Your search returned 293 results in 72 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1863, and duty there till February 21. Moved to Lake Providence, La., February 21, thence to Milliken's Bend, La. Movoved to Memphis, Tenn., January 10, 1863, thence to Lake Providence, La., January 21, and duty there till April. Movementon, 17th Army Corps, to December, 1863. Moved to Lake Providence, La., February 20, and to Milliken's Bend, La., April 17. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., January 26, thence to Lake Providence, La., February 22, and duty there till April. Movemend to Memphis, Tenn., January 20-25, 1863, thence to Lake Providence, La., February 20, and to Milliken's Bend, La., April 17e of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Yazoo City May 23. Lake Providence June 10. Patrol duty on the Mississippi River from oved to Memphis, Tenn., January 20, 1863, thence to Lake Providence, La., February 22. Moved to Milliken's Bend April 10.. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., January 20, thence to Lake Providence, La., February 22, and to Milliken's Bend, La., April 17
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
January 10, thence to Young's Point, La., January 17 and to Lake Providence, La., February 8. Duty there till April. Movement on Bruins, January 10, thence to Young's Point, La., January 17, and to Lake Providence March 8. Action at Old River, Lake Providence, February 10.Lake Providence, February 10. Provost duty at Lake Providence till August. Pin Hook and Caledonia Bayou, Macon, May 10. Expedition to Mechanicsburg May 26-June 4Lake Providence till August. Pin Hook and Caledonia Bayou, Macon, May 10. Expedition to Mechanicsburg May 26-June 4. Near Lake Providence June 9. Moved to Red Bone Church August 1 and duty there till February 5, 1864. Garrison duty at Vicksburg tiLake Providence June 9. Moved to Red Bone Church August 1 and duty there till February 5, 1864. Garrison duty at Vicksburg till March 4. Veterans on furlough March and April. Non-veterans on duty at Vicksburg till April 5, then joined Regiment at Cairo, Ill. Vnuary 10, and to Young's Point, La., January 18. Moved to Lake Providence, La., February 8 and duty there till April 20. Movement on Brunuary 10, and to Young's Point, La., January 17. Moved to Lake Providence, La., February 8, and duty there till April 20. Movement on Br
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
Post and garrison duty at Vicksburg, Miss., till October, 1864. Expedition from Haines Bluff up Yazoo River April 19-23. Near Mechanicsburg April 20. Lake Providence May 27. Moved to mouth of White River, Ark., October 15. Duty there and at Vicksburg, Miss., till February, 1865. Ordered to Algiers, La., February 25. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Steele's Command, Military District of West Mississippi, to June, 1865. Dept. of the Gulf to June, 1866. Service. At Lake Providence till May, 1864. Post and garrison duty at Goodrich Landing, La., till December, 1864. Action at Langley's Plantation, Issaqueena County, March 22, 1864.65. Unattached, District of Vicksburg, Miss., and Dept. of Mississippi, to March, 1866. Service. Post and garrison duty at Goodrich Landing and at Lake Providence, La., till February, 1865. Actions at Issaqueena County March 22, 1864. Goodrich Landing March 24. Bayou Mason July 2. Issaqueena County July 10.
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 13: Vicksburg campaign (search)
culty in opening the passage, but the line would be a precarious one after the army had crossed the Mississippi--that Sherman preferred a movement by the way of the Yazoo Pass against Grenada and Jackson, or an alternative one by the way of Lake Providence to Bayou Tensas and the Red River. While Sherman differed from Grant, and suggested these eccentric movements which would have hopelessly removed the army from its most direct line of operations, Dana thought that Sherman's mind was gradualas first projected, was such that the advance naturally fell to its lot; besides, he entered zealously into the plan from the first, while Sherman doubted and criticised, and McPherson, whom General Grant would really much prefer, is away at Lake Providence; and though I understand him to approve of the scheme, he has had no active part in it. It is to be noted that while the secretary made haste to thank Dana for his several despatches, he cautioned him in reply that he should carefully av
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
among unopened parcels a present from the United States for her husband, reserving it for her children; and she dwelt with emotion on the flags at half-mast in New York when the news of his death was received. But I doubt if history will attach to British supremacy in India an importance and sacredness comparable with the cause of antislavery, now imperilled from England. You will read the Adjutant-General's speech Address of Lorenzo Thomas, Adjutant-General, to Union soldiers at Lake Providence, La., April 8, 1863, where he was organizing colored troops. to the soldiers. Our policy is fixed; there can be no retreat. Let us have the God-speed of all who hate slavery! To Mr. Cobden, April 26:— I see but one course for England. Let her act upon her antislavery history, and let the slave-mongers know that they can expect nothing from her. Say it frankly and openly, the sooner the better. Their only hope is England. Such a declaration, besides its perfect consistency wi
, Natchitoches, La., assistant surgeon. George W. Leatherman, Mississippi, surgeon McNeil's Fourth Louisiana cavalry. Edward D. Stigner, Stockton, Mo. (one course), assistant surgeon Eleventh Missouri infantry. Thomas Charles Thompson, Matagorda, Tex., assistant surgeon Edgar's Texas battery. David Custeberry, Harrisonburg, La., assistant surgeon Second battery heavy artillery. Harfield McCormick, Shreveport, La., assistant surgeon Sixth Louisiana dismounted cavalry. James G. Wiley, Lake Providence, surgeon Harrison's Third Louisiana cavalry. Albert S. Davidson, Alexandria, La., surgeon Conner's Louisiana battery. Henry H. Key, Mt. Lebanon, La., assistant surgeon Fifth Louisiana cavalry. Charles Jones, Jr., New Orleans, medical purveyor district of Louisiana. Charles Alexander Cruikshanks, Alexandria, La., consolidated Crescent regiment infantry. May, 1865, sitting at Natchitoches: William Watt, Elysian Fields, La., surgeon Yeager's First Texas cavalry. James E. Keaten, Chene
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
3; 46, 4; 48, 1; 50, 5; 57, 1-57, 3; 76, 1, 76, 2; 88, 2; 97, 1; 111, 9; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 171 La Fayette, Ky. 150, E3 La Fayette, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 150, F8; 154, B11 La Fayette, Va. 118, 1; 141, G13 Lagrange, Tenn. 117, 1; 135-A; 150, G2; 154, B12; 171 Lake City, Fla. 135-A; 146, A7 Lake George, Fla. 135-A; 146, D10 Lake Monroe, Fla. 146, F11 Lake Natchez, La. 156, D6 Lakeport, La. 135-A Lake Providence, La. 117, 1; 135-A; 155, A6, 135-A; 155, B6; 171 Lake Saint Joseph, La. 155, D6 Lake Spring, Mo. 152, H6 Lake Village, Ark. 154, G6 Lamar, Miss. 135-A; 154, B12 Lamar, Mo. 135-A; 160, A11 Lamar, Tex. 43, 8; 54, 1; 65, 10 Lancaster, Ky. 9, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 141, F1; 150, B11; 151, H12 Fort Lancaster, Tex. 54, 1 Lane's Prairie, Mo. 152, F6 Fort Lapwai, Idaho Ter. 134, 1 Laredo, Tex. 54, 1; 171 Larkinsville, Ala. 2
er arms; and the other division commanders, admonished by the movements of the last few days, had their horses saddled, and were breakfasting early to be ready in case of an attack. It was well known the enemy were approaching our lines, and there had been more or less skirmishing for three days preceding the battle. The consequence was our breakfasts were ordered at an early hour, and our horses saddled to be ready in case of an attack. Report of Major-General McPherson, dated Lake Providence, La., March 26, 1863. McPherson at this time was on Grant's staff; he was at W. H. L. Wallace's headquarters on the night of the 5th, and on the morning of the 6th. They at once put their commands into line. The entire national force on the ground at the time of the assault, was thirty-three thousand effective men. Lewis Wallace had about five thousand more, at Crump's landing, making Grant's whole force between fifty and sixty-regiments. Grant estimated the enemy's strength at sixt
ampaign the Vicksburg canal continuous labor for months rise in river failure of canal Lake Providence scheme difficulties of this route abandonment of the plan alarm and subsequent derision streams, a circuitous route, through bayous, and rivers, and swamps, could be opened, from Lake Providence on the Louisiana side, seventy miles above Vicksburg, and a passage found, through the Red a passage, avoiding Vicksburg. Grant gave orders for cutting a way from the Mississippi to Lake Providence and went himself to that place on the 4th of February, remaining there several days. Thisf the overhanging forests and fallen timber with which it was ob. structed. The land, from Lake Providence, and also from Bayou Macon, recedes until the lowest interval between the two widens out inntration of all the forces of the expedition at Milliken's bend; McPherson was brought from Lake Providence and the Yazoo pass, and Sherman from Steele's bayou; Hurlbut was stripped of every man that
onel Deitzler and Lieutenant-Colonel Duff, from Lake Providence, fifty odd miles above here. On examining thall the enemy's river batteries. Another is by Lake Providence, and the network of bayous connecting it with Rineer officers. McPherson's army corps is at Lake Providence, prosecuting the work there. They could not bere not yet down. The work of getting through Lake Providence and Bayou Macon there is but little possibilityf the success of the enterprise. The land from Lake Providence and also from Bayou Macon recedes until the low Ordinary Ohio river boats can now pass from Lake Providence into Bayou Macon, and thence by easy navigation trouble on the other side of the river between Lake Providence and Milliken's bend. General Grant to Generaotection to the leased plantations from here to Lake Providence, to resist a threatened attack from Kirby Smith 11, 1863. The long line of plantations from Lake Providence to Milliken's bend, it has been perfectly impos
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8