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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 33 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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le fighting to get out of it. The cowardly stood no better chance for their lives than the fearless. Even if they surrendered, the shell of Sumter were thickly falling around them in the darkness, and, as prisoners, they could not be safe, until victory, decisive and unquestioned, rested with one or the other belligerent. The battle is over; it is midnight; the ocean beach is crowded with the dead, the dying, and the wounded. It is with difficulty you can urge your horse through to Lighthouse Inlet. Faint lights are glimmering in the sand-holes and riflepits to the right, as you pass down the beach. In these holes many a poor wounded and bleeding soldier has lain down to his last sleep. Friends are bending over them to staunch their wounds, or bind up their shattered limbs, but the deathly glare from sunken eyes tells that their kind services are all in vain. In this night assault, and from its commencement to its close, General Gillmore, his staff, and his volunteer aids, c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
ty-eight hours in the works lately thrown up on Little Folly Island. Three monitors about the same time crossed the bar and brought their formidable armaments to bear on the left flank of our position, while several barges with howitzers, in Lighthouse Inlet, flanked our right. For two hours the enemy kept up the fire from these three different points, our batteries replying vigorously. The barges of the enemy, filled with troops, having been seen in Lighthouse Inlet in the direction of BlacLighthouse Inlet in the direction of Black Island, and Oyster Point being the nearest and most accessible spot for debarkation from them, it was justly considered the one most necessary to protect, and therefore the infantry, consisting of the 21st South Carolina Volunteers, about 350 effective men, were stationed by Colonel R. F. Graham, the immediate commander of the island, on the peninsula leading to that point. In this position the infantry were unavoidably exposed to the fire of the boat howitzers, but sheltered by the nature
ed the ground from the blockading fleet, a fortnight ago. Finally, down at Lighthouse inlet, which divides Morris from Folly island, is another fortification, guardinff, mortally injured, and, limping away down the coast of Morris island to Lighthouse inlet, she had barely been relieved of her wounded, when, at 8 P. M., she sunk —. Truman Seymour, carefully concealed behind a thicket of palms just below Lighthouse inlet, with pontoons, guns, &c., all ready to rush across to Morris island and a — as on the day of Dupont's attack — confronted those of the enemy across Lighthouse inlet, which separates these from Morris island. Gillmore's plan of operationhich had been chased aground by our cruisers just south of the entrance to Lighthouse inlet. Meantime, Gen.Terry's division, 4,000 strong, and Gen. Strong's brigade 9. on small boats in Folly river, and rowed stealthily to the junction of Lighthouse inlet; where they were halted, behind a screen of marsh-grass, while Vogdes's ba<
nd, again, from Fort Wagner, is a new sandwork erected by the rebels since I surveyed the ground from the blockading fleet, a fortnight ago. Finally, down at Lighthouse Inlet, which divides Morris from Folly Island, is another fortification, covering an attempt at a landing at that point. Such is the formidable panorama the eye tach ship in the Admiral's programme, and the position as marked on the diagram — the Keokuk, which brings up the rear of the line, lying down nearly opposite Lighthouse Inlet, and the others extending on at intervals of a cable's length — the Weehawken leading the van. The wooden gunboat fleet lies in reserve outside the bar, cdenly she gives a lurch to one side, and a lurch to the other, and plunges under. She went down at eight o'clock at the spot of her original anchorage, near Lighthouse Inlet, and all that is visible of her is the upper portion of her smoke-stack. Thus ended the brief and glorious career of this interesting vessel — the first i<
laced during the preceding forty-eight hours in the works lately thrown up on Little Folly Island. Three monitors about the same time crossed the bar, and brought their formidable armaments to bear on the left flank of our position, while several barges with howitzers in Light-house inlet flanked our right. For two hours the enemy kept up the fire from these three different points, our batteries replying vigorously. The barges of the enemy, filled with troops, having been seen in Lighthouse Inlet in the direction of Black Island, and Oyster Point being the nearest and most accessible spot for debarkation from them, it was justly considered the one most necessary to protect, and therefore the infantry, consisting of the 21st South Carolina Volunteers, about 350 effective men, were stationed by Colonel R. F. Graham, the immediate commander of the island, on the peninsula leading to that point. In this position the infantry were unavoidably exposed to the fire of the boat howitz
eral Gillmore's plans should be briefly stated. He desired to gain possession of Morris Island, then in the enemy's hands, and fortified. He had at disposal ten thousand infantry, three hundred and fifty artillerists, and six hundred engineers; thirty-six pieces of field artillery, thirty Parrott guns, twenty-seven siege and three Cohorn mortars, besides ample tools and material. Admiral Dahlgren was to co-operate. On Folly Island, in our possession, batteries were constructed near Lighthouse Inlet, opposite Morris Island, concealed by the sand hillocks and undergrowth. Gillmore's real attack was to be made from this point by a coup de main, the infantry crossing the inlet in boats covered by a bombardment from land and sea. Brig.-Gen. Alfred H. Terry, with four thousand men, was to make a demonstration on James Island. Col. T. W. Higginson, with part of his First South Carolina Colored and a section of artillery, was to ascend the South Edisto River, and cut the railroad at Jack
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 5: the greater assault on Wagner. (search)
o the horizon, on the right, was the Atlantic; to the left, sand hillocks, with pine woods farther inland. Occasional squalls of rain came, bringing rubber blankets and coats into use. At one point on the beach, a box of watersoaked hard bread was discovered, and the contents speedily divided among the hungry men. Firing at the front had been heard from early morning, which toward noon was observed to have risen into a heavy cannonade. After a march of some six miles, we arrived at Lighthouse Inlet and rested, awaiting transportation. Tuneful voices about the colors started the song, When this Cruel War is Over, and the pathetic words of the chorus were taken up by others. It was the last song of many; but few then thought it a requiem. By ascending the sand-hills, we could see the distant vessels engaging Wagner. When all was prepared, the Fifty-fourth boarded a small steamer, landed on Morris Island, about 5 P. M., and remained near the shore for further orders. General G
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 7: bombardment of Charleston. (search)
y casualties, and Sumter was pounded into a mound of debris covering the lower casemates, in which the garrison found safe refuge. Through the centre of the Morris Island face of Sumter the terre-plein could be seen. Major Elliott apprehended another assault and prepared for it. In honor of some of the officers who had fallen during the operations, Gregg was renamed Fort Putnam; Wagner, Fort Strong; the Bluff Battery, Fort Shaw; the new work near Gregg, Battery Chatfield; a work on Lighthouse Inlet, Battery Purviance; and another opposite the last, on Folly Island, Fort Green. By the same order General Gillmore announced that medals of honor, his personal gift, would be furnished to three per cent of the enlisted men who had borne part in the engagements and siege. This medal, however, was not received for some months. In the case of the Fifty-fourth it was awarded to the four men specially mentioned in Colonel Hallowell's report of the assault of July 18, previously printed he
ng about 3 P. M., the Fifty-fourth at once marched to Lighthouse Inlet in a heavy rain-storm, and there crossed on a large fd by the three companies, after laboriously rowing up Lighthouse Inlet and the creeks, on the evening of the 18th. The Elevshes between Morris and James islands. The safety of Lighthouse Inlet and the inland channel from Stono depended upon its sant-Colonel Hooper assumed command of the Defences of Lighthouse Inlet on May 7. They included Black Island, Battery Purviaands. Then the Fifty-fourth held all the posts about Lighthouse Inlet. Our men at Green and Purviance in a short time becatillerists, as had those of Company H. Both works on Lighthouse Inlet were frequently engaged with the lower James Island bilton Head, on May 29, Captain Bridge took command of Lighthouse Inlet and Capt. T. L. Appleton of Fort Green. During the e did not expect attack. Major Appleton, commanding Lighthouse Inlet, made a boat reconnaissance on the night of the 29th,
and, was to front Secessionville; and he was also to send troops to John's Island to open communication with General Hatch. The navy was to assist at all these points, but more strongly in the Stono. Our batteries at Cumming's Point and on Lighthouse Inlet were to engage the enemy's attention. July 1, at 6 P. M., the Fifty-fourth moved to the landing, crossed to Folly Island on pontoon-boats and scows, and Companies E and F having joined, marched to Stono. Although the men were lightly eqday was hot and the men much exhausted. There a sutler was found, from whom some supplies were obtained. The regiment crossed the inlet on the steamer Golden Gate, whose captain kindly furnished refreshments for the officers. Our march to Lighthouse Inlet was equally severe, for the temperature was at 98°. Thence the companies repaired to their several stations, and welcomed the opportunity for rest, baths in the surf, and clean clothes. Thus the combined movements, admirably planned, agai
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