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Chapter 19: Mr. Sumner's House at Washington. his love of art. last Sickness and death. obsequies at Washington. meeting of the General Court. meeting at Faneuil Hall. remarks of J. B. Smith. remains at the Doric Hall. services at King's Chapel. at Mount Auburn. personal Appearance of Mr. Sumner. religious Views. his works. his style. his integrity. his consistency. his statesmanship and learning. his fame. In the long roll of martyrs in the cause of liberty, the name of Charles Sumner shall stand conspicuous, as worthy of the applause and reverence of manhood.--William L. Garrison. The dear and noble Sumner! My heart is too full for words; and in deepest sympathy of sorrow I reach out my hands to thee, who loved him so well. He has died as he wished to, at his post of duty, and when the heart of his beloved Massachusetts was turned toward him with more than the old-time love and reverence. God's peace be with him!--John G. Whittier. He had
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
laying of the funeral march of Mendelssohn as the assemblage moved slowly from the church. Of the grand procession to Mount Auburn, the Daily Globe said: The absence of any great military or civic display would have impressed an intelligent for were these funeral services, and when the tolling bells throughout the city heralded the passage of the procession to Mount Auburn, there was a sad significance suggested by the places through which it passed. By the fairest and the stateliest abodial love, may well have sighed as all that was mortal of her favorite son passed by her to the tomb. In the shades of Mount Auburn, he sleeps well; his earthly work all done, his memory a precious legacy to the people of the city of his birth, to the wished to have placed on the Senator's coffin previously to burial. The order was tenderly executed at the grave in Mount Auburn. Rev. Henry W. Foote pronounced the words, I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write:— From henceforth ble
lowed, and the services closed with the playing of the funeral march of Mendelssohn as the assemblage moved slowly from the church. Of the grand procession to Mount Auburn, the Daily Globe said: The absence of any great military or civic display would have impressed an intelligent foreigner as a strange thing in a funeral ce. Fitting in their impressive simplicity were these funeral services, and when the tolling bells throughout the city heralded the passage of the procession to Mount Auburn, there was a sad significance suggested by the places through which it passed. By the fairest and the stateliest abodes of the city of his birth, whose socialom he had a scholar's affection and a filial love, may well have sighed as all that was mortal of her favorite son passed by her to the tomb. In the shades of Mount Auburn, he sleeps well; his earthly work all done, his memory a precious legacy to the people of the city of his birth, to the State, the nation and the world, and h
he enclosure, stepped forward and placed upon the coffin, already laden with floral tributes of rarest beauty, an exquisite wreath, and a cross. A request was received from Mrs. Hastings, Mr. Sumner's sister in San Francisco, asking Miss Maud Howe, daughter of Dr. S. G. Howe, to have prepared for her a wreath and cross, the description of which was fully given, which she wished to have placed on the Senator's coffin previously to burial. The order was tenderly executed at the grave in Mount Auburn. Rev. Henry W. Foote pronounced the words, I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write:— From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for so saith the Spirit. They have rested from their labors, and their works do follow them. And as the dust began to fall upon all there was mortal left of the great sleeper, the bereaved multitude slowly left the City of the Dead. The ashes of the Statesman had at last found their congenial resting-place, by the side of those of
May, Rev. Samuel, Jr., letter to, about anti-slavery excitement, 144, 145; and fugitive slaves, 152. Medici, Marchesa Peruzzi de, daughter of Story, visit to, 355-57. Michigan University, influence of Higginson's writings on, 157. Miller, Joaquin, 336. Monarch of Dreams, 417, 423; account of, 311. 312. Montgomery, Capt., James, leader of rescue party, 197, 198, 200; plan to recall, 203. Moore, Thomas, visits to birthplace of, 322. Mott, Lucretia, described, 135, 136. Mount Auburn, early, 18, 21, 22. Muller, Max, account of, 328. Munthe, Dr., 354. My Outdoor Study, 157, 408. Negroes, Higginson's early interest in, 17, 38; Underground Railroad, 151-54; St. Louis slave market described, 182-89; regiment of freed, 216-51; discipline in, 217, 218, 226, 227; sayings of, 219, 220, 227, 230, 237, 245, 246; barbecue, 235: religious differences described, 244; description of, 246-48; Question of, in Newport, 253, 254; Higginson's address to, at Alabama, 366; at Bo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
and gazed on the memorials raised to genius, virtue, and merit. . . . You may ask then how Pere La Chaise compares with Mt. Auburn. I can answer easily. There is an interest which Pere La Chaise possesses which Mt. Auburn has not yet acquired, and Mt. Auburn has not yet acquired, and I hope long years will pass away before it can assume this melancholy crown. Everywhere, in the former, you see the memorial which marks the resting-place of some man whose very name causes the blood to course quickly through the veins. Your eyes r of Laplace. . . . And yet, as a place of mourning to be visited by the pious steps of friends and kindred, give me our Mt. Auburn, clad in the russet dress of Nature, with its simple memorials scattered here and there, its beautiful paths and its overshadowing groves. Nature has done as much for Mt. Auburn as man has for Pere La Chaise, and I need not tell you how superior is the workmanship of Nature. In the French graveyards there is an actual surfeit of gravestones; the sense is fatigued b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
o learn the language as I wished. Another six months would make me master of it and of its literature . . . . Ever affectionately yours, Charles. To his brother George, Munich. Washington's Headquarters, Cambridge, Sunday, May 9, 1841. dear George,—Once again from the headquarters of our great chief. Since I last wrote you, Mrs. Craigie, the widow of the builder of Craigie's Bridge and the owner of this house, has died and been removed from its spacious rooms to a narrow bed at Mt. Auburn. It is a lovely day, and from the open window I look across the lawn and the winding Charles to Brighton and the hills that enclose Brookline. Our sky is Italian; as bright and clear as that which looks down upon Naples. It is from English travellers, who have never seen the sun in their own country, that we imbibe the idea of the superlative brightness and clearness of the Italian sky . . . . Ever yours, Charles. To Dr. Lieber, he wrote, May 12, 1841:— I knew Warburton sligh
History of Mount Auburn. The celebrity attained by Mount Auburn, pronounced by European travellers the most beautiful Cemetery in existeMount Auburn, pronounced by European travellers the most beautiful Cemetery in existence, and which, perhaps, without assuming too much, may be called the Pere la Chaise of America,--the extraordinary natural loveliness of the it is probably a result of the formation of the establishment at Mount Auburn itself. Something more and better than the mere love of noveltycontinually made from these parties, for information relating to Mount Auburn. The multitudes of foreigners and other strangers, who frequent adoption of measures for the foundation of the establishment at Mount Auburn, are such as are already familiar, we must presume, to such of otee was appointed to procure an accurate topographical survey of Mount Auburn, and report a plan for laying it out into lots. This service wain every heart, and pervaded the whole scene. Some account of Mount Auburn itself, as it existed at this stage of its history, may with pro
aple to Maple. Laurel Avenue leads from Walnut to Walnut. Locust Avenue leads from Beech to Poplar. Magnolia Avenue leads from Mountain to Maple. Maple Avenue leads from Larch to Garden. Mountain Avenue leads from Chestnut round Mount Auburn. Oak Avenue leads from Magnolia to Willow. Pine Avenue leads from Cypress to Central. Poplar Avenue leads from Central to Chestnut. Spruce Avenue leads from Pine to Walnut. Walnut Avenue leads from Central to Mountain. Willowo Spruce. Sedge Path leads from Fir to Heath. Trefoil Path leads from Spruce to Orange. Tulip Path leads from Trefoil to Walnut. Thistle Path leads from Spruce to Cowslip. Violet Path leads from Walnut avenue to Ivy path. Vine Path leads from Moss path to Iris path. Woodbine Path leads from Hawthorn path round Cedar hill. Yarrow Path leads from Greenbrier to Fir. Hills. Cedar hill, Pine hill, Laurel hill. Mount Auburn, Harvard hill, Temple hill, Juniper hill.
se. The Legislature of this Commonwealth, with a parental foresight has clothed the Horticultural Society with authority (if I may use its own language) to make a perpetual dedication of it, as a Rural Cemetery or Burying-Ground, and to plant and embellish it with shrubbery, and flowers, and trees, and walks, and other rural ornaments. And I stand here by the order and in behalf of this Society, to declare that, by these services, it is to be deemed henceforth and forever so dedicated. Mount Auburn, in the noblest sense, belongs no longer to the living, but to the dead. It is a sacred, it is an eternal trust. It is consecrated ground. May it remain forever inviolate! What a multitude of thoughts crowd upon the mind in the contemplation of such a scene. How much of the future, even in its far distant reaches, rises before us with all its persuasive realities. Take but one little narrow space of time, and how affecting are its associations! Within the flight of one half centu
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