Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Nassau River (Florida, United States) or search for Nassau River (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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"Steamer Day" in Nassua. --The Nassau correspondent of the Charleston Courier gives a lively sketch of affairs at the famed stopping place of the blockade runners, a portion of which we copy: Here in Nassau we are all bustle and business.Nassau we are all bustle and business.--The mammoth hotel is crowded to overflowing. The last New York steamer brought a fresh load of Northern invalids and pleasure- seekers. From the South and England there is a constant influx of business men. Charleston faces are getting quite familiar on the streets. With our Southern people in Nassau decidedly the most interesting event of a day is the arrival of a steamer from home. When the proper announcement is made from the signal stations on the hills, at the book of the town, it is the opening of which is attended with feverish impatience, and followed by smiles or growls, satisfaction or dejection as prizes or blanks are drawn in the postal lottery.--together a steamer day among the rebels in Nassau is a decided sensation.
Another steamer from Nassau. Wilmington, March 19. --An English Iron steamer arrived at a Confederate port this morning having left Nassau on Saturday last at 3 P. M. All the steamers from this port had arrived cut except the Douro. It is said the was captured by the Quaker City. Another steamer from Nassau. Wilmington, March 19. --An English Iron steamer arrived at a Confederate port this morning having left Nassau on Saturday last at 3 P. M. All the steamers from this port had arrived cut except the Douro. It is said the was captured by the Quaker City.
Another steamer in. Charleston, March 18. --The steamship Calypso arrived from Nassau this morning. She was charred last night by the blockaders, who fired repeatedly. One shell burst over her deck, hurting nobody.
rd and attachment of the men he leads. The proper place for General McClellan is, of course, at the head of the whole army; but as the Government has a right to command his services in any sphere it thinks fit, it would have shown more wisdom in sending him to the Valley of the Mississippi than it has in compelling him to stand idle awaiting orders in New York. Party malignity should not thus jeopard the success of a great military enterprise. The Feeling in the United States. The Nassau correspondent of the Charleston Courier writes, March 18th, as follows: We may as well make up our minds that the war will drag along until next fall or winter. --Foreign intervention will only intensify. My reading of Northern papers leads me to believe that the mass of the Northern people are indisposed to let the South go without other attempts to subdue it. The Democrats are only conditional peace men. John Van Baren advocates the conquest of the South first, and then if she is no