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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
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y strong — not fortified as carefully as Charleston, but still well suited to the narrow water-courses by which vessels approach. I cannot conceive, however, that any thing here could check a veteran army like that of General Sherman. If he has any trouble, it will be from the force gathering on his footsteps. His best base would be from this to the Stono, having no less than four fine estuaries to connect with the squadron, namely, Broad River, the rivers emptying into St. Helena, North-Edisto, and Stono, giving him ample means of supply, conveniently distributed, with the flank of Charleston at one hand and that of Savannah on the other, with the choice of falling on either. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Port Royal Harbor, Dec. 12, 1864. Telegram. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: I have just received a communication from Sherman's army. It is a few miles from
l, 1862, for the rest of the month it appeared impossible to effect any thing against the enemy with the few troops then available in this district, stretching along nearly two hundred miles of coast, from St. Augustine, Florida, to North-Edisto River, South-Carolina. These troops did not consist of more than about fifteen thousand effective men. At the close of April, the barge crew of General Ripley escaped from Charleston and were brought to Port Royal. They represented the troops and or attacking that city, which was at once informally laid before General Hunter, Commodore Du Pont, and others, and appeared to meet their cordial concurrence. This plan was to add to the force of some three thousand five hundred men, then at North-Edisto, by a well-concerted and simultaneous movement of our steamers, all the other disposable force in the district, to make some ten thousand in all; and by rapidly ferrying them across the North-Edisto River, to John's and Wadnelow Island, to mar
. The accumulation of the enemy's troops, transports, and iron-clad vessels at Port Royal, during the months of February and March, and subsequently, in the North Edisto and Stono Rivers, having convinced me that the long threatened attack on Charleston was immediately impending, every possible precaution was at once made for tt and K. Kemper, First South Carolina artillery. The enemy's land forces, collected in considerable strength on Seabrook Island, and in the transports in North Edisto River, and on Folly, Coles, and other islands about the mouth of the Stono River inlet, made no attempt to co-operate actively with the naval attack. In conclu Jordan, Chief of Staff, Dep't of S. C., Ga., and Fla.: General: Upon the first instant the increase of the enemy's force in the Stono, and information from North Edisto, gave warning that the long threatened combined movement upon Charleston was about to take place. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist, commanding First subdivision o
. Its northern extremity extends to within a few miles of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. The main road from Port Royal to Pocotaligo crosses the channel at this point. The evacuation of Hilton Head, on the southwestern extremity of Beaufort Island, followed the capture of Port Royal. This exposed Savannah, only about twentyfive miles distant, to an attack from that direction. At the same time, the Federals having command of Helena Bay, Charleston was liable to be assailed from North Edisto or Stono Inlet, and the railroad could have been reached without opposition by the route from Port Royal to Pocotaligo. Such was the state of affairs when General Lee reached Charleston, about December 1, 1861, to assume the command of the Department of North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. His vigorous mind at once comprehended the situation, and, with his accustomed energy, he met the difficulties that presented themselves. Directing fortifications to be constructed on the Stono an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
e Savannah River, from which Fort Pulaski, which was within easy mortar distance, might be assailed, and the harbor of Savannah perfectly sealed against blockade runners. On the approach of the National gunboats the defences were abandoned, and on Nov. 25, Dupont wrote to the Secretary of War: The flag of the United States is flying over the territory of Georgia. Before the close of the year the National authority was supreme from Warsaw Sound, below the mouth of the Savannah, to the North Edisto River, below Charleston. Every fort on the islands of that region had been abandoned, and there was nothing to make serious opposition to National authority. When the National forces reached those sea islands along the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia, there was a vast quantity of valuable sea-island cotton, gathered and ungathered, upon them. When the first panic was over the Confederates returned, stealthily, and applied the torch to millions of dollars' worth of this staple. On
he work, that I did not consider 10-inch columbiads essential to the defence of the position, for which siege-guns, musketry, stout arms and hearts, and the strength of sand parapets must be relied on. Orders were issued, however, for the remounting of the 10-inch gun, if practicable. The enemy's fleet this morning consisted of four monitors, the Ironsides, and seventeen vessels inside the bar, fourteen vessels outside, and thirty vessels in Folly River. One gunboat and four vessels in North Edisto, and one steam-frigate, one sloop-of-war, one gunboat, and thirty-four transports at Hilton Head. Brigadier-General Ripley was instructed this day to have the guns intended for the Legare Point Battery mounted immediately, and to open fire with them as soon as possible. Brigadier-General Mercer was telegraphed to send on, if practicable, another 10-inch columbiad from the Savannah works. At 2 P. M. a shell from the enemy's batteries struck Fort Sumter, and some eight or ten 30-po
e so long as the enemy's six ironclads remain in North Edisto; for they no doubt intend, if not to attack Chars of February and March, and subsequently in the North Edisto and Stono rivers, having convinced me that the l on Seabrook Island, and in the transports in North Edisto River, and on Folly, Cole's, and other islands abouaval expedition against the enemy's ironclads in North Edisto, as originally ordered. Respectfully, your ob about a brigade of 2000 men on Seabrook Island, North Edisto. Nothing is positively known of the enemy's lanrom the apparent number of troops and vessels in North Edisto, about the 10th July last, was it not possible f Ashley, and all the country to the east bank of North Edisto, from mouth to Graham's Ferry. 7th James Islabridge. Stevenson has concentrated his force on North Edisto to oppose him. Wheeler telegraphs that General A Ashepoo across Edisto, and enemy having crossed North Edisto near Orangeburg, McLaws is retiring from Branchv
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, South Carolina, 1865 (search)
d 8th Cavalry. KENTUCKY--3d and 5th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--9th Cavalry. OHIO--5th, 9th and 10th Cavalry; McLaughlin's Squadron Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--9th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--10th Battery Light Arty.; Dismounted Brigade. Feb. 12-13: Skirmishes, North Edisto RiverILLINOIS--111th Infantry. INDIANA--83d Infantry. NEW YORK--60th Infantry. OHIO--5th, 29th, 37th, 47th, 53d, 54th and 66th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--28th and 147th Infantry. Feb. 14: Skirmish, Wolf's PlantationSkirmishers 1st Div. 15th Corps. Feb. 14: Skirmish, Gunter's Bridge, North Edisto RiverWISCONSIN--10th Battery Light Arty.; Dismounted Brigade. Feb. 15: Skirmish, Congaree CreekILLINOIS--Battery "H," 1st Light Arty.; 26th, 40th and 103d Infantry. INDIANA--12th, 97th and 100th Infantry. IOWA--4th, 6th, 9th, 25th, 26th, 30th and 31st Infantry. MICHIGAN--Battery "B," 1st Light Arty. MISSOURI--27th, 31st and 32d Infantry. OHIO--46th and 76th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--28th and 147th Infantry. WISCONSIN--12th Battery Light Arty. Feb
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
Edisto River, February 9. Orangeburg, North Edisto River, February 11-12. Columbia February 15Edisto River, February 9. Orangeburg, North Edisto River, February 11-12. Columbia February 15 2. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15--5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Congaree Creek FebruaEdisto River, February 9. Orangeburg, North Edisto River, February 11-12. Columbia February 15 2. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15--5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15-idge, South Edisto River, February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Congaree Creek Februa-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Congaree Creek Februa-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Columbia February 16-[20 more...]
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
Salkehatchie Swamp February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Congaree Creek February 15. Columbia February 16-17ary to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamps, S. C., February 2-5, 1865. North Edisto River February 12-13. Columbia February 16-17. West's Cross Roads Februardge, Salkehatchie River, February 3. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Columbia February 16-17. Fayetteville, N. C., Marchehatchie Swamp, S. C., February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N. hatchie Swamps, S. C., February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 12-13. South River February 15. Columbia February 16-17. , South Edisto River, S. C., February 8. Orangeburg February 11-12. North Edisto River February 12-13. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N.
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