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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 2 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Dec. 27.--A correspondent in Charleston says, Fight crops out everywhere, especially in the speech of youthful South Carolina; like New York Mose, he is literally spiling for lack of one. You might deservedly apostrophize him as John Willett did his son, With his hat cocked, with a fire-eating, bilina water-drinking, swaggering, military air, too, are you going to kill the wintner, sir? substituting for the last-named person the name of our sorely-tried parent, Uncle Sam. For information, I take up to-day's Courier, the oldest and most respectable of Charleston dailies, at random. I find in it a communication, over the expressive signature of Rifle, suggesting that one of the crack regiments of the North should charter a couple of steamboats and come on to Charleston, to the rescue of the forts; that the first shedding of fraternal blood may be precipitated in a manner congenial to the aspirations of youthful South Carolina! The same paper chronicles an application for five hu
of a braggart than a hero. He was, in the mean time, engaged in gathering his men with the avowed intention of attacking Captain Gere's force at daylight, and, if possible, of cutting it to pieces. His followers live in the farm-houses of Loudon, Clarke, and Jefferson counties, and are either rebel soldiers or Union citizens, as the case may require. He would ride up to a house, call Joe or Jake, and tell them that he wanted them at such an hour at the usual place; to go and tell Jim or Mose. Almost every farm turned out somebody in answer to his call, proving that these men, with the certified oath of. allegiance in their pockets, and with passes allowing them to come in and go out of our lines at will, are not only in sympathy with the enemy, but are themselves perjured rebels. When they arrived at Paris, Colonel Mosby dismounted and stepped Into the house where he had his headquarters, leaving his pistols in the holsters. The Lieutenant, with drawn revolver, watched the p
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
pen. Was the Master dead? The hideous suggestion changed the whole aspect of my thoughts. My heart began to beat, as my imagination conjured up unknown consequences of the outrage to authority; and I was in a mood to listen to the promptings of Mose that we should abscond. I assented to his proposal, but, first, I sent a boy to find out the condition of the Master, and was relieved to find that he was bathing his face. Mose and I instantly left the school, for the ostensible purpose of waMose and I instantly left the school, for the ostensible purpose of washing the blood from my face; but, as a fact, we climbed over the garden-wall and dropped into Conway's field, and thence hastened through the high corn in the Bodfari direction, as though pursued by bloodhounds. This, then, was the result of the folly and tyranny of Francis. Boys are curious creatures, innocent as angels, proud as princes, spirited as heroes, vain as peacocks, stubborn as donkeys, silly as colts, and emotional as girls. The budding reason is so young and tender that it is
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.6 (search)
y, arranged a table, and, from a new tin-loaf, cut out generous breadths, on which she dropped circles of black treacle, and pressed them into our hands. After piling other lavishly-buttered slices on a plate near by, the boiling water was poured over the tea, and not until she had seen us well engaged on her bounties did she slacken her haste. Then, bringing a high-backed chair between us, she laid one hand on the other in her lap, and exclaimed,-- Dear heart alive, how you have grown, Mose, my lad! It makes my heart thump to see you so beautiful and clever-looking. Are not you very clever now? And don't you know just everything, writing and ciphering, and all that, you know? But what is the matter, children? How is it you have come to Denbigh? Have you been sent on errands, or have you run away? Don't be bashful, but tell me truly. When Mose had related the incidents which brought about our sudden departure from St. Asaph, a look of anxiety came across her face. Then
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.11 (search)
frequently like a bull in a china-shop, was admitted by Armstrong to the mess because he was a neighbour, and full of jests. A Sibley tent, an improvement on the bell-tent, contained the whole of us comfortably. Dan Goree had brought his slave Mose, a faithful blackie, to wait upon him. The mess annexed his services as cook and tin-washer, and, in return, treated Dan with high consideration. Mose was remarkable for a cow-like propensity to kick backward, if we but pointed our fingers at himMose was remarkable for a cow-like propensity to kick backward, if we but pointed our fingers at him. Armstrong contributed to the general comfort a stylish canteen and the favour of his company; and the rest of us gave our services and means to make the social circle as pleasant as possible, which, as we were bright, smart, and alive, meant a great deal; for, if there were any fowls, butter, milk, honey, or other accessories to diet in our neighbourhood, they were sure to be obtained by some indefatigable member of the mess. I was too green in the forager's arts, at the beginning of the camp
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
0. Mason, Penny, 165, 169. Manyanga, 335. Marks, Mr., 489, 494. Matabele War, 454, 455. McKenna, Mr., 478. Melchet Court, 423, 428. Milligan, Colonel James A., 205. Milner, Sir, Alfred, on South Africa, 495. Milton, John, 526. Mind and soul, thoughts on, 521, 522. Mirambo, 257, 258. Mississippi River, 115-117, 125. Moon, Mountains of the, 371. Morris, Edward Joy, 223, 245. Morris, Maria, aunt of Stanley, 55, 57, 62-68. Morris, Tom, uncle of Stanley, 58-68. Mose, boyhood friend of Stanley, 34-40. Mtesa, 311-313, 317, 318, 405. Murchison, Sir, Roderick, 267, 282. My Early Travels and Adventures, 225, 245. Myers, F. W. H., quoted, 289. Napier, Sir, Robert, 229. National School at Brynford, 44, 47-51. Nelson, mate on board the Windermere, 70, 75, 76, 80. Nelson, Captain, 354, 383, 387, 390. New Orleans, Stanley's life at, 81-125; later visit to, 426, 427. New York, Stanley's impressions of, 425. New York Herald, Stanley become
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
e-ground and the cotton-field. A few can read print, and scratch their names; not many can do either; while only three or four can express their meaning in decent English words. Most of them are so poor and ignorant, so vain and shifty, that Kellogg dares not trust them in the streets and grog-shops. New Orleans, a gay and rattling town, is rich in drinking-bars and galling hells-places in which men like Pinchback serve apprenticeships. These bars and hells have dangerous fascinations for Mose and Pete, Negroes fresh from the cotton-fields, and eager to enjoy their freedom in a great metropolis. Spies bring in news to the State House, that clever and unscrupulous men are dealing with the Negro senators. Cousins, the Negro member for St. Tammany, is said to have been kidnapped — in the street and carried to a distant part. His vote is lost-a set-off to the one false Conservative. Other Negroes are said to be spending their dollars and getting drunk. Kellogg perceives that he
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 8: battles of Chancellorsville, Thoroughfare Gap and Gettysburg.--wounded at Gettysburg and ordered home. (search)
d camp. We had not slept an hour since May 2, and were completely tired out. I slept all night and awoke thinking it was time for breakfast and found it was three P. M. We moved our camp to a delightful spot on the top of the hill, resumed our daily drills, and were once more under strict discipline. It was very hard to get leave of absence, but Lieutenant Shackley made application, giving as a reason that he required an officer's uniform, having just been promoted, and it was granted. Mose was absent ten days, and then returned, having purchased two pairs of stockings, a linen duster and a brush broom, but he had enjoyed his vacation, and had two cents left of his two months pay. June 16, marching orders came; we waited until all had moved, then with two pieces of the 1st Rhode Island artillery took our place in the rear. Two companies were ordered to march half a mile in the rear of the column, and Major Rice was placed in command of this detachment. We marched over groun
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
but there is a reality about the scenes in the dives and streets that points forward rather than backward. Baker continued in New York as it is (1848) to exploit Mose, and the interest in that form of play was capitalized immediately by other writers and actors. Philadelphia as it is appeared in 1849, and in Boston George CampbThe poor of New York (1857), Life in Brooklyn, its lights and Shades, its virtues and vices (1858) illustrate the nature of the species perhaps sufficiently, while Mose in California (1849) and Mose in China (1850) show how cosmopolitan that gentleman became. Much more important from the artistic standpoint were the comedies prMose in China (1850) show how cosmopolitan that gentleman became. Much more important from the artistic standpoint were the comedies proceeding by means of social satire. Here, too, we turn back to our first comedy, The contrast, for the beginning of the type, but while we note in 1841 the production of a cutting satire upon fashionable life Ireland, vol. II, p. 378. in the comedy of Saratoga springs, which was very successful, it was not until the producti
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
voyage, etc., A, 9 Morals of Chess, the, 101 More, Henry, 70 n. Morris, Colonel G. P., 241, 279 Morris, William, 261 Morse, Jedidiah, 187 Morse, S. F. B., 301 Morton, Nathaniel, 20, 22, 23, 27 Morton, Sarah Wentworth, 178, 285 Mose in California, 229 Mose in China, 229 Mourt's Relation, 19 Mowatt, Anna Ogden, 223, 229, 230 Murray, John, 249, 252, 255, 321 Murray, Mrs., Judith, 233 Murray, Lindley, 292 Muscle Seatoniance, 263 n. Musings (Dana), 240 MystMose in China, 229 Mourt's Relation, 19 Mowatt, Anna Ogden, 223, 229, 230 Murray, John, 249, 252, 255, 321 Murray, Mrs., Judith, 233 Murray, Lindley, 292 Muscle Seatoniance, 263 n. Musings (Dana), 240 Mystery of flowers, the, 267 n. N Nadowessiers Todtenlied, 212 Napoleon, 170, 185, 211 Narrative of surprising Conversions, 61 Narrative of the troubles with the Indians of New England, 25 Nathan Hale, 167 Nation, the, 216 n., 262 n., 289 n. Nativity, 265 Nature, 328, 334, 346, 352, 358 Neal, John, 208, 292, 307, 308, 309-310 Ned Myers, 302 Neidig, W. J., 216 n. Neighbour, 233 Neill, Rev. Edward D., 18 n. Nelson, Admiral, 246 New American magazine, the, 123
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