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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 414 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 129 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 18 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 9 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) or search for Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
ish at Burnt Hickory (or Huntsville). Skirmish near Dallas. May 25-June 5, 1864.Operations on the line of Pumpkin Vine Creek, with combats at New Hope Church, Pickett's Mills, and other points. May 26-June 1, 1864.Combats at and about Dallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.Action at Moulton, Ala. June 9, 1864.Skirmishes near Big Shanty and near Stilesborough. June 10, 1864.Skirmish at Calhoun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combats at Pine Hill, Lost Mountain, Brush Mountain, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, McAfee's Cross-Roads, Kenesaw Mountain, Powder Springs, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and other points. June 24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Station, and Rottenwood Creek. July 5-17, 1864.Operations on the line of the Chattahoochee River, with skirmishes at Howell's, Turner's, and Pace's Ferries, Isham's Ford, and other points. July
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
to our view in another peak called Brush Mountain. To our right was a smaller hill, called Pine Mountain, and beyond it in the distance, Lost Mountain. All these, though linked in a continuous chat landscape that presents itself from any of the hills that abound in that region. Kenesaw, Pine Mountain, and Lost Mountain form a triangle. Pine Mountain, the apex, and Kenesaw and Lost Mountain Pine Mountain, the apex, and Kenesaw and Lost Mountain the base, covering perfectly the town of Marietta, and :the railroad back to the Chattahoochee. On each of these peaks the enemy had his signal station, the summits were crowned with batteries, and as ordered to move toward Marietta, his right on the railroad, General Thomas on Kenesaw and Pine Mountain, and General Schofield off toward Lost Mountain; General Garrard's cavalry on the left, and r General Hooker's left, General Polk was killed on the 14th, and on the morning of the 15th Pine Mountain was found abandoned by the enemy. Generals Thomas and Schofield advanced and found him agai
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
five companies, deployed as skirmishers, under command of Major Calloway. At about 1 p. m. the skirmishers became engaged with the enemy, and continued warmly engaged throughout the day, the enemy hotly contesting every foot of ground, the Twenty-first losing 2 men wounded. On the 11th we threw up light works. On the 12th did nothing. On the 13th we continued skirmishing with the enemy by details made from the regiment, the enemy being compelled to take refuge in his works located on Pine Mountain, a strong position almost north of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 15th it was found that the enemy had evacuated during the night. We immediately moved forward and halted in sight of College Hill, near Marietta, Ga., at 8 a. m. We again moved at 10 a. m., and at sunset threw up light works and remained there until the morning of the 17th, when it was found there was no enemy in our front, he having evacuated under cover of darkness. We followed in line of battle until we were
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
10th June, on which day we advanced skirmishingn) and found the enemy strongly intrenched on Pine Mountain, with his left toward Lost and his right toward Kenesaw Mountain. June 11, took position on artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain with artillery. Remained in this position, with severe skirmishing, the 12th, 13th, and rebel army, who, in company with Generals Johnston and Hardee, was surveying our lines from Pine Mountain. June 15, the rebels vacated Pine Mountain and its strong defenses. We advanced in pursuit Pine Mountain and its strong defenses. We advanced in pursuit and occupied Pine Mountain. We found the enemy in another line of works in cannon-range of his last position. In this advance I suffered the loss of that good and brave officer, Lieut. Thomas M. GuPine Mountain. We found the enemy in another line of works in cannon-range of his last position. In this advance I suffered the loss of that good and brave officer, Lieut. Thomas M. Gunn, topographical engineer of the brigade, who was captured by the enemy while fearlessly in the discharge of his duty. We remained before the enemy, with heavy skirmishing, until the 17th, when the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
; heavy skirmishing; during the night the enemy attacked and was repulsed with heavy loss. We continued the varied scenes, some changes in position, with heavy skirmishing, until the night of June 4, when the enemy withdrew from our front, June 6, marched with the corps east ten miles to within two and a half miles of Acworth, on the railroad, where we remained with comparative quietness until June 10, when we moved three miles southeast and found the enemy in strong position on Pine Mountain in my front. Skirmishing commenced and continued until the night of June 13, when the enemy retreated and my brigade advanced upon the mountain early on the morning of June 14. On this mountain is where Bishop Polk, general of the rebel army, fell by a shot from the Fifth Indiana Artillery, Captain Simonson. The battery was in position at the front and right of my lines. We pursued the enemy two miles to his new position, and found him strongly fortified. June 16, advanced my lines
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 31 (search)
ley, who directed me to take a position on the right of the Fifth Indiana Battery, as support for it, connecting the left of my skirmish line with the right of the Fourteenth Army Corps. I did so, and found that I was immediately in front of Pine Mountain. At night built works in my position. From 11th to 13th, inclusive, remained in works. On 14th, at 6 p. m., moved 300 yards to the left and front into old works, which it was found necessary to strengthen, while the left wing had to build new works. On the 15th marched into enemy's works on Pine Mountain, following Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Halted and remained there until afternoon, then advanced by the flank a short distance, when we were formed in double column on the center, the Ninth Indiana on my right, and the Eighty-Fourth Illinois on my left. Advanced to the skirmish line, which was engaged, and, deploying in line, moved forward under fire and built works near enemy's works. Durin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
igue and watchfulness on the part of officers and men, the behavior of whom was admirable. June 5, remained in the same position. June 6, marched to Morris' Hill Church, bringing up the rear of the corps, and leaving Kimball's brigade behind to guard and bring up the corps hospitals. June 7, General Kimball having performed this duty, rejoined the division. He had several skirmishes with the enemy's cavalry. June 8 and 9, remained in camp. June 10, marched to a position in front of Pine Mountain, taking position to the right and rear of General Stanley's division. June 11, 12, 13, and 14, skirmishing and changes of position. The enemy retired on the night of the 14th. June 15, the corps was ordered to attack the enemy in his new position, my division to lead. Division was formed in column of attack, preceded by three regiments deployed as skirmishers, under command of Colonel Bradley, Fifty-first Illinois, who conducted the advance with great skill. The enemy's skirmishers
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
ss in regiment. June 8, moved at 7 a. m., rejoining the division at 2 p. m. and camping four miles from Acworth. June 9, lay in camp. June 10, marched at 7 a. m., halting frequently and making but little progress, camping 7 p. m., having advanced but three miles. Colonel Marsh having been ordered to Nashville for medical treatment, Lieutenant-Colonel Kerr took command of regiment to-day. June 11, moved at 9 a. m. very slowly, the road being crowded with troops, and at 12 halted near Pine Mountain. Remained at this place until June 14. The roads were very bad by reason of daily heavy rains. June 14, advanced one mile. June 15, from 2 p. m. to 6 p. m., advanced two miles, regiment being formed in close column by division, and bayonets fixed, in momentary expectation of a charge. At 6 p. m., enemy being found strongly posted in our immediate front, the brigade halted and immediately built a line of works, where we lay for the night. During the day there had been constant skirmi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
the 6th instant, in accordance with orders, I moved my command from my position near New Hope Church to the left, some six miles in an easterly direction, to Morris' Hill Church, going into camp on the right of General Harker's brigade, about two miles from Acworth. Here the command rested until the morning of the 10th instant, when I moved forward some four miles, and formed line of battle on General Kimball's right, confronting the enemy, who occupied a strongly intrenched position on Pine Mountain. The 11th, 12th, 13th,. and 14th were spent in skirmishing, to ascertain the enemy's strength and exact position, and in fortifying the ground gained by pushing the enemy to their main works. During the night of the 14th instant the enemy retired from their works, and at 4.30 o'clock the following morning my skirmishers advanced and took possession of them. Advancing cautiously we soon developed the enemy, strongly intrenched in his new position. My brigade was formed in column of re
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
uite easy range of the enemy's infantry arms until the 5th of June, on the night previous to which the enemy evacuated their position. Followed the rebels from here with occasional skirmishing until the 11th, when they were met in force near Pine Mountain. On the 14th, the enemy's left flank being turned, my regiment took part in pursuit of him to a position where his line rested on Pine Mountain. During the night of that day he evacuated again. The 15th was occupied assuming another linPine Mountain. During the night of that day he evacuated again. The 15th was occupied assuming another line after coming up with the enemy, during which some skirmishing was done. On the morning of the 17th the rebels were found to have evacuated, and they were followed immediately and found to have given back in the direction of Kenesaw Mountain. On the following morning my regiment was placed on picket at, 2.30 a. m., and at 8 a. m. I was ordered by Colonel Bartleson, One hundredth Illinois Volunteers, to advance the line, he being in command of the picket force from the brigade, and to dri
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