hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 2 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 24 results in 10 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bridges. (search)
t Poughkeepsie; is composed of two cantilever spans on each shore of 523 feet, and a central cantilever span of 521 feet, joined by two ordinary girders of 500 feet span with projecting cantilever ends; work begun 1886; opened in 1888. Blackwell's Island Bride (under construction), across the East River north of the Brooklyn Bridge. It has four channel piers, 135 feet above high-water. The bridge will be 2 miles in length, with two channel spans of 846 feet each, and one across Blackwell'Blackwell's Island of 613 feet. Girder and miscellaneous bridges. Arthur Kill Bridge, between Staten Island and New Jersey, consists of two shore-spans of 150 feet each, covered by fixed trusses, and a draw 500 feet in length; can be opened and closed in two minutes; bridge authorized by act of Congress June 16, 1886; completed at a cost of $450,000, June 13, 1888. Wooden bridge, over the Connecticut at Hanover, with a single arch of 236 feet; erected in 1796. Potomac Run Bridge, a famous tres
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sayre, Lewis Albert 1820- (search)
Sayre, Lewis Albert 1820- Surgeon; born in Battle Hill (now Madison), N. J., Feb. 29, 1820; graduated at Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky., in 1839, and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, in 1842, when he became prosecutor to the Professor of Surgery in that college, which he held till 1852; was surgeon in Bellevue Hospital in 1853-73; the Charity Hospital on Blackwell's Island in 1859-73; and consulting surgeon in both hospitals from 1873 till his death. He was the first American surgeon to successfully operate for the hip disease; invented numerous surgical instruments and appliances; introduced new methods of treatment in various diseases, and was author of Practical manual of the treatment of Clubfoot; Spinal disease and Spinal Curvature, etc. He died in New York City, Sept. 21, 1900.
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
ey's invitation that Margaret became a member of the Greeley household when she went to New York. Until the latter part of the year 1844 the Greeleys had lived within less than half a mile of the Tribune office, one experiment in Broome Street convincing the editor that that location was too far from his work. After his exertions in the great Clay campaign of 1844 the family took an old wooden house, surrounded by eight acres of land, on the East River, at Turtle Bay, nearly opposite Blackwell's Island. Margaret Fuller described it as two miles or more from the thickly settled part of New York, but omnibuses and cars give me constant access to the city. She did not complain of her accommodations there, but Greeley suggests that, in her physical condition, a better furnished room and a more liberal table would have added to her happiness. Greeley did not grant a ready acceptance to all of Miss Fuller's views. She wrote a great deal for the Tribune, however, on social questions,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 13: business life in New York. (1844-1846.) (search)
veries, as at Boston and Brook Farm, but in writing such a note as the following to Mr. Channing: New Year's Eve [1845]. I forgot to ask you, dear William, where we shall begin in our round of visits to the public institutions. I want to make a beginning, as, probably, one a day and once a week will be enough for my time and strength. Now is the time for me to see and write about these things, as my European stock will not be here till spring. Should you like to begin with Blackwell's Island, Monday or Tuesday of next week? Ms. (W. H. C.) She was at this time living in full sight of that celebrated penitentiary of which she writes. At the suggestion of Mrs. Greeley, who had known Margaret Fuller in Boston, she was not only invited to become a writer in the Tribune but a member of the editor's family; Mr. Greeley expressly stating that he regarded her rather as his wife's friend than his own. Parton's Greeley, p. 258 He had lately taken up his residence in a lar
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 19: the Tribune continues. (search)
ocos were afraid Shaler would decline, as they said his friends would vote for Crolius rather than Emmons, who is rather too well known. We concede 300 majority to Morris, but our friends can reduce it to 200 if they work right. Empire Eighth! shall your faithful Gedney be defeated? Has he not deserved better at your hands? And sweet, too, he was foully cheated out of his election last year by Loco-Foco fire companies brought in from the Fifteenth, and prisoners imported from Blackwell's Island. Eighteen of them in one house! You owe it to your candiates to elect them—you owe it still more to yourselves—and yet your Collector quarrel makes us doubt a little. Whigs of the Eighth! resolve to carry your Alderman and you will! Any how, Robert Smith will have a majority—we'll state it moderately at 200. Blooming Twelfth! The Country Ward is steadily improving, politically as well as physically. The Whigs run their popular Alderman of last year; the Locos have made a m<
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 10 (search)
report transcribed when the impressions of the hour had grown faint, give but a shadow of the broad good sense, hearty fellowfeeling, and pathetic hopefulness, which made so effective her truly womanly appeal. This intercourse with the most unfortunate of her sex, and a desire to learn more of the causes of their degradation, and of the means of restoring them, led Margaret, immediately on reaching New York, to visit the various benevolent institutions, and especially the prisons on Blackwell's Island. And it was while walking among the beds of the lazar-house,—mis-called hospital,—which then, to the disgrace of the city, was the cess-pool of its social filth, that an incident occurred, as touching as it was surprising to herself. A woman was pointed out who bore a very bad character, as hardened, sulky, and impenetrable. She was in bad health and rapidly failing. Margaret requested to be left alone with her; and to her question, Are you willing to die? the woman answered, Y
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, The two young offenders. (search)
and friendless, the poor young creature became almost frantic. In that desperate state of mind, she was decoyed by a woman, who kept a disreputable house. A short career of reckless frivolity and vice ended, as usual, in the hospital on Blackwell's Island. When she was discharged, she tried to drown her sorrow and remorse in intemperance, and went on ever from bad to worse, till she became a denizen of Five Points. In her brief intervals of sobriety, she was thoroughly disgusted with herseurally bright faculties were stupified by opium. After she left the Asylum, she lived with a family in the country for awhile; but the old habits returned, and destroyed what little strength she had left. The last I knew of her she was on Blackwell's Island; and she will probably never leave it, till she goes where the weary are at rest. An uncommon degree of interest was excited in Friend Hopper's mind by the sufferings of another individual, whom I will call Julia Peters. She was born of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to my mind) that the depositions made by Campbell, Snevel, Wright, Patten, Mrs. Douglass, and others, are false; that they are cunningly devised, diabolical fabrications of Conover, verified by his suborned and perjured accomplices. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to my mind) that the depositions made by Campbell, Snevel, Wright, Patten, Mrs. Douglass, and others, are false; that they are cunningly devised, diabolical fabrications of Conover, verified by his suborned and perjured accomplices. T
hmond on another peace mission. As "the fools are not all dead yet, " I suppose there are some persons who believe that, especially as "gold is weak. " There are other stories about Secretary Seward's resignation, and "another important movement of the Army of the Potomac," but the foundation for them is probably as airy as that of the first mentioned. If lying were a State prison or penitentiary offence, we should need further additions to the present accommodations of Sing Sing and Blackwell's Island. That is certain. Colonel Baker received a deputation of a large number of supervisors this morning from several towns in this State, who were anxious to ascertain if the Government would oblige them to refill their quotas, owing to the frauds of the bounty-brokers whom they paid for recruits. The Colonel stated his belief that the towns would have to furnish "men in boots," and that they had better proceed vigorously with the work of raising substitutes if they desired to escap