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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 8 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 5 1 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
was bathing, naked and unarmed. On the 11th I was placed in reserve, and moved with my command to a point about three and a half miles west, northwest from Kenesaw Mountain, and so remained the 12th and 13th, each day in line of battle, to support the Second Brigade, should it become necessary. On the 14th our line advanced abond that night bivouacked about three-fourths of a mile from the enemy's new line. On the 18th my command was advanced to a point in front of the west end of Kenesaw Mountain, and bivouacked near Noyes' Creek, which position was acquired after severe skirmishing. On the 19th my command was advanced across Noyes' Creek, driving th action, until I was ordered by you to relieve a part of Wood's division toward our left on the 2d of July. That night the enemy evacuated their position at Kenesaw Mountain, and on the 3d the brigade marched with the division through Marietta and bivouacked near the railroad about four miles south of that place. During the day
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 41 (search)
W. Motherspaw, Seventy-third Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Seventy-Third Illinois Infantry Vols., Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the recent campaign: The Seventy-third Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers marched from Cleveland, Tenn., May 3, 1864, numbering about 250 guns; was engaged in action at Resaca, Ga., May 14 and 15; at Adairsville May 17; in various skirmishes from Dallas to Kenesaw Mountain; in the action of June 27 at Kenesaw; that of July 20 at Peach Tree Creek; in the operations before Atlanta from July 22 to August 26, and in the engagement at Jonesborough, Ga., on September 1. The casualties in the command have been 2 commissioned officers wounded, 16 enlisted men killed or died of wounds, and 37 wounded, making a total of 55. To my officers and men I return my hearty thanks for their prompt obedience to my orders and ready performance of duty at all times.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
9 a. m. advanced through woods, across a marsh and creek, the men wading to their middles, and occupied works from which the enemy had just been driven by the skirmishers of General Harker's brigade. During part night and all this day it rained continuously. Loss in regiment, 1 man killed, 2 men wounded. June 19, brigade advanced slowly to-day; the Thirty-sixth Illinois skirmished with the enemy, who were driven two miles and finally came to a stand in a line of works at the foot of Kenesaw Mountain. June 20, built a line of works to-day under fire from the rebel batteries. No one hurt in the regiment, although several of the tents were struck. At dark regiment relieved by troops of the Fourteenth Army Corps and moved to the right, where we went on picket. June 21, moved to right about one mile, relieving troops of Twentieth Army Corps in works. In the afternoon the Forty-fourth Illinois advanced as skirmishers one-half mile, supported by this regiment. A new line was establis
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
econd Division, Fourth Army Corps. May 14 and 15, it was engaged with the enemy at Resaca. May 17, skirmished from Calhoun, Ga., to Pleasant Hill; engaged at Pleasant Hill from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m. May 25, took position at New Hope Church, on left of Twentieth Army Corps; engaged constantly in skirmishing for eleven days. June 6 and 7, covered removal of hospital, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. 18th, supported skirmish line at Mud Creek. 19th, skirmished on Noonday Creek, in front of Kenesaw Mountain, taking 12 prisoners. 27th, formed part of column of attack on enemy's works. July 9, marched to Roswell and forded Chattahoochee River. 11th, recrossed river and returned to Rottenwood Creek. 13th, crossed river at Powers' Ferry. 20th, skirmished with the enemy, driving him and capturing three lines of skirmish pits, gained position; was attacked by enemy in afternoon, and repulsed him. July 22, moved to position in front of Atlanta and built works. August 1, moved to left of line, r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
of May near Dallas. During the stay of our army before Dallas my regiment was almost daily more or less engaged with the enemy. Companies F, G, and I, especially, suffered severely on the 27th, a new skirmish line being established on that day, and said companies being out as skirmishers. On 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th of June we guarded, with the rest of our brigade, the hospital of our corps. Joined the army again on the 9th of June. Moved on the 11th. Were again engaged June 27 near Kenesaw Mountain. My regiment, which had been relieved at 5 o'clock in the morning from picket, was posted on the left of the second line of our brigade. We moved in close column by division right in front. A terrible artillery fire and musketry received us as soon as we came outside of our breast-works and crossing an open field. When we came to a halt I deployed my regiment and covered our left flank, in which position I remained until I received orders from Brig. Gen. N. Kimball, commanding First
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 46 (search)
On the morning of the 17th it was again ascertained that the enemy had evacuated their position in our front. On the morning of the 18th advanced on the enemy by the right of companies to the front. This was accomplished with a great deal of difficulty, as the rain was pouring in torrents and the ground to be passed over almost impassable on account of mud; during the day threw up works under fire. During the night the enemy again left their position; they were again developed near Kenesaw Mountain. The next morning (20th) works were constructed which were a valuable protection in the afternoon. During the day Capt. David Y. Horning, Company E, was wounded. During the evening I was relieved from my position by a portion of the Fourteenth Army Corps. From here I marched about one and a half miles toward the right. After getting into position works were immediately constructed. On the morning of the 22d I was ordered with my command on the skirmish line. In accordance with in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
g morning my command moved out to join in the pursuit. Moving forward the distance of a mile, the enemy were again found, strongly intrenched at the base of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 22d, in accordance with orders, I relieved General Harker's brigade with my command, throwing forward the Ninety-seventh Regiment returned from Libby Prison but a few days before his death. The 24th, 25th, and 26th were spent in skirmishing with the enemy in front of their position at Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 27th I received orders to have my command in readiness at daylight to take position behind a portion of the works occupied by Generalanding. Capt. J. S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., July 1, 1864. Captain : I have the honor to forward the following as the report of casualties of my command for the month of June: Zzz Very re
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
ng another line after coming up with the enemy, during which some skirmishing was done. On the morning of the 17th the rebels were found to have evacuated, and they were followed immediately and found to have given back in the direction of Kenesaw Mountain. On the following morning my regiment was placed on picket at, 2.30 a. m., and at 8 a. m. I was ordered by Colonel Bartleson, One hundredth Illinois Volunteers, to advance the line, he being in command of the picket force from the brigadront. In this engagement Lieutenant Beitzell, of Company C, one of the most efficient officers of the command, fell. On the morning of the 19th the enemy was gone from our front and we again engaged in pursuit. They were overtaken near Kenesaw Mountain, where our lines were formed on the 21st, and where works were erected. On the 23d my regiment was placed on picket at early dawn, and I was ordered by Colonel Bartleson, officer of the day, at 3 p. m., to advance the line. About one-half
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
ed men wounded, 3 mortally. On the 19th Lieutenant-Colonel Squires went back to the hospital sick, and I succeeded him in command of the regiment. Moved forward on that day some two miles, being in reserve, and halted in close proximity to Kenesaw Mountain. Regiment in the evening was ordered to the skirmish line in front of the Fourteenth Corps and remained there until 7 a. m. the next day. Skirmishing was brisk during the night, but no casualties .occurred. Moved on the 21st with brigade aunded, 2 mortally. Lieutenant Foster, Company A, was also wounded. I was wounded myself in this engagement and was succeeded in command of the regiment by Captain Adair, Company I. July 3, after the enemy had evacuated their works near Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment moved forward, with the column five miles, via Marietta. July 4, had some skirmishing with the enemy and built works for defense. Loss in the skirmish 1 man. On the 5th marched to the Chattahoochee, near Vining's Stations Lie
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 53 (search)
he 18th of June, at Muddy Creek, while supporting battery, 2 enlisted men were wounded. On the 21st of June my regiment was ordered out to support the skirmishers (Third Kentucky Volunteers); we had 1 enlisted man wounded. On the 23d, near Kenesaw Mountain, in camp, 1 enlisted man wounded; also, while in camp, on the 26th, 1 enlisted man wounded. On the 27th, in the memorable charge made on the enemy's works near Kenesaw Mountain, my regiment was ordered in double column at half distance on tKenesaw Mountain, my regiment was ordered in double column at half distance on the third line of battle, Capt. O. O. Bagley, temporarily commanding. He advanced the regiment to the front line, when he, on account of the troops on the right falling back, was compelled to retire, losing, in commissioned officers, 1 wounded, 1 enlisted man killed, and 11 enlisted men wounded. On the 4th of July my regiment was again thrown out on the skirmish line, advancing and driving the enemy before them, the Forty-second Illinois as support, losing 2 commissioned officers wounded, 1 enl
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