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Work to be done. --There are many citizens of Richmond who would willingly take a turn at hard labor, at this time, for the purpose of aiding in the construction of an important work near this city. Let all who wish to lend a hand, proceed to Marion Hill this morning. Unemployed negroes should be sent there forthwith. More negroes are also wanted at Jamestown. Several of our citizens have been very liberal in this matter. Others should follow the example.
We understand that labor is needed at the fortifications in progress at Marion Hill. Gentlemen who wish to emulate the spirit of the noble gentlemen of Caroline in handling the spade themselves, and who have servants who can be spared for the work, have now an opportunity to exhibit their patriotism in a practical and useful manner.
Progressing. --We understand that the Principal Engineer, (Capt. E. Scott,) who has charge of the construction of the fortifications in the neighborhood of the city, is pushing the work ahead at as rapid a rate as possible, considering the disadvantages he is laboring under, the most retarding one of which is the impossibility to procure sufficient force. Those patriotic citizens who have negroes idle — and there are many in the city just now — will show their love for their country by sending them, without delay, to Marion Hill, to aid in constructing the proper defences against the invasion of the enemy. They will be well fed and taken care of while there. Let all bestir themselves in defiance of their homes and their firesides. Five hundred laborers are wanted immediatel
Visit of President Davis to Marion Hill. --Saturday morning, his Excellency Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, paid a visit to Marion Hill, accompanied by Joseph Mayo, Esq., Mayor of Richmond, to witness the progress and plaMarion Hill, accompanied by Joseph Mayo, Esq., Mayor of Richmond, to witness the progress and plan of operations going on at the aforesaid place, for the defence of the city. His Excellency arrived at Marion Hill a bout 12 M., and was received by Captain Even Soot, Chief Engineer of the fortifications at Marion Hill. The laborers were entirelMarion Hill a bout 12 M., and was received by Captain Even Soot, Chief Engineer of the fortifications at Marion Hill. The laborers were entirely ignorant of the presence of the distinguished chieftain, and as he ascended the breastwork, Captain Soot announced to them "President Davis," where upon he was welcomed with a thundering "three times three" that was heard far and near. President Marion Hill. The laborers were entirely ignorant of the presence of the distinguished chieftain, and as he ascended the breastwork, Captain Soot announced to them "President Davis," where upon he was welcomed with a thundering "three times three" that was heard far and near. President Davis was then escorted around the bastions, by Captain Soot, and he was very much pleased and gratified at the design, progress, and commanding position of the redoubts. After a stay of half an hour he took his departure for the city, and, as he m
Good Workmen. --The Superintendent of the hands at Marion Hill gives a most favorable report of the way Col. Pendleton's hands handle the "pick, shovel and hoe." Being recently off duty on Railroad work, they of course can do twice as much as the town darkies, though the latter do the best they know how, and work with a will.
The Defences of the city. --Capt. Even Soot, formerly of the Norwegian Army, has been appointed Chief Engineer of the fortifications at Marion Hill, by Col. Andrew Talcott, State Engineer, Capt. Soot was highly recommended to Gov. Letcher and Col. Talcott by his own Government, the Board of Public Works, and several eminent citizens of Virginia, as an experienced military engineer, and scientific gentleman. He constructed the fortifications to the amount of $10,000,000, for the Government if Sweden and Norway; so he has had experience in defensive warfare, and this alone convinces us that the work is in good hands, and ere many weeks elapses Richmond will be in an impregnable state against the encroachments of the enemy. When on the subject, we must not forget to all attention to Capt. Soot's able and accomplished assistant, Paul Due, Esq., recently of Charleston, S. C., and formerly of the Topographical Engineers of the U. S. Coast Survey. Mr. Due is a graduate of one of
The city handsand carts are employed at the defensive works now being created at Marion Hill. In view of the necessary absence of the force, it is hoped that citizens will promptly attend to the cleansing of gutters opposite houses occupied by them. Should this suggestion be generally followed, the health of the city, very good at this time, as the doctors assure us, will be preserved. The rain which has fallen very copiously at times during the past eight days, has acted in an eminent degree as a purifier. It could not have fallen at a more opportune season.
Runaway. --Sam, one of the convict slaves, employed in the erection of fortifications on Marion Hill, near Richmond, made his escape from the custody of the guards on Thursday evening, the 6th June, 1861, about sundown. He was received at the Penitentiary on the 8th day of April, 1861, from the county of Notteway, by the Court of which he was condemned to sale and transportation for an assault with intent to maim, &c. Said boy was at the time of his conviction the property of Joseph A. Bass, of said county of Nottoway; is 24 years of age, Dark color and about five feet high. The usual reward will be given for his apprehension and delivery at the Penitentiary. je 8--1t John C. Pryde.
Marion Hill. --The works intended for the defence of the city at the above place are now under way, and begin to assume a shape that leads us to believe that they are well calculated to answer the purpose for which they are designed. Daily hundreds of colored operatives use the pick, the shovel and the hoe to some purpose, as our citizens can find out by paying a visit to the place.
Violent assault. --On Sunday morning, about daylight, James Agen, a private in Captain Love's company, (the Rocky Point Rifles, of Mississippi,) accosted, near Marion hill, a negro having a bag of corn. Believing it to be stolen he attempted to arrest the negro, when he was violently assaulted with a stick, and so severely beaten that he was rendered insensible, in which condition he was found upon the road and taken to camp at Marion hill. Dr. Tren was sent for and dressed the wounds, wn, a private in Captain Love's company, (the Rocky Point Rifles, of Mississippi,) accosted, near Marion hill, a negro having a bag of corn. Believing it to be stolen he attempted to arrest the negro, when he was violently assaulted with a stick, and so severely beaten that he was rendered insensible, in which condition he was found upon the road and taken to camp at Marion hill. Dr. Tren was sent for and dressed the wounds, which though numerous, it is hoped are not of a dangerous character.
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