Your search returned 76 results in 29 document sections:

1 2 3
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
e President from Danville proceeded to Charlotte, N. C. We arrived at Abbeville, S. C., the morning of May 2d. At Abbeville, S. C., the Treasury officers reported the train at the depot, having been a part of the time under the escort of Admiral Raphael Semmes's little naval force to protect it from the Federal cavalry, who were raiding on a parallel line with our route, between us and the mountains. Mr. G. A. Trenholm, the Secretary of the Treasury, having been left quite ill near the Catawba River, the President appointed the Postmaster-General, Honorable John H. Reagan, acting Secretary of the Treasury, who took charge of that Department, and placed the coin under charge of the cavalry to convoy it to Washington, Ga. The party left for Washington that night, and stopped for breakfast a few miles from Washington. At our breakfast halt, when the road was taken, Mr. Benjamin came to me and said good-by, and turned off south from that point. Mr. Mallory left the party at Washingto
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
cause of the disaster was a free use of whisky (which was supplied to the soldiers by citizens with great liberality). A drunken soldier with a musket in one hand and a match in the other is not a pleasant visitor to have about the house on a dark, windy night, particularly when for a series of years you have urged him to come, so that you might have an opportunity of performing a surgical operation on him. From Columbia the army moved toward Fayetteville — the left wing crossing the Catawba River at Rocky Mount. While the rear of the Twentieth Corps was crossing, our pontoon-bridge was swept away by flood-wood brought down the river, leaving the Fourteenth Corps on the south side. This caused a delay of three days, and gave rise to some emphatic instructions from Sherman to the commander of the left wing--which instructions resulted in our damming the flood-wood to some extent, but not in materially expediting the march. On the 3d of March we arrived at Cheraw, where we foun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.115 (search)
day after entering North Carolina we crossed the Yadkin River, and on the evening of the next day thereafter reached Statesville. Here General Echols left us in order to proceed more promptly to General Johnston, who was supposed to be at Salisbury. Vaughn marched in the direction of Morganton, and I set out for Lincolnton, where I expected to find my horses and the detail, under Colonel Napier, which I had sent in charge of them to their winter quarters in that vicinity. Crossing the Catawba River on the top of the covered railroad bridge I pushed on rapidly. I had obtained credible information that the Federal cavalry under Stoneman [see foot-note, p. 495] were now certainly very near, and also marching in the direction of Lincolnton. I was very anxious to get there first, for I feared that if the enemy anticipated me the horses and guard would either be captured or driven so far away as to be entirely out of my reach. Early in the afternoon I discovered unmistakable indicat
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
ion prisoners had been removed. The prison-pens where they had suffered were destroyed. On the 17th of April, Stoneman started, with a part of his command, for East Tennessee, taking with him the prisoners, captured artillery, and thousands of negroes. On the following day, General Palmer, whose command was at Lincolnton, sent Major E. C. Moderwell, with two hundred and fifty men of the Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, to destroy the bridge of the Charlotte and South Carolina railroad,over the Catawba River. At that time, Jefferson Davis, having fled from Richmondi was at Charlotte with a very considerable force; and the mounted men of Vaughn and Duke, who had come down from the borders of Virginia, were on the Catawba. On that account it was necessary to move with great Railway bridge over the Catawba River. the writer is indebted to Major Moderwell for the above picture of the bridge. caution. At Dallas Moderwell had a skirmish with these cavalry leaders, but evaded a battle with
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
to the insurgent armies; and now the Confederate Government vanished into nothingness. The ring of Stoneman's sabers was heard, and startled the Conspirators, and away they fled on horseback, escorted by two thousand cavalry, across the Catawba, with their faces toward the Gulf of Mexico, for the way to the Mississippi and beyond, was barred. George Davis, the Attorney-General, resigned. his office at Charlotte; Trenholm gave up the place of Secretary of the Treasury on the banks of the Catawba, when Davis appointed his now useless Postmaster-General, Reagan, to take Trenholm's place, temporarily. On they went, the escort continually dwindling. Delays, said one of the party, were not now thought of; and on toward Abbeville, by way of Yorkville, in South Carolina, the party struck, taking full soldiers' allowance of turmoil and camping on the journey, only intent on pushing to certain points on the Florida coast. Rumors of Stoneman, rumors of Wilson, rumors of even the ubiquitou
n, 3.213. Capitol at Washington, proposition to blow up with gunpowder, 1.523. Carnifex Ferry, battle of, 2.95. Carrick's Ford, battle of, 1.535. Carthage, Mo., battle near, 2.43. Casey, Gen., Silas, at Seven Pines, 2.408. Cass, Gen., Lewis, letter of Gen. Wool to, 1.76; his resignation as Secretary of State, 1.77; the re-enforcement of Charleston forts urged by, 1.127; how he regarded the secession of South Carolina, 1.141. Castle Pinckney, description of, 1.117. Catawba River, railway bridge over destroyed by Major Moderwell, 3.505. Cedar Creek, battle of, 3.369. Cedar Mountain, battle of, 2.449. Cemetery at Chattanooga, visit of the author to in 1866, 3.178. Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, battles at, 3.69, 71. Centreville, McDowell's advance on, 1.587. Chambersburg, incursion of Stuart to, 2.484; Jenkins and Ewell at, 3.53; burnt by Confederates under McCausland, 3.349. Champion Hill, battle of, 2.610. Chancellorsville, Gen. Hooker at, 3
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
, by night, and to move up to Lancaster, to make believe we were bound for Charlotte, to which point I heard that Beauregard had directed all his detachments, including a corps of Hood's old army, which had been marching parallel with us, but had failed to make junction with the forces immediately opposing us. Of course, I had no purpose of going to Charlotte, for the right wing was already moving rapidly toward Fayetteville, North Carolina. The rain was so heavy and persistent that the Catawba River rose fast, and soon after I had crossed the pontoon-bridge at Rocky Mount it was carried away, leaving General Davis, with the Fourteenth Corps, on the west bank. The roads were infamous, so I halted the Twentieth Corps at Hanging Rock for some days, to allow time for the Fourteenth to get over. General Davis had infinite difficulty in reconstructing his bridge, and was compelled to use the fifth chains of his wagons for anchor-chains, so that we were delayed nearly a week in that ne
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
olonel William Preston Johnston at Colonel Henry J. Leovy's, with that patriotic family, the Monroes, of Kentucky. At Abbeville, S. C., the Treasury officers reported the train at the depot, having been a part of the time under escort of Admiral Raphael Semmes's little naval force to protect it from the Federal cavalry, who were raiding on a parallel line with our route, between us and the mountains. Mr. J. A. Trenholm, the Secretary of the Treasury, having been left quite ill near the Catawba river, the President appointed the Postmaster-General, Hon. John H. Reagan, acting Secretary of the Treasury, who took charge of that department, and placed the train under charge of the cavalry to convoy it to Washington, Ga. The party, except General John C. Breckinridge, left for Washington that night, crossing the Savannah river on a pontoon bridge, stopping for breakfast and to feed horses a few miles from Washington. Colonel Burton N. Harrison had previously left the party to join Mrs.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Confederate States of America (search)
ailway was crippled. There Davis proposed to establish the future capital of the Confederacy, but the surrender of Johnston prevented. The fugitive leaders of the government now took flight again on horseback, escorted by 2,000 cavalry. They turned their faces towards the Gulf of Mexico, for the way to Mississippi and Texas was barred. At Charlotte, George Davis, the Confederate Attorney-General, resigned his office; Trenholm gave up the Secretaryship of the Treasury on the banks of the Catawba, where Postmaster-General Reagan, having no further official business to transact, took Trenholm's place. The flight continued Gulfward, the escort constantly diminishing. At Washington, Ga., the rest of Davis's cabinet deserted him, only Reagan remaining faithful. Mallory, the Secretary of the Navy, doubtful whether his official services would be needed on the Gulf, fled, with Wigfall, to La Grange, where he met his family and was subsequently arrested; and Benjamin fled to England. D
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cowan's Ford, (search)
Cowan's Ford, On the Catawba River, N. C. Lord Cornwallis, in rapid pursuit of the Americans under General Morgan, was prevented from crossing by a sudden rise after the Americans had crossed. Cornwallis moved down a few miles towards Cowan's Ford, where Morgan had stationed 300 militia under General Davidson to oppose his crossing. The British forced a crossing, Feb. 1, 1781, and the militia were dispersed, General Davidson being killed.
1 2 3