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The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861., [Electronic resource], From Fortress Monroe--a Yankee account of Doings about there. (search)
olk and Portsmouth, in charge of Capt. Hunter, V. N., went down to Fortress Monroe yesterday and returned in the evening. We learn through this medium that the U. S. steamer Harriet Lane was very badly injured in her brush with the fort at Pig Point. It has been ascertained that six of her men were sent to the hospital on her return to Fortress Monroe. The number of killed we could not learn. The steamer Alabama, from New York, arrived at Fortress Monroe yesterday, full of troops. The following official announcement of the brush at Pig Point on Wednesday, has been sent up by Capt. Pegram, of the Virginia Navy, who is in command of the fort: Pig Point Battery, 9 A. M., May 5th, 1861. Sir: We have just had a smart brush with the Harriet Lane and drove her off. I think several shot were put in her hull. The engagement lasted about twenty minutes. The H. L. commenced the engagement by firing an XI. inch shell. R. B. Pegram. Respectfully submitted
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.the engagement at Pig Point. Norfolk, June 7 1861. The engagement on Wednesday at Pig Point, between the Harriet Lane and our battery, lasted about one hour, during which time there were about fifty-five shot fired between the parties. Four of our shot pierced the enemy's ship, but what damage was done we could not learn. She, however, soon found it was too hot a place for her, and turned her back upon our battery. Two of the shot from the stPig Point, between the Harriet Lane and our battery, lasted about one hour, during which time there were about fifty-five shot fired between the parties. Four of our shot pierced the enemy's ship, but what damage was done we could not learn. She, however, soon found it was too hot a place for her, and turned her back upon our battery. Two of the shot from the steamer were well directed at us, as one struck the muzzle of one of our guns, breaking a piece out of it, and another passed through one of the tents; but there was "no body hurt." We looked for and hoped she would pay us another visit to-day, but she has not yet arrived. The Salem Flying Artillery are quartered on Craney Island, and are the happiest boys I have met with. I spent one night with them, partaking of their kind hospitality. They are anxious that Miss "Harriet Lane" should pay