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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 3 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 0 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 75 (search)
June 5 it was ascertained that the enemy had again abandoned his line of works and fallen back in the direction of Marietta, Ga. On June 6 the command again marched. Arriving near Acworth Station, Ga., went into camp and remained until June 10, when an advance was made upon the enemy, the front line skirmishing with the enemy, who, it seemed, had a well-chosen position. We bivouacked until June 15, when we evacuated and again fell back. On the evening of the 15th the command occupied Pine Mountain; remained here until June 17, when my regiment was placed on the skirmish line and advanced upon the enemy. Though the resistance was stubborn, yet we succeeded in driving him perhaps a mile. Night coming on, my regiment was relieved and ordered to bivouac till morning. June 18, continued to press upon the enemy, and, notwithstanding the heavy rains which were falling, rendering operations exceedingly difficult and unpleasant, they ceased not, and the duty was performed with cheerfuln
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
ey marched to Morris' Hill Church, Ga., and remained in camp from June 7 until June 10, when the corps marched toward Pine Mountain. The enemy having been met in force at that place, by General Howard's [order] the Fifth Indiana Battery and Twenty-Howard, the Fifth Indiana, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, opened fire upon Pine Mountain at 11 a. m. June 15, the enemy having evacuated Pine Mountain, Major-General Stanley's division occupied it, placing Pine Mountain, Major-General Stanley's division occupied it, placing one section of the Fifth Indiana Battery in position upon Pine Mountain, the remaining two sections and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, upon a ridge, midway between Pine and Kenesaw Mountains. June 16, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth PennsPine Mountain, the remaining two sections and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, upon a ridge, midway between Pine and Kenesaw Mountains. June 16, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania were placed in position in front line of General Stanley's division; Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, in front line of General Newton's division. Capt. Peter Simonson, chief of artillery,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 84 (search)
10 in dislodging the enemy; put one section on top of Rocky Face Ridge; opened on the enemy from this position; kept up a scattering fire for two days. May 14 and 15, engaged the enemy at Resaca, silencing their batteries. May 27, was in action at Dallas Grove, Ga.; engaged one of the enemy's batteries; had a pretty lively engagement, but finally succeeded in silencing their battery. June 1, was in action at Dallas Grove, Ga.; had 1 man wounded. June 11, I took position in front of Pine Mountain. I fired thirtyseven rounds, under direction of Captain Bridges, chief of artillery, Fourth Army Corps, without getting any response from the enemy. June 12, fired sixteen rounds from the same position without arousing any fire from the enemy. June 13, moved about threefourths of a mile to the left; went into camp; remained overnight. June 14, moved still farther to the left; went into park in rear of Second Division, Fourth Army Corps; remained in that position until dark, when I mo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 86 (search)
nor to submit the following as a report of the part taken by this command in the campaign in Northern Georgia during the present summer: The battery left Blue Springs, Tenn., near Cleveland, on or about the 3d day of May last, marching with the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, to which it was attached. It took part in all the actions in which the First Division was engaged, being spiritedly engaged with the enemy at Tunnel Hill, Rocky Face Ridge, Dalton,. Resaca, Kingston, Dallas, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Ruff's; Station, Chattahoochee River, Peach, Tree Creek, and Atlanta. In the movements around and south of Atlanta, by which the enemy was, forced to evacuate the place, the battery was but little engaged, the section of 3-inch rifles, under command of Lieut. J. F. Ellison, doing all the firing that was done. As I am only temporarily in command, in consequence of Captain Morrison being wounded, I am unable to make this report more explicit. The records of the batter
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
ection of Captain Aleshire, chief of artillery. I had been nine successive days on the line. The fuses of the spherical case and shell that I used were nearly worthless, and not one in twenty would explode. I moved with the division June 6 and 7, and went into camp near Morris' Hill Church, where I remained during June 7, 8, and 9. I marched with the division on the 10th toward Lost Mountain, but remained in reserve until the 15th, when I was ordered into position about one mile from Pine Mountain, with General Wagner's brigade as support. I fired twenty-four rounds of solid shot without eliciting any reply from the enemy, whose works could not be seen. In the evening I moved my battery 600 yards directly to the front, by order of chief of artillery, Second Division, and occupied some works that had been thrown up by pioneers, within 500 yards of the enemy. I improved and strengthened the works that night, and next morning, the enemy having evacuated his line, I proceeded on th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 89 (search)
I canister; total, 12. 29th, expended 11 shot, 6 shell, and 30 case; total, 47; Private Whitney killed. 30th, relieved by Captain McDowell's (Pennsylvania) battery, and took position near headquarters Fourth Army Corps. Left camp June 6; consumed eight days in marching to or near Acworth, Ga., coming upon the enemy on the 14th. Took position on main line, expending — shot, 18; shell, 26; case, 11; total, 55 rounds. 15th and 16th, moved on Marietta road. 17th, came upon the enemy near Pine Hill, Ga.; took position with Third Di-vision, Fourth Army Corps; expended-shot, 27; shell, 17; total, 44 rounds. 18th, pursued the enemy, driving him, and expending-shot, 121; shell, 113; case 90; total, 324 rounds; Private Hersh killed; Privates Craig and Everett wounded severely; one spare wheel destroyed by shell. 19th, moved on Marietta road. 20th, took position on main line near Kenesaw Mountain, and remained until July 2, expending rounds of ammunition as follows: June 20, 457. June 22, 4
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
189. June 1.-The First Division at Pickett's Mills, where it remained in position until the 6th, skirmishing. The Second Division moved from Dallas to the left, and was in position until the 6th, skirmishing. The First Brigade, Third Division, left at Burnt Hickory. The balance of the division moved forward from that place, and on the 2d took position and remained until the 6th, skirmishing. June 6.-The corps moved forward in pursuit of the enemy, and took position in front of Pine Mountain, where it remained, gradually advancing the lines toward the enemy's works until they were evacuated. June 19.-Advanced to the base of Kenesaw Mountain (the corps taking position on the right of the railroad) and intrenched, remaining in this position, skirmishing and using artillery almost constantly against the enemy's skirmishers and his artillery posted on the summit of the mountain, with no material change until the Second Division moved during the night of the 25th to the right
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 115 (search)
Albany, August 7, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from June 14 to July 6, inclusive. On the morning of the 14th we advanced in line of battle toward the Marietta road, the objective point being Pine Mountain, upon which the enemy had fortifications and artillery. After a difficult and circuitous march through the woods to prevent the development of the movement, we at once debouched from the woods and moved by the right flank, and formed in fron in the edge of the woods. A sharp skirmish attended the formation, and for a time my line was enfiladed, until General Baird moved up on my right. Breast-works were thrown up, and a battery placed in position near my right, which opened on Pine Mountain, farther to the right and near other positions of the army. Joining in the movement on the right and left of the mountain, the enemy were compelled to either fall back or be captured. They chose the former. Our forces had now gained Lost a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
e right, and the Fourteenth Army Corps, on the left. During the night of the 5th the enemy evacuated his works, and early on the morning of the 6th, taking the right of the corps in the pursuit, the division went into camp in the afternoon on Proctor's Creek, covering the road leading from Acworth to Big Shanty, two miles from the former place, where it remained in comparative quiet until the 17th. when it moved in concert with the other divisions of the corps to a position in front of Pine Mountain and formed on the right of Baird's division, connecting with the left of the Fourth Corps in the afternoon. During the 18th and 19th the division changed position several times in the general advance of our lines to the enemy's position near Kenesaw Mountain, and the skirmishing was frequently very sharp, particularly between a part of Morgan's brigade, which was ordered to drive in the enemy's skirmishers and to feel of his position on top of the mountain. This duty was gallantly d
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 131 (search)
he front and took position on the second line, where we remained until the 4th, when we again moved to the left and joined the Fourteenth Army Corps, from which we had been detached since the evacuation of Resaca, and were sent to the top of a high hill to the line. That night the rebels again evacuated. On the 6th we again started in pursuit and marched all day, seeing no rebels. Here we again laid still, and on the 10th again started. About noon of this day we met thein in front of Pine Mountain. That night two companies were sent on picket. Early next day we were relieved and moved to the left, and at night found ourselves to the left and rear of the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, where we lay until the 14th, when we again left camp, in light marching order. We went about a mile to the front and threw up log works; two companies sent out to support the skirmish line. At 3 p. m. we moved still farther to the left, where we threw up another line of works. The regime
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