell, Deacon Joseph60 King's Chapel
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex canal. (search)
ide banks, and passed to the rear of the present public library building and under the road near Wilson's Tavern. This tavern has since been the homestead of the late Ruel Carter, and was destroyed by fire about 1886. The canal passed through Horn pond, where there was a very important engineering feature, and known as Horn pond, or Stoddard locks. At this point there was a descent of fifty feet by three sets of double stone locks, the middle set being separated from that above and below by Horn pond, or Stoddard locks. At this point there was a descent of fifty feet by three sets of double stone locks, the middle set being separated from that above and below by a basin-line expansion or widening of the canal, by which the draft of water by locking was equalized. Two of these locks were of hammered granite. These locks were so near Boston, the journey thither in the packet boat, General Sullivan, was such a pleasant one, the view of the canal and lake was so picturesque and interesting, that the place speedily became a popular resort. Pleasure boats plied the lake, Kendall's Boston brass band and the Brigade band of Boston rendered sweet harmony, an
ngham, Mass., 34, 44. Historic Genealogical Register, New England, 80. Historic Heights and Points, 60. History of Medford, Brooks-Usher, 15. Hittenger, —, 40, 65. Holbrook, Samuel, 68. Hooker, —, 74. Hopkins Classical School, 70. Horn Pond, 2. Horn Pond Brook, 3. Horn Pond House, 3, 7. Horn Pond Locks, 2, 3. Hotten, Camden, 50. Houghton (family), 24. Hunt, William, 55. Hurd, Mercy, 55. Hutchinson, Samuel, 16. Increase, Ship, 73. Ipswich, Mass., 78. Jackson, Dr. ChaHorn Pond Locks, 2, 3. Hotten, Camden, 50. Houghton (family), 24. Hunt, William, 55. Hurd, Mercy, 55. Hutchinson, Samuel, 16. Increase, Ship, 73. Ipswich, Mass., 78. Jackson, Dr. Charles T., 9. Jackson, Edward, 76. Jackson, Patrick T., Esq., 8. Jackson, Richard, 76. James, King, 27, 28, 77. Jane, 88. Jaques, Colonel, 24, 41. Jaques, William, 41. Jenner, Thomas, Town Clerk, 11. Jenny, 88. Johnson, John, 82. Jones, Dorcas, 85. Jones, Ruth, 68. Keene, Sarah A. (Vinal), 71. Kendall's Boston Brass Band, 2. Kent, Benjamin, 88. Kent, Ebenezer, 43, 88. Kent, Joseph, 14, 15, 16, 88. Kent, Lucy, 89. Kent, Mehitable, 88. Kent, Rebecca, 88, 89. Kent,
spanned by a wooden aqueduct of 100 feet, Zzz Zzz resting on stone piers which now support Boston-avenue bridge. Following nearly the line of Boston avenue, it kept along the Mystic ponds, passing through Winchester west of Wedge pond to Horn pond in Woburn. Traversing Woburn and Wilmington, it crossed the Shawsheen by an aqueduct of 137 feet, and struck the Concord, from which it received its water at Billerica mills. Entering the Concord by a stone guard-lock, it crossed, with a floaoston with wholesome water. The sections between the Merrimac and Concord at one extremity and Charlestown mill-pond and Woburn at the other were to be wholly discontinued. Flowing along the open channel of the canal from the Concord river to Horn-pond locks in Woburn, from thence it was to be conducted in iron pipes to a reservoir upon Mt. Benedict in Charlestown, a hill eighty feet above the sea level. The good quality of the Concord-river water was vouched for by the analysis of four ab
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
igh street at West Medford. This was built at Mr. Peter C. Brooks' expense, at about 1820. The engineer who designed it was George Rumford Baldwin (son of Col. B.), and it is a fitting monument to his skill, as well as a gravestone to mark where the highway of the waters is buried. The towpath in summer became a favorite walk out from Boston and from the several villages, a veritable Lovers' Lane, and some of the taverns were noted as the resort of pleasure parties, notably the one at Horn Pond in Woburn. In the winter the pleasure seekers forsook the path, for with the closing of the season by the frost king, began the sport of skating. Without exception, every man with whom the writer has conversed as to his recollections of the old waterway, refers with pleasure to the long skating trips he enjoyed. These sometimes became strenuous, as when the boys of Charlestown and Medford met near the old toll-house to the slogan of Charlestown figs put on your wigs And up to Medfor
. Hooper. This completed, the lower lake will be accessible for boats at its new level, the upper reach of the river having been impassable since the closing of the dam at Cradock bridge. Then will be realized the desirability of a lock in the dam which was erected at the Partings in 1863 by the City of Charlestown, which made the erstwhile Medford pond the Upper and Lower Mystic lakes. Should one be built, it may be possible to go from Boston to Lake Innitou (choose between this name, Horn pond or Lake of the Woods of 1819) by motor boat, as well as to Spy pond in Arlington or Fresh pond in Cambridge, as Winchester is planning a water park all its own. Under date of May 2, 1856, Caleb Swan interleaved his copy of Brooks' history with the following:— White Island is within an eighth of a mile above Malden Bridge. In very high tides it is covered with water, same as the surrounding marshes; it contains about 14 acres. It was bought of the Town of Charlestown about 1787 b
iver, and the rife of Shashin river, one of the confiderable branches of the Merrimeck, as also the first rife of Mistick river and ponds. Evidently this ancient historian, settler and man of affairs, considered the Aberjona the main stream, and its head waters away up in Wilmington the first rife of the Mistick. But another has its source away on the hills in Woburn near Lexington line, and coming down through the picturesque Shaker glen, receives the tributaries, lingers a while in Horn pond (Lake Innitou) and Wedge Pond (Echo Lake), and joins the Aberjona in Winchester. Still another in Stoneham reaches the main stream two miles farther up in Montvale. On the Aberjona, Edward Converse built one of the earliest grist mills in the colony, and only recently has the power ceased to be used. Still, the fall remains, but as an ornamental feature. There were as many as fourteen mill privileges on this Aberjona and its tributaries. Two other brooks contribute to the flow of
rgaret Curzon, The first-named died in Brookline, May 3, 1851, and the latter in Newburyport, June 28, 1877. then at Havana, Cuba. In it is a description of an all-day excursion on the Middlesex canal on July 18, 1817. The readers of the Historical Register may be interested in it because of details which occurred in Medford. The picnic party consisted of a large gathering of what was best in the society of the old town of Boston. It was held at the Lake of the Woods, now known as Horn pond, in Woburn. The Indian name was Innitou. There were represented the Winthrops, Quincys, Amorys, Sullivans, Grays, Masons, Tudors, Eliots, Cabots, and others. Daniel Webster and wife were also of the party. Mr. Webster was then thirty-five years of age. He had taken up his residence in Boston in August of the previous year. In the following year, 1818, he was to establish his fame at the bar by his matchless argument on the great Dartmouth college case before the Supreme Court of the U
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