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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 110 0 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
erve the whole as one. She believed firmly in maintaining the privacy of club life. The club is a larger home, she said, and we wish to have the immunities and defences of home; therefore we do not wish the public present, even by its attorney, the reporter. The three following years were important ones to the Howe family. Lawton's Valley was sold, to our great and lasting grief: and — after a summer spent at Stevens Cottage near Newport — the Doctor bought the place now known as Oak Glen, scarce half a mile from the Valley; a place to become only less dear to the family. No. 19 Boylston Place was also sold, and he bought No. 32 Mount Vernon Street, a sunny, pleasant house whose spacious rooms and tall windows recalled the Chestnut Street house, always regretted. Here life circled ever faster and faster, fuller and fuller. Our father, though beginning to feel the weight of years, had not yet begun to take in sail, but continued to pile labor on labor, adding the new whi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
e this she had preached her last sermon in London. The Journal says: All Sunday at work upon my sermon, the last in London. Neither height nor depth, nor any other creature. The sermon of high and low, and the great unity beyond all dimensions. A good and to me a most happy delivery of opinions and faith which I deeply hold.... So ended my happy ministration in London, begun in fear and anxiety, ended in certainty and renewed faith, which God continue to me. August found her back at Oak Glen, exhausted in body and mind. She is almost too tired to write in the Journal, and such entries as there are only accentuate her fatigue. I am here at my table with books and papers, but feel very languid. My arms feel as if there were no marrow in their bones. I suppose this is reaction after so much work, but unless I can get up strength somehow I shall not accomplish anything. Weakness in all my limbs. Have had my Greek lesson and begun to read the Maccabees and the Apocrypha. I
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 16: the last of Green Peace 1872-1876; aet. 53-57 (search)
d came to occupy the old. Here the first grandchild (Alice Maud Richards) was born; here and at Oak Glen the next four years were mainly passed. The Doctor's ardent spirit longed for new fields of re the summer delight of the grandparents, as they and their mother usually spent the summer at Oak Glen. Friday, September 13. Before I open even my New Testament to-day, I must make record of theconverts evil into good, and without which all good degenerates into evil. July finds her at Oak Glen. She is full of texts and sermons, but makes time to write to Fanny Perkins, Mrs. Charles Cto strike up at a moment's notice. There was much coming and going of young men and maidens at Oak Glen in those days, and much singing of popular songs of a melancholy or desperate cast. The maiden in the summer to see the old people at the Town Farm, a pleasant, gray old house, not far from Oak Glen. In the afternoon visited the poorhouse with J. and F. and found several of the old people a
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
W. H. July, 1879, found our mother at home at Oak Glen, unpacking trunks and reading a book on the Talmudand they became an important factor in the life at Oak Glen. All through the records of these summer days runppear from them, she never had enough. To Laura Oak Glen, October 10, 1880. Dearest, dearest L. E. R., Hus accident, whose effects she felt all her life. Oak Glen, November 9, 1880. Dearest Laura Child, Beholdfainted with delight and astonishment. June 20, Oak Glen. Dear Flossy suffering at 6 A. M. -about all day. s. To Laura (who, as usual, wanted a letter) Oak Glen, July 10, 1881. Yes, she was a little injured, of Horatius at the bridge, in the green parlor at Oak Glen, with the following cast:-- HoratiusF. Marion Cter Uncle Sam brought him to spend a day or two at Oak Glen, where the household was thrown into a flutter by noble poem, The Ode to Albion, under the trees of Oak Glen, and told endless stories of Swinburne, Whistler,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
hands, from which he has been reading passages. It sounds strange and silly ... To the same Oak Glen, May 10, 1883. ...--I have been here alone all these days, with many gentle ghosts of past c angle where you and I used to sit, last summer, and enjoyed a bath of sunshine.... To Laura Oak Glen, August 21, 1883. My much neglected darling, I give you to-day my first hour, or half-hour, y in whose renewed prosperity she must henceforth feel a deep and lasting interest. To Laura Oak Glen, July 19, 1885. How I left New Orleans, how I came North, how I let myself down here, is no he city where she had enjoyed and suffered so much, and the friends she made there. To Laura Oak Glen, November 4, 1885. You little hateful thing! Herewith returned is the letter you wrote for. ave read it. Sweetison (a new little 'spression which I have this minute invented), I stayed at Oak Glen until Monday last, which was the 21st. Then I came here by the way of Boston, and arrove on Tu
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
wrote to Mrs. Cheney, who had lost her only daughter: This combat of the soul with deadly sorrow is a single-handed one, so far as human help is concerned. I do believe that God's sweet angels are with us when we contend against the extreme of calamity. Heavy as this affliction was, it brought none of the paralysis of grief caused by Sammy's death: rather, as after the passing of the Chevalier, she was urged by the thought of her dead child to more and higher efforts. In the quiet of Oak Glen she wrote this summer a careful study of Dante and Beatrice, for the Concord School of Philosophy. This was a summer school of ten years (1879-88) in which Emerson, Alcott, and W. T. Harris took part. July 20 found her at Concord, where she and Julia had been wont to go together. She says, I cannot think of the sittings of the School without a vision of the rapt expression of her face as she sat and listened to the various speakers. Reminiscences, p. 440. Spite of her grief in miss
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
stone comb, and they 'plauded and 'plauded, and I sat, grinning like a chessy cat, oh! so welly pleased. July 1. [Oak Glen.] Despite my severe fatigue went in town to church; desired in my mind to have some good abiding thought given me to wored it, coming in sight of a better vein and to-day, not without prayerful effort, I got it about ready, D. G. To Maud Oak Glen, August 27, 1894. ... An interesting French gentleman has been giving readings at Mrs. Coleman's. He read us Corneillde the closing address, full of good sense, sentiment and wit — a wonderful man for eighty-two years of age. To Laura Oak Glen, September 6, 1894. Q. What has been your mother's treatment of you latterly? Ans. Quite devilish, thank you. have kissed each other. This thought also came to me: Oh, God, no kingdom is worth praying for but thine. To Laura Oak Glen, August 2, 1895. Dearest Pidge, also Midge, ... I will condescend to inform you that I am well, that Flossy is very
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
ional loss is to be deplored in comparison with loss of moral earnestness. Oak Glen, June 30. ...Finished this afternoon my perusal of the Memoir of Mr. John Pickhe frontier of Christendom be maintained and its domain extended? To Maud Oak Glen, July 18, 1896. My darling wanderer, Here I am comfortably settled for the. Apropos of worldly goods, Cornelius Vanderbilt has had a stroke. To Laura Oak Glen, July 25, 1896. Oh, yes! you now and then do lend me a daughter, and so yorve, as in his case, to stimulate right effort and true feeling. To Laura Oak Glen, August 21, 1896. Being in a spleeny and uncomfortable mood to-day, what re. Have sent note and dollar to A. S. B. for the Armenian orphans. June 27, Oak Glen. My first writing in this dear place. Carrie Hall yesterday moved me down inthat I go away. Have writ a good screed about the Rome of 1843-44. To Laura Oak Glen, September 27, 1897. ... My dear sister and I have lived so long far apart,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
oice against the evil thing whenever occasion offered. July 7. Oak Glen.... my son and his wife came over from Bristol to pass the day. Hea. I suppose it to mean indifference and indolence.... To Laura Oak Glen, September 6, 1899. . . here's a question. Houghton and Miffli September 7. have attacked my proofs fiercely.... To Laura Oak Glen, September 16, 1899. yours received, tres chere. why not consuleautiful summer and autumn. Amen. she was never ready to leave Oak Glen; the town house always seemed at first like a prison. October 2me in this record; she never spoke of it to any of her family.] Oak Glen. June 21. here I am seated once more at my old table, beginning ain the green parlor, which was pretty and pleasant. .. to Laura Oak Glen, August 3, 1900. ... I grieve for the death of King Umberto, asorted me much in the forlorn exchange of my lovely surroundings at Oak Glen for the imprisonment of a town house. November 4. 241 Beacon St
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wisdom which I have not attained.... Maud and Florence were both away in the early part of this summer, and various grandchildren kept her company at Oak Glen. There were other visitors, among them Count Salome di Campello, a cheery guest who cooked spaghetti for her, and helped the granddaughter to set off the Fourth of July fireworks, to her equal pleasure and terror. During his visit she invited the Italian Ambassador Count Mayer des Planches. to spend a couple of days at Oak Glen. On July 14 she writes:-- Not having heard from the Italian Ambassador, the Count and I supposed that he was not coming. In the late afternoon came a letter saying that he would arrive to-morrow. We were troubled at this late intelligence, which gave me no time to invite people to meet the guest. I lay down for my afternoon rest with a very uneasy mind. Remembering St. Paul's words about Angels un
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