hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 182 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 182 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
of the same hath beene extended from the Iland of Roanoak, (the same having bene the place of our sdiscovery was to the Chesepians, distant from Roanoak about 130. miles, the passage to it was very owne Savages began to make their assembly at Roanoak , at his commandement sent abroad unto them, a: whereupon he landed fifteene men in the Isle of Roanoak, furnished plentifully with all maner of f those townes with them, to our Governour at Roanoak , or their answere. We also understood of the foure they received into their boate, leaving Roanoak , and landed on a little Island on the right h at the driving of our eleven Englishmen from Roanoak , hee thought to deferre the revenge thereof nhe Assistants, was delivered of a daughter in Roanoak , and the same was christened there the Sonday for fresh water, so we deferred our going to Roanoak untill the next morning, and caused some of tomming away they were prepared to remove from Roanoak 50 miles into the maine. Therefore at my depa[20 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage made to the coasts of America , with two barks, where in were Captaines M. Philip Amadas, and M. Arthur Barlowe, who discovered part of the Countrey now called Virginia , Anno 1584. Written by one of the said Captaines, and sent to sir Walter Ralegh knight, at whose charge and direction, the said voyage was set forth. (search)
usion of the devil) the captaine or Lord of the town came suddenly upon them, and slewe them every one, reserving the women and children: and these two have oftentimes since perswaded us to surprize Piemacum his towne, having promised and assured us, that there will be found in it great store of commodities. But whether their perswasion be to the ende they may be revenged of their enemies, or for the love they beare to us, we leave that to the tryall hereafter. Beyond this Island called Roanoak , are maine Islands very plentifull of fruits and other naturall increases, together with many townes, and villages, along the side of the continent, some bounding upon the Islands, and some stretching up further into the land. When we first had sight of this countrey, some thought the first land we saw to bee the continent: but after we entred into the Haven, we saw before us another mighty long Sea: for there lyeth along the coast a tracte of Islands, two hundreth miles in length, adjoy
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage made by Sir Richard Greenvile, for Sir Walter Ralegh, to Virginia , in the yeere 1585. (search)
breach called the Cape of Feare. The 24. we came to anker in a harbour, where wee caught in one tyde so much fish as would have yeelded us twentie pounds in London : this was our first landing in Florida . The 26. we came to anker at Wocokon. The 29. wee weighed anker to bring the Tyger into the harbour, where through the unskilfulnesse of the Master whose name was Fernando, the Admirall strooke on ground, and sunke. The 3. we sent word of our arriving at Wococon, to Wingina at Roanoak . The 6. M. John Arundel was sent to the maine, and Manteo with him: and Captaine Aubry and Captaine Boniten the same day were sent to Croatoan, where they found two of our men left there with 30. other by Captaine Reymond, some 20. dayes before. The 8. Captaine Aubry and Captaine Boniten returned, with two of our men found by them, to us at Wocokon. The 11. day the Generall accompanied in his Tilt boate with Master John Arundell, Master Stukeley, and divers other Gentlemen, Mast
breach called the Cape of Feare. The 24. we came to anker in a harbour, where wee caught in one tyde so much fish as would have yeelded us twentie pounds in London : this was our first landing in Florida . The 26. we came to anker at Wocokon. The 29. wee weighed anker to bring the Tyger into the harbour, where through the unskilfulnesse of the Master whose name was Fernando, the Admirall strooke on ground, and sunke. The 3. we sent word of our arriving at Wococon, to Wingina at Roanoak . The 6. M. John Arundel was sent to the maine, and Manteo with him: and Captaine Aubry and Captaine Boniten the same day were sent to Croatoan, where they found two of our men left there with 30. other by Captaine Reymond, some 20. dayes before. The 8. Captaine Aubry and Captaine Boniten returned, with two of our men found by them, to us at Wocokon. The 11. day the Generall accompanied in his Tilt boate with Master John Arundell, Master Stukeley, and divers other Gentlemen, Mast
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An account of the particularities of the imployments of the English men left in Virginia by Sir Richard Greenevill under the charge of Master Ralph Lane Generall of the same, from the 17. of August 1585. until the 18. of June 1586. at which time they departed the Countrey: sent and directed to Sir Walter Ralegh. (search)
of the same hath beene extended from the Iland of Roanoak, (the same having bene the place of our sg by estimation fourescore miles distant from Roanoak . The passage from thence was through a broad our discovery was to Chawanook distant from Roanoak about 130. miles. Our passage thither lyeth t would have reduced our whole habitation from Roanoak and from the harborough and port there (which for, and sent his sonne into the Pinnesse to Roanoak , to enter presently so farre into that River thousand bowes, preparing to come upon us at Roanoak , and that the Mangoaks also were joyned in tht. The next morning wee arrived at our home Roanoak . I have set downe this Voyage somewhat par, and brought his sonne that he best loved to Roanoak with mee, it did not a little asswage all devt me word that he would himselfe come over to Roanoak , but from day to day he deferred, onely to br owne Savages began to make their assembly at Roanoak , at his commandement sent abroad unto them, a[3 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first part declaring the particularities of the Countrey of Virginia. (search)
r discoverie of the same hath beene extended from the Iland of Roanoak, (the same having bene the place of our settlement orcotan , being by estimation fourescore miles distant from Roanoak . The passage from thence was through a broad sound withinur furthest discovery was to the Chesepians, distant from Roanoak about 130. miles, the passage to it was very shallow and st place of our discovery was to Chawanook distant from Roanoak about 130. miles. Our passage thither lyeth through a brong also, and would have reduced our whole habitation from Roanoak and from the harborough and port there (which by proofe insome agreed for, and sent his sonne into the Pinnesse to Roanoak , to enter presently so farre into that River with two douber of three thousand bowes, preparing to come upon us at Roanoak , and that the Mangoaks also were joyned in the same confee farre spent. The next morning wee arrived at our home Roanoak . I have set downe this Voyage somewhat particularly, t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second part touching the conspiracie of Pemisapan, the discovery of the same, and at the last, of our request to depart with Sir Francis Drake for England . (search)
e killed, and that we had taken Menatonon prisoner, and brought his sonne that he best loved to Roanoak with mee, it did not a little asswage all devises against us: on the other side, it made Ensenokisko joyntly with this Menatonons messenger sent foure and twentie of his principallest men to Roanoak to Pemisapan, to signifie that they were ready to perfourme the same, and so had sent those his: and in like sort the Mandoags received the imprest. The day of their assembly aforesaid at Roanoak was appointed the 10. of June: all which the premises were discovered by Skyco, the King Menatodayes provision to serve for my voyage. He sent me word that he would himselfe come over to Roanoak , but from day to day he deferred, onely to bring the Weopomeioks with him & the Mandoags, whoses after. It was the last of May 586 when all his owne Savages began to make their assembly at Roanoak , at his commandement sent abroad unto them, and I resolved not to stay longer upon his comming
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage made by a ship sent in the yeere 1586, to the reliefe of the Colony planted in Virginia , at the sole charges of Sir Walter Ralegh. (search)
into divers places of the countrey, aswell to see if he could heare any newes of the Colony left there by him the yeere before, under the charge of Master Lane his deputy, as also to discover some places of the countrey: but after some time spent therein, not hearing any newes of them, and finding the places which they inhabited desolate, yet unwilling to loose the possession of the countrey which Englishmen had so long held: after good deliberation, hee determined to leave some men behinde to reteine possession of the Countrey: whereupon he landed fifteene men in the Isle of Roanoak, furnished plentifully with all maner of provision for two yeeres, and so departed for England . Not long after he fell with the Isles of Acores, on some of which Islands he landed, and spoiled the townes of all such things as were woorth cariage, where also he tooke divers Spanyards. With these and many other exploits done by him in this voyage, aswell outward as homeward, he returned into England .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fourth voyage made to Virginia with three ships, in the yere 1587. Wherein was transported the second Colonie. (search)
tie of his best men, intending to passe up to Roanoak foorthwith, hoping there to finde those fifteGovernour to contend with them, but passed to Roanoak , and the same night at sunne-set went aland one by divers Savages, which were come over to Roanoak , either of purpose to espie our company, and f those townes with them, to our Governour at Roanoak , or their answere. We also understood of the Croatoan, how that the 15 Englishmen left at Roanoak the yeere before, by Sir Richard Grinvile, wefoure they received into their boate, leaving Roanoak , and landed on a little Island on the right hd the other Savages with us over the water to Roanoak . Although the mistaking of these Savages someement of Sir Walter Ralegh, was christened in Roanoak , and called Lord thereof, and of Dasamonguepehe Assistants, was delivered of a daughter in Roanoak , and the same was christened there the Sonday prepare himselfe for the same, departed from Roanoak the seven and twentieth of August in the morn[1 more...]
safe at Hatorask, where our ship and pinnesse ankered: the Governour went aboord the pinnesse, accompanied with fortie of his best men, intending to passe up to Roanoak foorthwith, hoping there to finde those fifteene Englishmen, which Sir Richard Grinvile had left there the yeere before, with whom hee meant to have conference, o this were all the saylers, both in the pinnesse, and shippe, perswaded by the Master, wherefore it booted not the Governour to contend with them, but passed to Roanoak , and the same night at sunne-set went aland on the Island, in the place where our fifteene men were left, but we found none of them, nor any signe that they had od disappointed his wicked pretenses. The eight and twentieth, George Howe, one of our twelve Assistants was slaine by divers Savages, which were come over to Roanoak , either of purpose to espie our company, and what number we were, or else to hunt Deere, whereof were many in the Island. These Savages being secretly hidden amo
1 2