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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 8 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 6 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
r right, the other in the rear of the pass, to our left, evidently in the enemy's main line. Early on the morning of the 9th I advanced Carlin's brigade across Mill Creek to relieve some of the regiments of Wood's brigade, which had been thrown in there on the evening previous, and was occupying the ground at the base of Chattoogy, relying confidently on the tried troops of Carlin's brigade, to advance wherever footing could be found, I ordered my reserve brigade (General King's) across Mill Creek, to within close supporting distance. A careful reconnaissance by General Carlin all along his line, and to a considerable distance below his right, disclosed mained in the position in which the previous night had left us, skirmishing being kept up all day along my whole line. During the day I caused the bridges over Mill Creek (which, owing to the dam thrown across the stream within the gap by the enemy, was here too deep to be conveniently forded) to be repaired and others built to f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
camped for the night. May 9.-Received orders to finish a reconnaissance which had been begun by Colonel Wood's brigade, Butterfield's division, around the point of Chattoogata Mountain, south side of the gap. Moved brigade forward, crossing Mill Creek. Relieved Colonel Wood's brigade. Placed the Eighty-eighth Indiana and One hundred and fourth Illinois into position along the spur extending from the point of the mountain to the gap and overlooking the enemy's works in front. The Forty-secadily, driving the enemy's skirmishers into rifle-pits. They were then withdrawn and the brigade remained in its position until 3 a. m. May 11.-Pursuant to orders of General Johnson, being relieved by Third Brigade, it was withdrawn across Mill Creek to a range of hills, where it remained during the day and night. May 12.--Marched from Buzzard Roost to and through Snake Creek Gap, and encamped about one mile east of the gap. May 13.-Moved about one-fourth of a mile on the road leadi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
Illinois Infantry, Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the One hundred and fourth Illinois Infantry during the campaign in Georgia: The regiment left Ringgold, Ga., on the 7th day of May, numbering 279 enlisted men, carrying muskets, and 17 commissioned officers. They marched to Tunnel Hill and bivouacked. The 8th they moved in front of Buzzard Roost. On the 9th the regiment was ordered to move across Mill Creek and relieve the Seventythird Ohio, of the Twentieth Corps, stationed on a ridge at the right of the creek, between the creek and mountain, the Eighty-eighth Indiana forming on their left. They remained on this line until the 10th, keeping up a lively skirmish fire at times, without losing any men. At daylight on the 11th they were relieved by the Twentyfirst Ohio, and moved back to their former line, where they remained all day. On the 12th they marched at 6 o'clock in the morning and rea
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 121 (search)
the woods on the opposite hill-side across Chambers' Mill creek. The advance was made across open fields and under the enemy's fire of musketry and artillery, by passing the line rapidly from one position to the next that might offer advantage. After making the second halt the enemy's reserves were seen to be retreating, when I ordered the line forward to the works. Had it not been for the marshy character of the ground over which the lines had to pass, and the delay caused by crossing Mill Creek, we would have captured some of the enemy and possibly his artillery. A caisson and its contents, which they upset in the flight, was the only capture of the charge. The enemy having retreated to the woods on our right, and our right being exposed, I deployed Company G, Lieut. George W. Bricker, and Company B, Lieut. P. A. Weaver. These officers deployed their companies and made a dashing advance to the crest of the hill under a severe fire. The right being still exposed, Major Locher,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
from the summit of the first spur of Rocky Face Ridge, which stood directly in the mouth of Mill Creek Gap. The second spur, immediately in front of the first, was taken in the same manner by a strong skirmish line. At the same time I deployed two companies, A and F, of the Thirty-fourth Illinois, Captain Ege commanding, to occupy a hill on the right of the railroad, and to the right rear of the crest first taken. These men, in reaching this hill, were compelled to wade the backwater of Mill Creek, waist deep. They plunged into the water, crossed, and scaling the hill at a point where it was so steep that they were compelled to hold on by the undergrowth, drove a battalion of the enemy from it, and held it antil the Ninety-eighth Ohio relieved them. May 9 to 12, position unchanged; constant skirmishing. May 12, marched at 6 a. m. to mouth of Snake Creek Gap. May 13, marched through the gap. May 14, with the Ninety-eighth Ohio, One hundred and eighth Ohio, and Thirty-fourth I
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 158 (search)
Ga., May 30, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment during the late movement from Ringgold, Ga., and action near this place: The regiment moved with the brigade from Ringgold on the morning of 4he 7th instant and bivouacked near Tunnel Hill same evening. On the 8th and 9th moved to the right and front with the brigade to a point near Mill Creek Gap. On the evening of the 9th the regiment was ordered out to build a bridge across Mill Creek, near the gap, and construct a road for getting artillery in position at the gap. The work was completed at 2 a. m. of the 10th, when I returned to the brigade with a loss of 2 men wounded. Remained in bivouac until the morning of the 12th, when I moved with the brigade south and to the east side of Rocky Face Ridge, through Snake Creek Gap, bivouacking near the east end of the gap. On the 13th the regiment with the brigade took position in front of the enemy, west of the railroad, north
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
as an intelligent man, and gave a story that is partly corroborated by what is known. Further, he says, considerable artillery in the valley east of Rocky Face Ridge, northeast of Dalton; nearly the whole of Johnston's army there; Stewart's division on Rocky Face Ridge. The rebels are going to fight, and in good spirits. Hood's and Hardee's corps in the valley. Loring's division has come from Rome; seven divisions besides Polk's; estimates divisions at about 6,000. They have dammed up Mill Creek so that we will have to swim it. They have been fortifying for several days on Rocky Face Ridge, &c. 6.05 p. m., General Newton directed to go into camp in the position he was occupying, and to connect pickets with General Wood if possible. 7.30, received orders from General Thomas to send re-enforcements to General Wood, and to instruct him to continue his reconnaissance as far as practicable. Immediately sent a note to him, asking what reenforcements he needed, and where he needed the
hester. When this second break occurred, the Sixth and Nineteenth corps were moved over toward the Millwood pike to help Wilson on the left, but the day was so far spent that they could render him no assistance, and Ramseur's division, which had maintained some organization, was in such tolerable shape as to check him. Meanwhile Torbert passed around to the west of Winchester to join Wilson, but was unable to do so till after dark. Crook's command pursued the enemy through the town to Mill Creek, I going along. Just after entering the town Crook and I met, in the main street, three young girls, who gave us the most hearty reception. One of these young women was a Miss Griffith, the other two Miss Jennie and Miss Susie Meredith. During the day they had been watching the battle from the roof of the Meredith residence, with tears and lamentations, they said, in the morning when misfortune appeared to have overtaken the Union troops, but with unbounded exultation when, later, th
put my head down toward the pommel of my saddle and listened intently, trying to locate and interpret the sound, continuing in this position till we had crossed Mill Creek, about half a mile from Winchester. The result of my efforts in the interval was the conviction that the travel of the sound was increasing too rapidly to be accounted for by my own rate of motion, and that therefore my army must be falling back. At Mill Creek my escort fell in behind, and we were going ahead at a regular pace, when, just as we made the crest of the rise beyond the stream, there burst upon our view the appalling spectacle of a panic-stricken army-hundreds of slighas greatly disturbed by the sight, but at once sent word to Colonel Edwards, commanding the brigade in Winchester, to stretch his troops across the valley, near Mill Creek, and stop all fugitives, directing also that the transportation be passed through and parked on the north side of the town. As I continued at a walk a few
October 26. At Mill Creek, five miles from Romney, Gen. Kelley's force came upon the rebel's outposts, which they drove in, and advanced to the Indian Mound Cemetery, to the west of the town, where the rebels made a stand and opened fire with a twelve-pound rifled gun, placed in a very commanding position in the cemetery, and with a mountain howitzer from the high grounds on the east bank of the river, which point commanded our approach for a distance of over a mile. At the east end of the bridge the enemy had also thrown up intrenchments, from which they kept up a constant fire of musketry upon the head of the column. One twelve-pounder and two six-pounders responded to the artillery on Kelley's post until the General was enabled to fully comprehend the enemy's position, when he soon gave the command to charge upon their batteries and intrenchments. The cavalry, under the lead of Capts. Keys and McGhee, dashed across the river, (which was fordable at this point,) while the i
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