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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 44: retreat to Fisher's Hill. (search)
n the Winchester & Potomac Railroad, which is six miles from Winchester. Lomax's cavalry picketed in my front on the Opequon, and on my left from that stream to North Mountain, while Fitz. Lee's cavalry watched the right, having small pickets across to the Shenandoah. Four principal roads, from positions, centred at Stephenson's depot, to wit: the Martinsburg road, the road from Charlestown via Smithfield, the road from the same place via Summit Point, and the road from Berryville via Jordan's Springs. Sheridan's main force was near Berryville, at the entrenched position which has been mentioned, while Averill was at Martinsburg with a division of cavalry. Berryville is ten miles from Winchester, nearly east, and Martinsburg twenty-two miles nearly north. The crossing of the Opequon on the Berryville road is four or five miles from Winchester. From Berryville there are two good roads via White Post to the Valley Pike at Newtown and Middletown, the last two roads running east of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
charge of the acting chief of artillery for the corps, Colonel J. T. Brown. The works and their armament were alike formidable, and that they were thus rendered untenable by the enemy evinces at once the skill with which our batteries were disposed and the resolution with which they were served. The death of Captain Thompson, of the Louisiana guard artillery, a most gallant and esteemed officer, was part of the price of this victory. Retreating towards Charlestown, the enemy, near Jordan's Springs, on the morning of the 15th, encountered, with Johnson's division which had marched to intercept him, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews' artillery battalion. The sharp action ensuing, which resulted in the rout of the enemy and capture of most of his men, was especially remarkable for the unexampled steadiness with which artillery fought infantry skirmishers at close quarters. Lieutenant Contee, who commanded a section in a contest of this kind, distinguished himself by cool and persistent d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
d a half miles from Winchester, where he could either intercept the enemy's retreat, or aid in an attack, should further resistance be offered in the morning. General Johnson marched with Nicholls' and part of Stuart's brigades, accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews, with a detachment of his artillery, the Stonewall Brigade being ordered to follow. Finding the road to the place indicated by General Ewell difficult of passage in the darkness, General Johnson pursued that leading by Jordan's Springs to Stephenson's depot, where he took a favorable position on the Martinsburg road, about five miles from Winchester. Just as his line was formed, the retreating column, consisting of the main body of General Milroy's army, arrived, and immediately attacked him. The enemy, though in superior force, consisting of both infantry and cavalry, was gallantly repulsed, and finding all efforts to cut his way unavailing, he sent strong flanking parties simultaneously to the right and left, still
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. (search)
e miles north of Winchester, there was a railroad cut, masked by a body of woods and not more than two hundred yards from the turnpike (along which the enemy would certainly retreat), which would afford excellent shelter for troops in case of an engagement. The night was very dark, and being satisfied that the enemy would discover the movement and probably escape if I moved to the point indicated by the Lieutenant-General, I determined to march to Stephenson's by the road which led by Jordan's Springs. Halting the head of the column at a small bridge which crosses the Winchester and Potomac railway a few hundred yards from the Martinsburg pike, I rode forward with my staff and sharpshooters to reconnoitre the position and assure myself of the whereabouts of the enemy. I had gone but a short distance when I distinctly heard the neighing of horses and sound of men moving, and in a few moments ascertained that I had opportunely struck the head of the enemy's retreating column. Thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Winchester in 1863. (search)
Chambersburg, June 25th, 1863. Captain,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Stonewall Brigade around Winchester and Jordan's Springs on the 13th, 14th and 15th insts. At daylight on Saturday morning of the 13th, the brigade moved from its camp near Cedarville in the direction of Winchesmand as rapidly as possible, we reached the scene of action just as a portion of the enemy's forces were endeavoring to make their escape in the direction of Jordan's Springs. I ordered the Fourth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third regiments which were in rear of the column to face to the left and advanced in line of battle in the towards Berryville, and after marching several miles (a guide afterwards coming up to show the way) the brigade took a circuitous left-hand road, passing by Jordan's Springs, and was halted just before daybreak, on the 15th instant, at the small bridge where the road crosses the Winchester and Potomac railroad, about four miles f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
ered General Johnson with the Stonewall, Nicholls', and three regiments of Steuart's brigade and Dement's battery, with sections of Rains's and Carpenter's (the whole under Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews) to proceed to a point on the Martinsburg road, about two and one-half miles east of Winchester, so as to intercept any attempt to escape, or to be ready to attack at daylight if the enemy held their ground. Finding the road to this point very rough, General Johnson concluded to march via Jordan's Springs to Stephenson's Depot, where the nature of the ground would give him a strong position. Just as the head of his column reached the railroad, two hundred yards from the Martinsburg pike, the enemy was heard retreating down the pike towards Martinsburg. Forming line parallel with the pike, behind a stone wall, Steuart on the right and the Louisiana brigade on the left, twelve hundred men in all, and posting the artillery favorably, he was immediately attacked by Milroy with all his forc
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
zed at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in March 9, 1865. Left State for Harper's Ferry, W. Va., March 11. Attached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Provisional Division, Army of the Shenandoah. Duty at Charleston, Winchester, Stevenson's Depot, Jordan's Springs and Summit Point till July 27. Ordered to Baltimore, Md., July 27, and assigned to duty in the Military District of Delaware by detachments. Mustered out at Baltimore, Md., August 31, 1865. Lost during service 31 by disease. 147tring service 43 by disease. 150th Indiana Regiment Infantry. Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in March 9, 1865. Left State for Harper's Ferry, W. Va., March 13. Duty at Charleston, Winchester, Stevenson's Station and Jordan's Springs, Va., till August. Mustered out August 5, 1865. Lost during service 35 by disease. 151st Indiana Regiment Infantry. Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in March 3, 1865. Left State for Nashville, Tenn., March 6; then
complete organization. 191st Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, January and February, 1865. Moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., March 10, 1865. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Provisional Division, Army of the Shenandoah, March 20. March to Charleston March 21. Transferred to 2nd (Ohio) Brigade, 2nd Provisional Division, March 27. Duty near Charleston till April 4. Operations in the Shenandoah Valley in vicinity of Winchester, Stevenson's Depot and Jordan's Springs, April to August. Mustered out August 27, and discharged September 5, 1865. Regiment lost during service 29 Enlisted men by disease. 192nd Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, and mustered in March 9, 1865. Left State for Harper's Ferry, W. Va., March 10. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Provisional Division, Army of the Shenandoah, March 20. March to Charleston March 21. Duty there till April 4. Transferred to 2nd (Ohio) Brigade, 2nd Provisional