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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Movement against Jackson-fall of Jackson-Intercepting the enemy-battle of Champion's Hill (search)
the city. McClernand was ordered to move one division of his command to Clinton, one division a few miles beyond Mississippi Springs following Sherman's line, and a third to Raymond. He was also directed to send his siege guns, four in number, with the troops going by Mississippi Springs. McClernand's position was an advantageous one in any event. With one division at Clinton he was in position to reinforce McPherson, at Jackson, rapidly if it became necessary; the division beyond MississMississippi Springs was equally available to reinforce Sherman; the one at Raymond could take either road. He still had two other divisions farther back, now that Blair had come up, available within a day at Jackson. If this last command should not be wacted the other near Champion's Hill; one (Carr's) had to pass over the same road with Osterhaus, but being back at Mississippi Springs, would not be detained by it; the fourth (Smith's) with Blair's division, was near Auburn with a different road to
despatches from General Pemberton to General Gregg, who had commanded the day before in the battle of Raymond. Sherman moved to a parallel position on the Mississippi Springs and Jackson road; McClernand moved to a point near Raymond. The next day Sherman and McPherson moved their entire forces toward Jackson. The rain fell id in the best of spirits, about fourteen miles, and engaged the enemy about twelve o'clock M., near Jackson. McClernand occupied Clinton with one division, Mississippi Springs with another, Raymond with a third, and had Blair's division of Sherman's corps, with a wagon train, still in the rear near New-Auburn, while McArthur, withond. Whilst there we heard that the enemy had met General McPherson near Raymond, and was defeated. Next morning we marched to Raymond, and passed on to Mississippi Springs, where we surprised a cavalry picket, capturing them, and on the following day, namely, May fourteenth, pushed on to Jackson by the lower road, McPherson's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
s ordered to move one division of his command to Clinton, one division a few miles beyond Mississippi Springs,--following Sherman's line,--and a third to Raymond. He was also directed to send his siege-guns, four in number, with the troops going by Mississippi Springs. McClernand's position was an advantageous one, in any event. With one division at Clinton, he was in position to reenforce McPherson at Jackson rapidly if it became necessary. The division beyond Mississippi Springs was equally available to reenforce Sherman. The one at Raymond could take either road. He still had two on was confronting a rebel battery which enfiladed the road on which he was marching — the Mississippi Springs road-and commanded a bridge spanning the stream over which he had to pass. By detaching 's Hill; one (Carr's) had to pass over the same road with Osterhaus's, but, being back at Mississippi Springs, would not be detained thereby; the fourth (Smith's, with Blair's division) was near Aubu
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
e menacing peril,, and instantly took measures for striking Pemberton before such junction should be effected. For this purpose he gave orders for a concentration of his forces in the direction of Edwards's Station, which was about two miles from the railway bridge over the Big Black River. McPherson was directed to retrace his steps to Clinton the next morning, May 15, 1863. and McClernand's scattered divisions One division of McClernand's troops was then in Clinton, another at Mississippi Springs, a third at Raymond, and a fourth, with Blair's division of Sherman's corps, with a wagon train between Raymond and Utica. were ordered to march simultaneously toward Bolton's Station and concentrate, while Sherman was directed to remain in Jackson only long enough to cause a thorough destruction of the railways, military factories, arsenal, bridges, a large cotton factory, stores, and other public property, and then to rejoin the main army. John C. Pemberton. Early on the morni
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
of Colonel Randal McGavock, Tenth Tennessee regiment, who fell gallantly in this action, was much regretted. He fell back to Jackson, in conformity to General Pemberton's instructions for such a case, accompanied by Walker, whom he met at Mississippi Springs. They reached the place with their brigades on the evening of the 13th. General Gregg, the senior of the two, reported to me on my arrival at night. See telegram to Secretary of War, Appendix. He informed me that he had learned from sen because its direction was more favorable than that of any other for effecting a junction with the Army of Mississippi. While Sherman's and McPherson's corps were moving upon Jackson, McClernand's divisions were ordered to Raymond, Mississippi Springs, and Clinton. From the events of the 14th, I supposed that General Grant intended to occupy Jackson aid hold it, to prevent the troops then there, and those coming from the East, from joining Lieutenant-General Pemberton's army. That
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
s corps and McPherson's were still ahead, and had fought the battle of Port Gibson, on the 11th. I overtook General Grant in person at Auburn, and he accompanied my corps all the way into Jackson, which we reached May 14th. McClernand's corps had been left in observation toward Edwards's Ferry. McPherson had fought at Raymond, and taken the left-hand road toward Jackson, via Clinton, while my troops were ordered by General Grant .n person to take the right-hand road leading through Mississippi Springs. We reached Jackson at the same time; McPherson fighting on the Clinton road, and my troops fighting just outside the town, on the Raymond road, where we captured three entire field-batteries, and about two hundred prisoners of war. The rebels, under General Joe Johnston, had retreated through the town northward on the Canton road. Generals Grant, McPherson, and I, met in the large hotel facing the State-House, where the former explained to us that he had intercepted dispatches from
ment, you moved on the north side of Fourteen Mile Creek toward Raymond. This delicate and hazardous movement was executed by a portion of your number, under cover of Hovey's division, which made a feint of attack in line of battle upon Edwards's Station. Too late to harm you, the enemy attacked the rear of that division, but was promptly and decisively repulsed. Resting near Raymond that night, on the morning of the fourteenth, you entered that place, one division moving on to Mississippi Springs, near Jackson, in support of General Sherman, another to Clinton, in support of General McPherson, a third remaining at Raymond, and a fourth at Old Auburn, to bring up the army trains. On the fifteenth you again led the advance toward Edwards's Station, which once more became the objective point. Expelling the enemy's picket from Bolton the same day, you seized and held that important position. On the sixteenth you led the advance, in three columns, upon three roads against Ed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
ey became engaged with General Adams's brigades. I was then ordered by General Jackson to move my command nearer to Clinton, which was done and held the position, until General Adams's command retired and took position at the tombstone, about one-and-a-half miles in my rear, when I was ordered by General Jackson to withdraw my command, and take position near the breast-works west of Jackson. Apprehending that the enemy might make a flank movement on the road leading from Clinton via Mississippi Springs to Jackson, I sent some scouts to ascertain if such was the case; they not reporting, I sent out a company from the Twenty-eighth, under Captain Ratcliff, who reported immediately, that they were advancing on that road in force, with infantry, cavalry and artillery, and were then nearer Jackson (the point we were falling back to) than the position held by our troops. I immediately sent a staff officer to inform General Jackson of the fact, and that I would withdraw my brigade and try
epartment, you moved on the north side of Fourteen-mile creek towards Raymond. This delicate and hazardous movement was executed by a portion of your numbers under cover of Hovey's division, which made a feint of attack, in line of battle, upon Edward's station. Too late to harm you, the enemy attacked the rear of that division, but was promptly and decisively repulsed. Resting near Raymond that night, on the morning of the 14th, you entered that place—one division moving on to Mississippi springs, near Jackson, in support of General Sherman, another to Clinton, in support of General McPherson—a third remaining at Raymond, and a fourth at Old Auburn, to bring up the army-trains. On the 15th, you again led the advance towards Edward's station, which once more became the objective point. Expelling the enemy's pickets from Bolton the same Day, you seized and held that important position. On the 16th, you led the advance in three columns upon three roads, against Edward's sta