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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
an socially or morally. The How must be left to the care of individual experience. Among the good things of the day, let me thank you for your pamphlet on the Woman question, which I read with great interest; and which is the most compact and telling statement of the case I have seen. We have no intention whatever of going abroad again at present. The climate of Italy, I think, did Mrs. Lowell great good, but she is not well enough now to think of leaving home. I am glad you liked Maria's poem. Two others of hers have been published in Putnam, Necklaces, and The grave of Keats. They are all beautiful, I think, and the greatest pleasure I am capable of is to hear them appreciated. With sincere regard, I remain yours, J. R. Lowell. This was written just two months before Maria Lowell's death, and there does not exist in literature, I think, a more exquisite expression of the possible union between two thoroughly poetic natures. It was, however, a curious influence
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
till the centre for writing and publication. But new influences-such as Mrs. Radcliffe, Ossian, and the contemporary romantic ballads — are often apparent in the last decade of the century. The sentimental, the mysterious, the horrible, environed with appropriate scenery, appear here and there in the work of such poets as William Moore Smith (1759-1821), of Philadelphia, who gives evidence of this imported romanticism in The Wizard of the rock, a blend of Parnell, Percy, and Goldsmith; and Maria's grave, which is placed amid the romantic scenery pictured by the poet's originals across the Atlantic. Most distinguished personally of the Philadelphia poets was Judge Francis Hopkinson (1737-1791), See also Book II., Chap. II. signer of the Declaration of Independence, whose many occasional poems are merely as good as the average of their kind, but whose songs, some of which are suggestive of Gay and Prior, are distinctly musical and pleasing. The Rev. John Blair Linn (1777-1804),
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
rd, 243 M McDonough, Thomas, 222 McFingal, 139, 171-173, 182 McKinnon, John D., 163 McLane, Louis, 250 MacDonald, W., 125 n., 130 n., 134 n., 141 n. Madison, 146, 148, 149, 170 Madoc, 212 Magnalia, 51 Malebranche, 58 Mallet, David, 215 Man at home, the, 290 Mandeville, Bernard, 91 Mandeville, 292 Manners of the times, the, 175 Manual of American literature, a, 324 n. Map of Virginia, etc., A, 16 Marco Bozzaris, 282 Mardi, 321 Margaret, 324 Maria's grave, 177 Marion, Francis, 225, 315, 316 Marion, 220 Markoe, Peter, 175 Marks of a work of the true spirit, 62 Marmion, 220, 224, 261 Marryat, Captain, 207 Martin, Luther, 147, 148 Martin Faber, 314 Martineau, Harriet, 190, 191 Mason, George, 148 Mason, Captain John, 24 Mason, John, 167 Mason, William, 178, 278 Masque of Alfred, the, 215 Massachusettensis, 137 Massachusetts Agents, 5 Massachusetts Circular Letter, The, 132 Massachusetts Hi
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eugenie, Empress of the French. (search)
evated to the most influential post among the feminine offices,that of first lady of honor. Her husband, Count Theba, soon received additional wealth and honor, inheriting from a deceased brother the title and estates of the Count of Montijo. Maria's sister, Carlotta, soon after married an English gentleman, her cousin Thomas, the son of her father's brother, John Kirkpatrick. This gentleman had accompanied Wellington to Spain, and had served as paymaster to the English army until 1814. As Maria's husband had espoused the cause of Napoleon, and had shed his blood in fighting against Wellington, the two extremes of political antagonism were represented in the family; and yet, so far as we can learn, harmoniously represented, for the passions which had inflamed that deadly conflict yielded to the ties of family affection. Both Thomas and his wife are now dead. The third daughter, Henriquetta, married Count Cabarras, a very wealthy Spanish sugar-planter, residing near Velez Ma
ore polished one. Indeed, Johnson is my favorite among all his contemporaries. While this remarkable selection of books for daily reading gives us insight into Maria's intellectual growth and training, we have evidence also of the way in which her sister, Mrs. Preston, attended to the development of her domestic accomplishments of eight hundred and fifty, a large number in these days, and, we are told with pride, continued to increase. It was in this year, 1826, that Alexander painted Maria's portrait, which she sent to her sister, Mrs. Preston, writing, I hope you will like it. There is a glow and enthusiasm about it which belongs to the author of Hoe up his profession to edit the Massachusetts Journal, soon after their marriage, which took place in Watertown, at eight o'clock Sunday evening, Oct. 19, 1828. Maria's letter to her sister, concerning the preparations for this event, is characteristic of herself and of the simple living of that day. She had a comfortable income