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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
ving some protection to the troops on both sides. There was also considerable underbrush. A number of attempts were made by the enemy to turn our right flank, where Sherman was posted, but every effort was repulsed with heavy loss. But the front attack was kept up so vigorously that, to prevent the success of these attempts to get on our flanks, the National troops were compelled several times to take positions to the rear, nearer Pittsburg Landing. When the firing ceased at night, the National line was all of a mile in rear of the position it had occupied in the morning. In one of the backward moves, on the 6th, the division commanded by General Prentiss did not fall back with the others. This left his flanks exposed, and enabled the enemy to capture him, with about 2200 of his officers and men. General Badeau gives 4 o'clock of the 6th as about the time this capture took place. He may be right as to the time, but my recollection is that the hour was later. General Prentis
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The Army at Pittsburg landing-injured by a fall --the Confederate attack at Shiloh-the first day's fight at Shiloh-General Sherman-condition of the Army-close of the first day's fight --the second day's fight-retreat and defeat of the Confederates (search)
iving some protection to the troops on both sides. There was also considerable underbrush. A number of attempts were made by the enemy to turn our right flank, where Sherman was posted, but every effort was repulsed with heavy loss. But the front attack was kept up so vigorously that, to prevent the success of these attempts to get on our flanks, the National troops were compelled, several times, to take positions to the rear nearer Pittsburg landing. When the firing ceased at night the National line was all of a mile in rear of the position it had occupied in the morning. In one of the backward moves, on the 6th, the division commanded by General Prentiss did not fall back with the others. This left his flanks exposed and enabled the enemy to capture him with about 2,200 of his officers and men. General Badeau gives four o'clock of the 6th as about the time this capture took place. He may be right as to the time, but my recollection is that the hour was later. General Prent
General Geo. H. Thomas, and the rebel forces, commanded by General F. K. Zollicoffer, resulting in the utter rout and defeat of the rebels. The Confederates commenced the attack at half-past 5 in the morning. The fight lasted till late in the afternoon, when the rebels were driven off the field in great confusion, their leader, General Zollicoffer, being among the slain. On reaching their entrenchments, a few miles distant from the scene of action, they were cannonaded until dark, by the National batteries, and during the night succeeded in making good their escape across the Cumberland River. About one hundred and fifty rebel prisoners were taken, and ten guns, about one hundred wagons, upwards of twelve hundred horses and mules, large quantities of small arms, with subsistence and hospital stores captured. Besides these a large number of flags were taken on the field of battle, and in the deserted entrenchments.--(Doc. 16.) This evening the United States gunboat Itasca capt
February 15. The National batteries at Venus Point, on the Savannah River, were attacked at three o'clock this afternoon, by four rebel gunboats, with a view of effecting a passage from Fort Pulaski for the rebel steamers then at that place. After an engagement of one hour the rebels were driven off; the flag-officer's boat being disabled and taken in tow and the steamer that attempted the passage of the river returning to Fort Pulaski. The guns were manned by the Third Rhode Island detachment, under Capt. Gould, and effectively worked. There was no loss on the National side.--Brig-Gen. Viele's Report. The Ninth battery of Rhode Island Artillery, under the command of Lieut. Wightman, passed through New York, en route for Port Royal, S. C.--N. Y. Times, February 16. The President, through the Secretaries of War and the Navy, returned thanks to Brig.-Gen. Burnside and Flag-Officer Goldsborough, and to Brig.-Gen. Grant and Flag-Officer Foote, and the land and naval for
rrival by letter to the Adjutant-General of the army.--Lieutenant Earl and thirty men, belonging to the Fourth Wisconsin cavalry, captured a party of rebel guerrillas and cavalrymen, in the neighborhood of the junction of the Amite and Comite Rivers, La., and safely conducted them into Baton Rouge. Among the prisoners were Colonel Hunter (Ten-Mile Bob) and Captain Penny, the leaders in the raids and attacks on the river steamboats in that vicinity.--Fort Sumter, S. C., was bombarded by the National batteries on Morris Island.--Mr.----Spence, of London, England, ceased to be the financial agent of the rebel government.--Richmond Dispatch, Sept. 29. An engagement took place at McMinnville, Tenn., in which the rebels were repulsed with a loss of a large number of prisoners.--the rebel steamer Herald was captured by the gunboat Kearny, and carried into Key West, Fla.--Major-General Grant, from his headquarters at Vicksburgh, issued Special Orders authorizing the issuing of rations to
January 7. Madisonville, La., was entered and occupied by the National forces.--Twenty shells were thrown into the city of Charleston, S. C., from the National batteries under the command of General Gillmore.--Caleb B. Smith, Judge of the United States Court for the District of Indiana, and late Secretary of the Interior, died suddenly at Indianapolis.--the rebel schooner John Scott, while attempting to escape from the harbor of Mobile, Ala., was captured by the Union gunboat Kennebec.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
12th, shortly after noon, to Frederick City, being the first to enter that place, and driving out the Confederate rear-guard of cavalry under General Wade Hampton. The insignificant skirmish which occurred there had a considerable influence upon the battle of the 14th, in an indirect way. The enemy's cavalry had been driven from the banks of the Monocacy River and retired into the town. The division, consisting of two brigades (Moor's and Scammon's), had crossed at the stone bridge on the National road, and Moor's, deployed on both sides of the turn-pike, advanced upon the city. Colonel Moor himself, with a troop of cavalry and a single cannon, was in the road. An impertinent criticism upon the speed of his movement, volunteered by a young staff-officer from corps headquarters, stung Moor into dashing ahead at a gallop, with his escort and staff, and the gun. Just at the outskirts of the town the road turns to the left among the houses, and cannot be seen. While we were wondering
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
en deceived by this stratagem. In this case the Confederates came, having an appearance exactly like Sigel's men, and the battery with which they announced their true character was composed of Sigel's captured guns! Their voice was the signal for a renewal of the conflict, and they were speedily silenced by Dubois, supported by Osterhaus and a remnant of the First Missouri. The battle raged fiercely for a time. Totten's Battery, supported by Iowa and Regular troops, in the center of the National line, was the special object of attack. The two armies were sometimes within a few feet of each other, and faces were scorched by the flash of a foeman's gun. The Union column stood like a rock in the midst of turbulent waves, dashing them into foam. Its opponents were vastly its superior in numbers. At length its line, pressed by an enormous weight, began to bend. At that critical moment Captain Granger dashed forward from the rear with the support of Dubois's Battery, consisting of po
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
s, and eighteen horses. Schwartz had lost half of his guns and sixteen horses; and McAllister had lost half of his 24-pound howitzers. many of his officers were wounded, and a large number of his men lay dead or mutilated on the field. The division fell slowly back, fighting gallantly, and by eleven o'clock it was in a line with Hurlbut's, that covered Pittsburg Landing. We have alluded to the perilous position of the brigade of Stuart, of Sherman's division, on the extreme left of the National line, David L. Stuart was a resident of Chicago, and was then, as colonel of a regiment from Illinois, acting brigadier-general, in command of a brigade composed of the Fifty-fifth Illinois, and Fifty-fourth (Zouaves) and Seventy-first Ohio regiments. to whose assistance General W. H. L. Wallace sent McArthur. It was posted about two miles from Pittsburg Landing on the Hamburg road, near the crossing of Lick Creek. Its position was isolated, and could be easily reached by the foe by a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
s, Cobb's, and Phillips's, all Georgians; General Humphreys's brigade of Mississippians, and a brigade composed of the remains of Anderson's and Bryant's, consisting of South Carolina and Georgia regiments. The leader of the Mississippi troops was the present (1868) Governor Humphreys, of Mississippi. These were picked men, the flower of Longstreet's army; and, in obedience to orders, one brigade pressed forward to the close assault, two brigades supporting it, while two others watched the National line, and kept up a continual fire. The tumult was awful for a few minutes, for it was composed of the yells of voices, the rattle of musketry, the thunder of cannon, and the screams of shells. The charging party moved swiftly forward to the abatis, which somewhat confused their line. The wire network was a worse obstacle, and whole companies were prostrated by it. While they were thus bewildered, the double-shotted guns of General Ferrero, the skillful commander of the fort, were playin
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