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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 54 (search)
y skirmishing with the enemy. The casualties of the regiment on this day (June 18) were 2 commissioned officers and 5 enlisted men wounded. From this position the enemy withdrew on the following night, taking a new one in front of and near Kenesaw Mountain, near which our line was formed on the following day, where we again erected strong works. Thus the campaign progressed to the 27th instant, when a general assault was made upon the enemy's works, in which the regiment, commanded by Maj. S.lter, took an active part, but the assault proved fruitless, no part of the works being gained. The casualties in the regiment in this assault were 1 enlisted man killed and 4 enlisted men wounded. On the 2d of July the enemy withdrew from Kenesaw Mountain, and the day following, passing through Marietta, again confronted the enemy west of and near the Chattahoochee River. While the army was in this position the regiment accompanied the brigade and division to Roswell, sixteen miles up the ri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
deployed and advanced with great determination, drove the enemy from his pits, but received such a severe fire from his main works as to be unable to hold the ground gained. Capt. Sterling Manchester and 2 men were killed, and 12 men were wounded. Strengthened our advanced works at night. June 24, remained in position as support to the picket-line. June 25 and 26, were in rear line of trenches, resting. June 27, it having been determined to charge the enemy's works to the right of Kenesaw Mountain, the Third Brigade was designated to form one of the charging columns to assault the enemy in front of works occupied by the extreme right of the Fourth Army Corps, Colonel Opdycke, in charge of the skirmish line for the division, selected the One hundred and twenty-fifth for skirmishers, ordering that it should push ahead at all hazards, scaling the enemy's works with the head of the column, in case the charge was successful, or protecting the rear if repulsed. I deployed the regimen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
kirmishing with the enemy. Thursday night the enemy evacuated his lines, crossed Muddy Creek, and swung back toward Kenesaw Mountain. Thus was he forced from his sixth strongly intrenched position. Early Friday morning the Fourth Corps followed upavy skirmishing. Saturday night the enemy evacuated his seventh intrenched position and retired to his works around Kenesaw Mountain. Sunday morning the pursuit was renewed and the enemy pressed in on his works. Here the division remained from Sundand as a consequence no part of my division was engaged. Constant skirmishing wore away the second week in front of Kenesaw Mountain, and brought us to Saturday night, July 2. On that night the enemy evacuated his position around Kenesaw Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, being the eighth strong line of works abandoned, and retreated south of Marietta. Sunday morning, July 3, saw a renewal of the pursuit. Passing through Marietta, the enemy was found again strongly intrenched some five miles south of the town. July
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
orning the brigade marched with the division, moving south toward Marietta, near which place the enemy had taken a strong position, with his right resting on Kenesaw Mountain, his center on Pine Mountain, and his left on Lost Mountain, his line thus formed running nearly due east and west, fronting north. This brigade, being in swton's divisions, the former taking the advance and establishing their lines that night in front of the enemy's fourth and last line of works, at the base of Kenesaw Mountain, the line thus established being a little south of west of Kenesaw, the general front being east and about two and a half miles from the enemy's third line oFifteenth Corps, this brigade relieving General Woods' brigade, of Osterhaus' division. The same night, the enemy having abandoned his position on and about Kenesaw Mountain and Marietta, at daylight on the 3d, our skirmishers occupied his works in our immediate front, and advancing as far as Marietta, secured 89 prisoners, inclu
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
th Ohio. During this time, from June 22 to July 2, eleven days, our casualties were 5 killed, 13 wounded. (See schedule, marked A, for names, rank, &c.) July 2, at midnight moved to the extreme left of the army to a point opposite Little Kenesaw. During the night of the 2d the enemy abandoned his intrenchments on our front, as well as all along the line of the Kenesaw, and at daylight, July 3, we beheld with delight the Stars and Stripes floating proudly and defiantly on the summit of Kenesaw Mountain. July 3, pursued the enemy southward, passing through Marietta, and encamping three miles south, at or near Station Neal Dow. July 4, remained in camp. During the night of the 4th the enemy retreated. July 5, advanced to the bank of the Chattahoochee River, and encamped at Pace's Ferry. Remained in [camp] July 6, 7, 8, 9. July 10, took up line of march to the left of the army, as a support to the Twenty-third Corps, crossing the river. July 11, crossed the Chattahoochee River on pon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 61 (search)
ansas Infantry, of operations June 28-September 8. Hdqrs. Eighth Kansas Volunteer Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 18, 1864. Sir: In accordance with circular orders dated headquarters First Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, September 9, 1864, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Eighth Regiment Kansas Veteran Volunteers in the Date campaign against Atlanta: The regiment returned from veteran furlough and joined the brigade at Kenesaw Mountain June 28, 1864, and was with the brigade during all the marches, skirmishing, and fighting from that time until the end of the campaign. The regiment did no special service during the campaign, but with the Lrigade did its regular turns of skirmishing, picketing, fatigue, and such other duties as were required of it. The regiment assisted the brigade in building nine lines of breast-works during the campaign, and was fifty-nine days under fire. Our loss during the campaign was 6 killed
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
ed and 4 wounded), on the morning of the 20th the brigade marched to the right one and a half miles and relieved a brigade of the Twentieth Corps in front of Kenesaw Mountain. My regiment was sent out to occupy a wooded knoll taken by the Twentieth Corps the day previous. It stood out from the main line of battle, and almost detgoing on the enemy was engaged in evacuating their works, and the morning of the 3d revealed their absence from our entire front. Our casualties in front of Kenesaw Mountain from the 21st of June to July 3, 4 enlisted men and I officer wounded. In the movements of the division and brigade from Kenesaw Mountain to the ChattahoKenesaw Mountain to the Chattahoochee River we bore our part of the picketing and skirmishing of the brigade without casualties or incident deserving mention. After a refreshing rest of four days at Vining's Station we broke camp on the 10th day of July and marched up the Chattahoochee River to a point about eight miles above the station and crossed to the east
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 64 (search)
e. From this position five batteries shelled the enemy in the direction of Kenesaw Mountain. On the 18th at 6 a. m. our regiment was put into position about 300 yardks, where we remained until the enemy evacuated his third line in front of Kenesaw Mountain on the night of the 19th. Passing through the third line of the enemy's wivision of the Twentieth Corps, about one and a half miles to the right of Kenesaw Mountain and 500 yards from the enemy's fourth line of works. About 150 yards in t by the troops whom we relieved, about 200 yards from the enemy's works on Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 3d we found that the enemy had evacuated his position on and about Kenesaw Mountain, and retreated toward the Chattahoochee River. Our casualties were at this place, enlisted men, killed, 4; wounded. 8. On the 3d brigade, passing through the enemy's works, about two miles southwest of Kenesaw Mountain, thence in a southeasterly direction past the Military Academy at Marietta
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 65 (search)
hurch, where we remained until the 10th. From this date to the 22d the command moved forward at short intervals, taking up new positions and fortifying them as the enemy would take up new lines, losing a few men each day. On the 22d reached Kenesaw Mountain, or, more properly, the last position taken up before the enemy's retreat beyond Marietta. This position was separated but about 300 yards from the enemy's. We remained here maneuvering with picket-lines, losing some men every day, and on ton of duty as to deserve the highest consideration of the Government. My staff has always rendered me most efficient service. Lieut. A. G. Bierce, my topographical officer, a fearless and trusty man, was severely wounded in the head before Kenesaw Mountain on the 23d of June. Capt. S. B. Eaton, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, of my staff, was severely wounded while assisting at the crossing of Peach Tree Creek, July 19. He is an officer of rare intelligence and merit. Major
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 69 (search)
the enemy had left his position, I moved the Forty-first Regiment as skirmishers upon his works and found them occupied. On the 6th the command moved to the vicinity of Acworth, and on the 10th advanced upon the enemy's position in front of Kenesaw Mountain. On the 17th the First Regiment was severely engaged as skirmishers, and three companies of the Forty-first Regiment charged the enemy's skirmishers, strongly posted in the outbuildings of a farm-house and carried the position. On the 2The battalion was moved up in support of the skirmishers, and the main line established 500 yards from the enemy's works. Except constant picket-firing the battalion was not afterwards engaged until after the enemy evacuated the position at Kenesaw Mountain and fell back to the Chattahoochee River. In the advance to the Chattahoochee the battalion was detached to make a detour to the left, strike a pontoon bridge, and endeavor to come upon some of the enemy's trains. The battalion left the co
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