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The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1862., [Electronic resource], The freedom of the press in New Orleans. (search)
$25 reward --Ranaway, about the 15th day of May, a mulatto Boy, about five feet five inches high, twenty-seven years old, named Sandy. Left me at Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy river. $25 reward will be paid to any one who will return said boy to M. H. Stokes, at Stokes's Hotel, Richmond, Va. Lieut, Wiley C. Tunstall, my 28--5t* Co. D, 5th A's Reg't.
$25 reward --Ranaway, about the 15th day of May, a mulatto Boy, about five feet five inches high, twenty-seven years old, named Handy. Left me at Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy river. $25 reward will be paid to any one who will return said boy to F. H. Stockes, at Stokes's Hotel, Richmond, Va. Lieut. Wiley C. Tunstall, my 28--5t* Co. D, 5 h Ata Beg't.
$25 reward. --Ranaway, about the 15th day of May, a mulatto Boy, about five feet five inches high, twenty-seven years old, named Sandy. Left me at Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy river. $25 reward will be paid to any one who will return said boy to E. H. Stokes, at Stokes's Hotel, Richmond, Va. Lieut Wiley C. Tunstall. my 28--5t* Co. D. 5th Ala Reg't.
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource], Virginians in the battle of Shiloh, (search)
$25 reward --Ranaway, about the 15th day of May, a mulatto Boy, about five feet five inches high, twenty-seven years old, named Sandy. Left me at Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy river. $15 reward will be paid to any one who will return said boy to E. H, Stokes, at Stokes's Hotel, Richmond, Va. Lieut. Wiley O. Tunstall, my 23--5t* Co. D, 5th Ala Rep't.
$25 reward. --Ranaway, about the 15th day of May, a mulatto Boy, about five feet five inches high, twenty-seven years old, named Sandy. Left me at Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy river. $25 reward will be paid to any one who will return said boy to B. H. Stokes, at Stokes's Hotel, Richmond, Va. Lieut. Wiley C. Tun Tall, my 28--5t* Co. D. 5th Ala Reg't.
of the place anything but pleasant or satisfactory. We processed slowly along, and soon the signs of approaching day streaked the horizon, and in the light of early lawn we bid a last fare well to the scene of our recent uncomfortable experiences. The air was cool and healthful, and the men generally cheerful and good natured. We reached Charles City Court-House at about eight A. M. This is about five miles from Harrison's Landing, and from it a road leads to Barrett's Ferry, on the Chickahominy river, near where it empties into the James. To this point our day's march was intended to reach, and it was said to be twelve miles distant; but my subsequent experience would seem to indicate that it was nearer fifteen. The Charles City Court-House, which is the seat of government of Charles City county, is a very ancients and venerable looking, one story brick building, with two wings. The main building was used as a Court-House, and the wings contain the jury rooms, &c. Adjoining
too late to participate in the seven day's struggle. His troops, have, however, arrived at Fortress Monroe, and have before this arrived at Harrison's Landing. The transport Juniata conveying supplies up the James river, was tired into from Confederate batteries below Harrison's Landing, on the opposite side of the river. She was obliged to run ashore to save being such. On the same side of the river the Confederates have constructed batteries between Harrison's Landing and the Chickahominy river. One of them, which your correspondent saw, was merely a breastwork of sods, about eight feet high, placed one behind the other. Day before yesterday Stonewall Jackson's, who was reported dead, sent a flag of truce, in, conveying a lot of our sick and wounded, whom they could not or would not keep. They however, refuse to receive one from us, basing their refusal upon the fact that General Grant refused their request at Shiloh. Major Stone, of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, who
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1863., [Electronic resource], From the Peninsula — the great raid. (search)
y last night from New Kent C. H. We had pickets at New Kent C. H., Morris's Church, and near Balls's Store, all of these points being about thirty miles from Richmond. These pickets were driven in at an early hour Thursday morning by the 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, commanded by Col. Spears, and numbering about 400 men — that regiment being the entire force which has been so greatly exaggerated. The Yankees after driving in our pickets chased them to Bottom's Bridge, (over the Chickahominy river,) about fifteen miles from the city, which they reached in the afternoon. At this point Col. Shingler dismounted about forty of our cavalry and put them forward as skirmishers. These dismounted men opened fire on the approaching Yankees, and the fire was returned for a short time, but the enemy, getting tired of the sport, retreated about twilight, falling back to Cross-Roads, where they bivouacked for the night. Yesterday, morning early they again took up their backward line of mar
Colonel Whitaker kept the main road to Richmond and struck the Fredericksburg railroad near Kilby's station, and then followed it up to Ashland, where the Second New York was met and both parties returned to camp. By this time it was known in Richmond that the northern defences of that city were threatened, and troops were hastily brought back from Lynchburg and Charlottesville, Amherst Court-house, Louisa Courthouse and the South Anna, and between Chesterfield station and the Chickahominy river. Every bridge, nearly every culvert, and scores of miles of the rail itself have been completely destroyed. One of these bridges was one thousand feet, another seven hundred and fifty feet, another four hundred and twenty feet in length, and quite a number between one hundred and two hundred. These structures were made in Alexandria, and no duplicates are on hand to replace them. Longstreet, with the whole of Pickett's division, and some other troops, moved up to within five mi
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