Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have been incorporated as separate and distinct towns; the former, March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war records form a part of that of the towns from which they were set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this volume. In old times the county seat was Concord; at the present time the courts of the county are held in Cambridge and Lowell. Middlesex is not only celebrated for its Revolutionary renown, but for containing Cambridge University, and the Navy Yard at Charlestown. Lowell and Waltham are well known for their cotton manufactures, as are Marlborough, Woburn, Natick, and other towns for the manufacture of shoes. The aggregate value of the agricultural and manufacturing products of the county in 1870 was $83,102,442. The surface of the county is uneven, and the soil barren. It presents a great variety for the admiration of th
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
Chapter 15: Worcester County. This is the most central, and in territory the largest county in the Commonwealth. It crosses from New Hampshire on the north to the States of Rhode Island and Connecticut on the south; on the west it is bounded by the counties of Franklin, Hampshire, and Hampden; and on the east by Middlesex and Franklin. Worcester County contains fifty-seven towns, and one city,—Worcester. The soil is generally good; its surface is undulating and hilly; Wachusett Mountain is its highest elevation. The population of the county in 1860 was 159,650; in 1865 it was 162,923, being an increase in five years of 3,273. The population in 1870 was 192,718, being an increase since 1865 of 29,795. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $75,412,160; in 1865 it was $80,857,766, being an increase in five years of $5,445,606. According to the returns made by the selectmen of the towns and the mayor of Worcester in 1866, the whole number of men which the county furnished