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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 220 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 74 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 4 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
at Lee's Cross-Roads, near Tunnel Hill. Skirmish near Ringgold Gap. May 3, 1864.Skirmish at Catoosa Springs. Skirmish at Red Clay. Skirmish at Chickamauga Creek. May 4, 1864.Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair, jr., assumes command of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Skirmish on the Varnell's Station Road. May 5, 1864.Skirmish near Tunnel Hill. May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (9th and 12th) and at Dalton (13th). May 13, 1864.Skirmish at Tilton. May 14-15, 1864.Battle of Resaca. May 15, 1864.Skirmish at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's)
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
a. May 6, all the armies moved forward, General Thomas on Tunnel Hill, a gravelly range of hills covering the mouth of the famous Buzzard Roost Pass through Rocky Face Ridge; General Schofield along the east of that range approaching Dalton from the north, and General Mc- Pherson aiming for Resaca, eighteen miles south of Daold it, and on the 9th General Schofield pushed down close on Dalton from the north, while General Thomas renewed his demonstration against Buzzard Roost and Rocky Face Ridge, pushing it almost to a battle. One division (General Newton's) of the Fourth Corps (General Howard's) carried the ridge, and turning south toward Dalton fow by the same route, and on the 11th the whole army excepting General Howard's corps and some cavalry left to watch Dalton, was in motion on the west side of Rocky Face Ridge for Snake Creek Gap and Resaca. The next day we moved against Resaca, General McPherson on the direct road, preceded by General Kilpatrick's cavalry, Genera
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 8 (search)
anship, seems to adapt them peculiarly for this special arm. Their three years experience in the field adds important elements to their efficiency and has combined to render the artillery of your command unusually reliable and effective. At Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw, and amid the varied and bloody operations before Atlanta, it sustained its appropriate share of the work most creditably. Its practice at Rocky Face Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain, where at unusual elevation it was called uponRocky Face Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain, where at unusual elevation it was called upon to silence or dislodge the enemy, was extraordinary. Abundant proof of this was obtained from personal inspection of the enemy's works after we gained possession of them, which proof is fully confirmed by the concurrent acknowledgment of the enemy. The peculiar nature of the campaign and the gallantry of the artillery officers are alike illustrated by the fact that three division chiefs of artillery were killed, and the chief of artillery of the Army of the Tennessee seriously wounded by t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
t-Office about 4 p. m. and camped for the night, picketing strongly the roads leading from Buzzard Roost and Dalton, as well as the approaches from the direction of Villanow. General Kilpatrick's division of cavalry took post at or near Gordon's Spring to be in readiness to establish communication with the Army of the Tennessee, which was expected at Villanow on the 8th. On the morning of the 8th Harker's brigade, of Newton's division, Howard's corps, was pushed along the crest of Rocky Face Ridge to within half a mile of the rebels' signal station, where it came upon obstructions of too formidable character to admit of farther progress, except with very severe loss; it was instructed to hold the position. Wood's division, of the Fourth Corps; Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, and Butterfield's division, of the Twentieth Corps, then pushed forward a line of skirmishers and drove the enemy to his intrenchments, our men occupying the mouth of Buzzard Roost. Geary's divisi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
ked indications of improvement. After the movement to the south of Atlanta, which resulted in its evacuation, the troops had access to the extensive corn-fields on the line of the march and improved rapidly, and on entering the city on the 7th of September there was little if any of the scorbutic taint perceptible, and the men were in finer condition and better able to. take the field than at any time since their leaving Chattanooga. The troops wounded at and near Buzzard Roost and Rocky Face Ridge were transferred by rail to the hospitals at Chattanooga. Those wounded near Resaca were treated for some days at the division hospitals and thence transferred to the general field hospital, where the most seriously wounded were retained until they were in condition to be conveyed in the hospital train to the hospitals at the rear. After the first action near Dallas, the wounded were brought in wagons to Kingston and thence by rail to Chattanooga. Those wounded in the last action nea
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
of the most formidable character, having accomplished their mission. In this advance I deeply regret to mention the loss of Major Boyd, of the Eighty-fourth Indiana. He was severely wounded and has since died. Brave, quick, energetic, and honorable, he was a most useful and valuable officer. His loss was deeply felt. We remained in front of Rocky Face, engaged in skirmishing every day, until the 12th, when this brigade was moved to the right of the railroad, where it passes through Rocky Face Ridge. Here we intrenched, working night and day, in face of a most energetic and watchful foe, under heavy fire, and firmly maintained our position in pistol-shot range of the enemy's works until they evacuated them. They were of the most formidable character. On the 13th we pursued the rebels, and on the 14th, the First Brigade having the advance, they were found on the road from Dalton to Resaca, near the latter place. My brigade was sent forward to develop their position. Throwing
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
his command on the 3d day of May, 1864, from our camp at Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., to Red Clay, on the Georgia line, and camped for the night. May 4, marched with the division to Catoosa Springs, Ga. (with light skirmishing), for concentration with the army, where we rested until May 7, when we marched with the corps, drove the enemy from and took possession of Tunnel Hill, Ga. For several succeeding days we advanced upon and ineffectually endeavored to drive the enemy from Rocky Face Ridge in our front. My position was on the left of the rail and wagon roads leading through Buzzard Roost Gap, on the Dalton road. The enemy had strongly fortified this pass and the high ridge on either side. I had some previous knowledge of the position, and knew that it was impregnable to our assaults; but in obedience to orders we frequently made the attempt with a heavy skirmish line, at which my loss was about 40 men. Finally, a portion of our army having passed the ridge farther sout
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
and in the afternoon formed line of battle and bivouacked near Catoosa Springs. Again, on the morning of the 7th, moved to Tunnel Hill, formed line of battle, and advanced upon the enemy, who were behind works, but they soon evacuated them, leaving our troops in possession of the town and works. At an early hour the next morning, May 8, this regiment advanced in front line down the valley, driving in the rebel skirmishers till within range of the enemy, who was strongly intrenched on Rocky Face Ridge. This regiment was only engaged occasionally at skirmishing till the morning of 13th of May, when it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated. A company of this regiment which was on picket advanced and occupied the enemy's works and joined the column moving through the town of Dalton. A short distance south of the town we came upon the rear guard of the retreating foe, who were shelling our advance. This regiment was thrown forward as skirmishers and captured a rebel captain.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
bivouacked for the night, nothing of importance transpiring in which I had part. Next morning, the 8th of May, I was ordered to take position different from that which I held during the night, and in the general line. The line being formed, my regiment was formed in rear of the center of the brigade as supporting column. Here I lay until the next morning, 9th, at 8 o'clock, when I was ordered to move with the Eightyfourth Illinois, Colonel Waters commanding, to the right and base of Rocky Face Ridge, where I again formed in order of battle on left of Eighty-fourth Illinois. From here I sent forward, agreeably to orders, a heavy skirmish line under command of Capt. William Dawson, acting major of the regiment, with orders to force the enemy back as far as possible. The order was promptly obeyed, my line occupying a position within 150 yards of his works. I remained here until about 4.30 p. m., when I was ordered to the right along the base of the ridge to Mill Creek Gap, the skir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
f the operations of my regiment during the campaign commencing on the 5th of May, 1864, and ending on the 8th of September, 1864: On the 3d of May, 1864, the regiment broke camp at Blue Springs, at 12 m., and moved out six miles to the Knoxville and Dalton Railroad, and encamped for the night. On Wednesday, May 4, we marched at 5 a. m. to Catoosa Springs, where we encamped for two days. On Saturday, May 7, marched south to Tunnel Hill. On Sunday, May 8, moved to Mill Creek Gap and Rocky Face Ridge. On Monday, May 9, near midnight, the regiment went on picket. On Tuesday, May 10, skirmished all day with the enemy; had 3 enlisted men wounded. On Wednesday, May 11, the regiment, with the Thirtieth Indiana, moved on to a ridge which commanded Mill Creek Gap, and threw up rifle-pits. On Friday, May 13, at 5 a. m. the regiment with the division moved forward through Dalton, and at 9 a. m. came up with the enemy's rear guard; had some skirmishing, and went into camp. On Saturday, M
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