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Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 0 Browse Search
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Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb), BOOK 1, chapter 45 (search)
Quiet being thus restored for the present, a no less formidable difficulty remained through the turbulence of the fifth and twenty-first legions, who were in winter quarters sixty miles away at Old Camp, as the place was called. These, in fact, had been the first to begin the mutiny, and the most atrocious deeds had been committed by their hands. Unawed by the punishment of their comrades, and unmoved by their contrition, they still retained their resentment. Cæsar accordingly proposed to send an armed fleet with some of our allies down the Rhine, resolved to make war on them should they reject his authority
at of Noor Mahal, the favorite queen of Shah Jehan, before you, and beside it her husband's humbler grave. Through within and without the Taj is white, still here you will find the walls profusely jeweled, and the purity retained. Flowers are pictured on every block in mosaic of cinnamon-stone, carnelian, turquoise, emerald, and amethyst; the corridors contain the whole Koran, inlaid in jet-black stone; yet the interior, as a whole, exceeds in chastity the spotlessness of the outer dome. Oriental, it is not barbaric. . . . . In a Persian manuscript there still remains a catalogue of the prices of the gems made use of in the building of the Taj, and of the places from which they came. Among those named are coral from Arabia, sapphires from Moldavia, amethysts from Persia, crystal from China, turquoises from Thibet, diamonds from Bundlecund, and lapis lazuli from Ceylon. The master masons were of Constantinople and Bagdad. The varieties of inlaid work are numerous, and some of t
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Tales and Sketches (search)
scription of the last day had the ghastly distinctness of Anelli's painting of the End of the World. Suspended from the front of the rude pulpit were two broad sheets of canvas, upon one of which was the figure of a man, the head of gold, the breast and arms of silver, the belly of brass, the legs of iron, and feet of clay,—the dream of Nebuchadnezzar. On the other were depicted the wonders of the Apocalyptic vision,—the beasts, the dragons, the scarlet woman seen by the seer of Patmos, Oriental types, figures, and mystic symbols, translated into staring Yankee realities, and exhibited like the beasts of a travelling menagerie. One horrible image, with its hideous heads and scaly caudal extremity, reminded me of the tremendous line of Milton, who, in speaking of the same evil dragon, describes him as ‘Swindging the scaly horrors of his folded tail.’ To an imaginative mind the scene was full of novel interest. The white circle of tents; the dim wood arches; the upturned, ear
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25., Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. (search)
uring a northeast gale, slipped by the revenue cutter at Provincetown, with the brig Hope. He was pursued and fired upon, but escaped to St. Lucia, where he sold the vessel and cargo of fish for twenty-five thousand dollars. He brought his Spanish doubloons home sewed into his clothing. Morison. Maritime History of Massachusetts. Jefferson signed the repeal of the embargo on his last day in office. Immediately there ensued a tremendous boom in shipping to Mediterranean, Russian and Oriental ports, which continued until the war of 1812. Hall Gleason. Medford journalism. Journalism in Medford dates back to the winter of 1857—nearly sixty-six years. Not that there were not editors, publishers and printers who had homes in Medford,—there were several of each in earlier days whose journalistic effort was confined to Boston, Cambridge and other places. Among these were Samuel Hall, Elizur Wright and James M. Usher; also Galen James and Rev. Elihu Marvin, whose efforts