Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for New Inlet (North Carolina, United States) or search for New Inlet (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
s armed was rendered useless by the muzzle being broken off. On the night of May 7, 1864, an armor-plated vessel, known as the ram North Carolina, came out of New Inlet at the mouth of Wilmington liver, and exchanged shots with the steamers Mount Vernon, Kansas, Howqua, Nansemond, and Britannia. She did no serious damage to anyembarrassed by a sailing vessel. On the 10th of December Rear-Admiral Porter issued a General Order with chart plan of the proposed attack on the batteries at New Inlet. He says: It is first proposed to endeavor to paralyze the garrison by an explosion, all the vessels remaining twelve miles out from the bar, and the troops in reverse as before. It is not desirable that the vessels should be seen by the enemy prior to the time of attack. A rendezvous, twenty-five miles east of New Inlet, is given. Commanders of divisions will get their divisions in line and keep them so. When signal is made to form line of battle, every vessel will take her pos
n fact surprisingly little injury had been inflicted upon it, save through the bursting of rifled guns. On December 29th the Secretary of the Navy, in a letter to Lieutenant-General Grant, said: Ships can approach nearer the enemy's works at New Inlet than was anticipated. Their fire can keep the enemy away from their guns. A landing can easily be effected upon the beach north of Fort Fisher, not only of troops, but all their supplies and artillery. This force can have its flanks protecte it evidently was, as seen from the fleet. No reflection is intended on the defenders of the fort, who certainly in the second attack exhibited throughout the utmost pertinacity and courage. The morning following the fall of the defences of New Inlet, as soon as a channel could be found and buoyed, the light-draught gunboats were taken over the outer bar as fast as possible, and as there is a shoaler one within, similar to the bulkhead at Hatteras Inlet, it was only on the forenoon of the 2