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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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November 30. Fort Esperanza, in Matagorda Bay, having been blown up and abandoned by the rebels, was occupied by the National forces under the command of Major-General C. C. Washburne.--(Doc. 17.)--the rebel blockade-runner Chatham, was captured in Doboy Sound, Ga., by the gunboat Huron.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.75 (search)
vre, surrendered. The blockade was resumed the next day by the New London and Cayuga. After the fall of Port Hudson, General Banks took up the question of Texas. His first plan was to land at Sabine Pass and strike the railroad. The expedition was composed of troops under Franklin, and the Clifton, Sachem, Granite City, and Arizona under Lieutenant Crocker. On the 8th of September the gun-boats moved up the pass to attack the enemy's fort. The Clifton ran ashore, and soon after got a shot in her boiler. The Sachem's boiler also was penetrated, and both vessels surrendered after heavy loss. The remainder retreated. Banks now decided to attack Texas near the Rio Grande, and his troops, escorted by the Monongahela and other vessels under Commander J. H. Strong, landed at Brazos November 2d. Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Aransas, and Fort Esperanza at Pass Cavallo, were captured, but owing to the lack of troops to hold the various points, no further operations were attempted.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
-hold thus gained, General Banks's plan was to occupy successively all the passes or inlets that connect the Gulf of Mexico with the land-locked lagoons or sounds of the Texas coast from the Rio Grande to the Sabine. Leaving Dana in command on the Rio Grande, a strong detachment, under Brigadier-General T. E. G. Ransom, embarked on the 16th, landed at Corpus Christi, occupied Mustang Island, crossed Aransas Pass, and moved on Pass Cavallo, where the Confederates had a strong work called Fort Esperanza, commanding the entrance to Matagorda Bay. This was captured on the 30th of December, the Confederates retiring to the mainland. These operations, though completely successful so far and at small cost, being, indeed, almost unopposed, were not satisfactory to the Government. However, General Banks, being committed to the movement, was proceeding to complete the conquest of the Texas coast by moving in force against the strong Confederate positions at Galveston and the mouth of the B
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
and, off Corpus Christi Bay, from which a force, under General T. E. G. Ransom, went to the Aranzas Pass, farther up the coast, and by a gallant assault Nov. 18, 1863. carried the Confederate works there, and captured one hundred prisoners. Corpus Christi was occupied by National troops the same day. Then a force, under General Washburne (then commanding the Thirteenth Army Corps), moved upon Pass Cavallo, at the entrance to Matagorda Bay, where the Confederates had a strong fort, called Esperanza, garrisoned by two thousand men of all arms. It was invested, and, after a sharp action, the Confederates blew up their magazine and fled, Nov. 30. most of the garrison escaping. These important conquests, achieved in the space of a month, promised a speedy closing of the coast of Texas to blockade-runners, and great advantage to the Union cause in that region. No place of importance on that coast was now left to the Confederates, excepting at the mouth of the Brazos and on Galveston
nklin attacks Sabine Pass, and is beaten off Dana surprised at Morganzia Burbridge surprised near Opelonsas Gen. Banks embarks for the Rio Grande Debarks at Brazes Santiago, and takes Brownsville capture of Aransas Pass and Pass Cavallo Fort Esperanza abandoned Indianola in our hands Banks returns to New Orleans. Galveston has one of the very few tolerable harbors which indent the continental shore line of the Mexican Gulf. The sand, everywhere impelled landward by the prevailing wins Point Isabel two days later. The Rebel works commanding Aransas Pass were next taken by assault, which gave us their guns and 100 prisoners. Moving thence on Pass Cavallo, commanding the western entrance to Matagorda Bay, our army invested Fort Esperanza, which was thereupon abandoned; most of its garrison escaping to the main land. Banks had expected to follow up this success — which gave us control of the coast from the Rio Grande to the Brazos — by a movement on Indianola or on Matagord
8   11 11 106   G   8 8   13 13 117   H   16 16   13 13 103   I 1 13 14   15 15 99   K   6 6   10 10 105 Totals 6 108 114 1 135 136 1,067 114 killed == 10.6 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 421. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Magnolia Hills, Miss. 3 Jackson, Miss. 1 Vicksburg, Miss. (May 22d) 70 Opequon, Va. 22 Vicksburg Trenches, Miss. 9 Cedar Creek, Va. 9 Present, also, at Champion's Hill; Black River Bridge; Iberia; Opelousas; Fort Esperanza; Indianola; Port Lavaca; Bermuda Hundred; Halltown; Berryville; Fisher's Hill; Woodstock. notes.--Organized at Iowa City in August, 1862, leaving the State on September 14th. It was stationed at Rolla, Mo., during the rest of the year, and at other points in Missouri until March, 1863, when it joined Grant's Army, then commencing the Vicksburg campaign. It was assigned to Lawler's (2d) Brigade, Carr's Division, Thirteenth Corps. It was engaged at Port Gibson, the opening bat
Doc. 17.-reduction of Fort Esperanza, Tex. Report of Major-General Washburn. headquarters, pass Cavallo expedition, Fort Esperanza, Texas, December 4, 1863. Major G. Norman Leiber Assistant Adjutant-General: if possible, the Pass between St. Joseph's and Matagorda Island. On arriving at this Pass, (called Cedar Bayoheadquarters Third brigade, Second division, Fort Esperanza, Texas, December, 6, 1863. Major: I have the honCedar Bayou, and encamped about seven miles up Matagorda Island, where I was joined by Colonel Washburn's brigion, Thirteenth army corps, in the reduction of Fort Esperanza, on Matagorda Island: At midnight, November Matagorda Island: At midnight, November twenty-fifth, I had succeeded, after much difficulty, in getting the whole of my force across Cedar Bayou upon in height. The enemy now opened upon us, from Fort Esperanza, with his one hundred and twenty-eight pounder,ble ammunition, and some garrison equipage. In Fort Esperanza we found one one hundred and twenty-eight pound
, and a force of two thousand men,--artillery, cavalry, and infantry,--who could be reenforced in any emergency from Houston and Galveston. The troops were under command of Major-General C. C. Washburne, then commanding the thirteenth corps. Fort Esperanza was invested, and after a most gallant action the enemy blew up his magazines, partially dismantled his defences, and evacuated the position, the major part of his men escaping to the main land by the peninsula near the mouth of the Brazos. The occupation of Brownsville and Brazos Santiago, the capture of the works and garrison at Aransas Pass, and the defeat of the enemy and the capture of his works at Fort Esperanza, by our troops, left. nothing on the coast in his possession but the works at the mouth of Brazos River and on the Island of Galveston, which were formidable and defended by all the forces of the enemy in Texas. The command of General Magruder had been withdrawn from different parts of the state, and concentrated
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
red to New Orleans, La., August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Campaign October 3-November 30. Moved to New Orleans, thence to DeCrow's Point, Tex., December 10-14. Duty at Matagorda Island and Indianola till April, 1864. Ordered to New Orleans April 19, thence to Alexandria April 23. Red River Campaign April 26-May 22. Action at Graham's Plantation May 5. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Expedition to the Atchafallton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Campaign October 3-November 30. Ordered to Algiers December 13, thence moved to Texas December 18. Duty at Matagorda Bay and Indianola till February, 1864, and at Matagorda Island till April 19. Moved to New Orleans, thence to Alexandria, La., April 19-27. Red River Campaign April 27-May 22. Actions at Alexandria April 29 and May 2 to 9. Graham's Plantation May 5. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Duty
o Vermillion Bayou October 8-30. Moved to Brazos, Santiago, Texas, November 22-26. At Matagorda Island and Indianola till March, 1864, and at Matagorda Island till June. Moved to New Orleans,Matagorda Island till June. Moved to New Orleans, La., and provost duty at Algiers, Carrollton and Thibodeaux till July 26. Moved to Morganza July 26, and duty there till September 3. Moved to mouth of White River, Ark., September 3. Duty t3, 1864, and at Indianola till March 13. Affair at Lamar February 11 (Detachment). At Matagorda Island till April. Affair Corpus Christi March 24 (Detachment). Moved to Baton Rouge, La., amber 17-23. Fort Esperanza November 27-30. Duty at Indianola till March, 1864, and at Matagorda Island till May 4. Moved to New Orleans, La., thence to join Banks on Red River, May 4-15. JNovember 14-21. Mustang Island November 17. Fort Esperanza November 27-30. Duty on Matagorda Island till April. Moved to Alexandria, La., April 20-27. Red River Campaign April 27-May 22
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